Corporate Imaging vs. SysPrep. What is an Administrator suppose to


G

Guest

I have installed XPSP2, setup my default user profile and Administrator
profile exactly the way I want it. I sysprepped it with sysprep 2.0. I reboot
the PC and let mini-setup run through it's course. I logon as Administrator,
and sysprep has immediately played with my desktop. It has two icons on the
desktop that I don't want there (Windows Media Player and MSN Explorer).

The first logon after sysprep seems to be the worst. The Administrator
account is not a new account that can pull off the custom "default user"
profile, so the Administrator account that you might of setup with custom
settings becomes completely jacked up with what sysprep wants to do with it
(which is put icons everywhere (Start Menu, Desktop). This ain't cool,
because if you want to setup a corporate image, you have to setup all these
registry settings in the [GUIRunOnce] section of sysprep.inf to get your
Administrator profile halfway back to where you had it before sysprep
stripped it out.

Boy, do I remember the "good ole Windows 2000 days" when sysprep and
Microsoft didn't intervene on your profile settings.

Anyway, my questions are these:

1) What version of Sysprep started adding icons to the Desktop and Start Menu?
2) Media Player seems to generate itself on a new user's desktop. Why is this?
3) What part of the registry is causing Media Player to generate itself on
every user's desktop? Does it have to do with JIT Active Setup (Just InTime
Installer)?
3) Maybe i'm missing something here, but i've tried to get sysprep to not
mess with my Administrator profile (which is the first profile I use after
sysprepping an OS), The only way I've been able to get it back to the custom
Administrator profile I want, is to tweak the registry to clear the MRU-Most
Recently Used list on the Start Menu and remove MSN Exlplorer icon from the
"All Users" profile, etc. Is there another way? Am I doing it wrong?

The way Microsoft pushed these Out of the box Start Menu/Desktop icons onto
a Windows Professional Desktop, with their Sysprep utility, it makes me think
the "Professsional" product they are trying to push is not really for the
corporation environment. If you have to go through hoops as an Admin to
uninstall a bunch of programs (like Windows Media Player) and clear icons
from Start Menu's & Desktop's via the registry, to have a semi-professional
Corporate feel, then Microsoft has stepped over the line with their
"Professional" product marketing. This type of pushing "Windows Media Player"
down OEM and Corporations throats is not right. Windows Media Player is for
fun and games and doesn't deserve to be pushed onto each user's profile when
they log into their corporate PC for the first time. It such a waste of time
for a System Administrator to have to force group Policy to stop Windows
Media Player from auto-generating itself onto a new user's desktop when
Windows Media Player is for "Home" not "Work".

Microsoft, please put the game "Pinball" on the desktop of your Vista
Professional produst when it comes out and make sure the "Pinball" shortcut
auto-generate's itself so that each time a user logs in, they receive the
"Pinball" game. Please make sure you force the "pinball" game on us, and make
sure the System Admins of corporate America use group policy to stop endusers
from screwing off and playing "pinball" on corporate time.

Also please add a few "full-featured" pornos to your Windows Media Player
when Vista comes out and make sure you "pin" them to our Start Menu so we can
reach them "fast". Thank You!

Best Regards,
Rick Blake
 
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A

Adam Leinss

I have installed XPSP2, setup my default user profile and
Administrator profile exactly the way I want it. I sysprepped it
with sysprep 2.0. I reboot the PC and let mini-setup run through
it's course. I logon as Administrator, and sysprep has immediately
played with my desktop. It has two icons on the desktop that I
don't want there (Windows Media Player and MSN Explorer).

My biggest pet peeve is when Windows recreates the Outlook Express icon
on new profiles even when it is not in the Default User profile and it
is impossible to remove Outlook Express, unless you pay for a program
like TweakUI to rip it completely out of the operating system.

Of course, once you do that, some update comes comes out for Outlook
Express and some how it gets reinstalled again.

Unfortunately, to get Windows to look exactly the way you want to you
have to do a lot of scripting/hacking. Microsoft has listened some
what and has given us the Shared Computer Toolkit for Windows XP that
lets us make some really