Routers, Switches, Modem Routers???


Taffycat

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It occurred to me that our router, though still working well, is getting on a bit (it has been working 24/7 for about 3 years now.) It's a wired, Netgear 834G v3 ADSL modem router.

Sooo... I've been trawling around, in search of another Netgear (having enjoyed trouble-free service thus far, from the current model.) My main criterion, was that it must be wired. (Though "wired" choices would seem to be a tad limited due to the popularity of wireless.)

But now I am thoroughly confused by the fact that some are called "switches" others are "modem routers" whilst others are just plain old "routers" ..... and the more I try to understand the differences, the more entangled I seem to get... literally as well as mentally :confused: Lol.

A while ago, there was much talk (on my ISPs forum) about the need for a "broadchip" router (to cater for greater adsl speeds being rolled-out this year.)

Can anyone please help to explain in simple terms, what I need to know when making my next choice please? Or maybe point my nose in the direction of a straightforward online explanation...? Sorry to sound so lame, but I'd kind of taken it for granted that a router was a router. :blush: Buying our first one (mentioned above) I'd been blissfully unaware of any differences, and simply gone with the one on the shelf of our local Curry's! :p (Please don't suggest that I go back to them, I've already looked and found only wireless choices on their shelves.)


Any advice gratefully received. Thank you in advance for reading this :D
 
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Is it not worth getting in touch with your ISP and asking them to supply you with a new one ?

They give em out anyway with new subscribers but if you been with them for a while they may agree?
Otherwise you could always ask them for advice aswell.

I know what you mean by confused though. There are that many type's, brand's, model's and manufacturer's nowadays you can sit for hour's trawling through them all and still not get anywhere
 

Taffycat

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TriplexDread said:
Is it not worth getting in touch with your ISP and asking them to supply you with a new one ?

... you can sit for hour's trawling through them all and still not get anywhere
Hi TXD, no, my ISP only sells them and the model I had my eye on, seems to have disappeared from the ones in stock. :rolleyes:

Must admit, my little grey cells have certainly been spinning this morning, lol.
 
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I'm exactly the same when I decide to look at upgrading my PC

Which board is future proof, what memory, CPU, PSU, Case etc etc its a proper headache lol
 

muckshifter

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do you really wanna know ??

Hubs are small, simple, inexpensive devices that join multiple computers together at a low-level network protocol layer.

Switches join multiple computers together at a low-level network protocol layer with additional intelligence above that offered by hubs.

... Technically speaking, hubs operate using a broadcast model and switches operate using a virtual circuit model.

When four computers are connected to a hub, for example, and two of those computers communicate with each other, hubs simply pass through all network traffic to each of the four computers.

Switches, on the other hand, are capable of determining the destination of each individual traffic element (such as an Ethernet frame) and selectively forwarding data to the one computer that actually needs it. By generating less network traffic in delivering messages, a switch performs better than a hub on busy networks.

Now Routers are physical devices that join multiple wired or wireless networks together. Technically, a wired or wireless router is a Layer 3 gateway, meaning that the wired/wireless router connects networks (as gateways do), and that the router operates at the network layer of the OSI model.

Home networkers often use an Internet Protocol (IP) wired or wireless router, IP being the most common OSI network layer protocol. An IP router such as a DSL or cable modem broadband router joins the home's local area network (LAN) to the wide-area network (WAN) of the Internet.


So, If you wanna connect to the Tinternet, you gonna need a Router. :D


:user:
 

Taffycat

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muckshifter said:
So, If you wanna connect to the Tinternet, you gonna need a Router.:D
:lol: :lol:

But seriously, Wow...! Thank you Mucks for taking the time to explain. :bow: This is very helpful. I'm going to read it a few more times though, to consolidate it in my wee brain.

One question that still remains though, is, how significant is the difference between a "Modem Router" and just a "Router?" This bit still puzzles me.
:blush:

Okay, going to the back of the class, wearing me pointy hat with the big "D" on it again... ;)
 
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floppybootstomp

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A router is purely for networking and simply connects a number of computers, if an Internet connection is required the router is used with an external modem. The modem plugs into a dedicated port on the router.

A router/modem is simply a router with a modem built in.

You will need to determine whether you need a cable or an ADSL modem when making your choice.

Most wireless router & router/modems will have four ethernet ports for hard wired connection, incidentally.

I have a Linksys wireless modem with three of the ethernet ports hard wired and my daughter's laptop uses the wireless connection.

Many here speak well of the Netgear series but I avoid them after my last Netgear Router/Modem went belly up on me after 18 months.
 

Taffycat

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Thanks very much, Flopps and Mucks, now I've got the picture much more clearly. :thumb: It's often so much more helpful when things are explained like that, than trolling around, reading all the blurb on individual components - if you see what I mean? I was getting a bit bogged-down earlier.

I didn't know that a wireless router could be hard-wired, that's interesting too :nod:

I can look around with renewed interest now - although my experience with Netgear has been good, so probably will be inclined to go for another. Also, it was pretty easy to set up, as I recall.... but I daresay, that could be said of the other brands, because presumably, they too would have set-up wizards and what not, to assist(?)

Many thanks for your time guys, I appreciate the help :D
 
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what is your budget?

I've had Linksys and Netgear in the past
wouldn't get Linksys again
 

Taffycat

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psd99 said:
what is your budget?

I've had Linksys and Netgear in the past
psd99 said:

wouldn't get Linksys again


Hi psd99, I'm pretty much sold on another Netgear - been very lucky with our current model. Looking around, the prices are approx £45 (give or take) so that doesn't seem too bad :thumb:
 

floppybootstomp

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I've had Linksys and Netgear in the past.

Wouldn't get Netgear again.

;)

Once a product fails on me, that's it - boycott time.

Linksys Wireless/Router now 21 months old, been on 24/7, which is longer than the similar Netgear lasted.
 
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Taffycat

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floppybootstomp said:
I've had Linksys and Netgear in the past.

Wouldn't get Netgear again.

;)

Once a product fails on me, that's it - boycott time.

Linksys Wireless/Router now 21 months old, been on 24/7, which is longer than the similar Netgear lasted.


I'm just the same Flopps. We bought a really nice Bosch fridge/freezer once. It was frost-free, and at the time, was rather expensive, but it was spacious and would nag if the temp was too low, or high, etc. Anyway, it went wrong before it was 2 years old.

The Bosch repair man came back and forth several times in the space of a month. Each time professing himself to be "baffled" then eventually, he admitted defeat and told us that we needed a new one! Bosch made us a very silly offer of about £40 against the cost of replacement (the original had cost £600).

We hadn't mistreated the appliance in any way, it had just failed on us - causing quite a problem at the time, because it was summer and therefore a nightmare to keep stuff fresh.

Needless to say, we have never bought any Bosh kitchen appliances since!:(

To be fair, we own a few Bosh power tools, and they are great. :thumb:
 

floppybootstomp

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Interesting.

I think we're all influenced by brands that we buy and their behaviour, tis only human nature.

However, I would never insist that the brand I use is better than another, for that very reason - we all have different experiences.

As one progresses in years, one does indeed see the bigger picture.

Though tis true certain brands, by mass consensus, do emerge as true crapola, Mesh, for instance ;)

As for Bosch, right at this moment I'm programming a Bosch Plena Alarm Controller amplifier and the software is rubbish :D But the amp is a goodie once it's configured.

I also have a 24V cordless Bosch percussion drill which I consider one of the best purchases I've ever made, I bought it around June '07.

My washing machine, an Indesit, is coming up for 8 years old and it's used about 5 days out of 7 atm and it's been flawless. Past experience tells me it may be coming to the end of it's life though and I've looked at all the washing machines currently available.

Bosch don't seem to do anything special but there's an LG direct drive model costing about £480.00 that's caught my eye and I've put the money away in readiness for when the Indesit goes belly-up (if it ever does).

There we go, from Routers to Washing Machines in one fell swoop ;)
 

Taffycat

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Floppybootstomp said:
Bosch don't seem to do anything special but there's an LG direct drive model costing about £480.00 that's caught my eye and I've put the money away in readiness for when the Indesit goes belly-up (if it ever does).

That LG sounds very interesting, I guess being a direct-drive would make it a tad quieter to operate too? We currently own a Hotpoint washer/dryer, it's only about 2 years old, but boy is it noisy! Not so bad on the wash cycle, but murder when it spins. It has also developed an annoying "knock" so guessing that a bearing (or something) is going to need attention soon. :rolleyes:

Your Indesit has done very well :thumb:
 
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Taffycat said:


Hi psd99, I'm pretty much sold on another Netgear - been very lucky with our current model. Looking around, the prices are approx £45 (give or take) so that doesn't seem too bad :thumb:
I recommend it
I got the exact same model :)
 

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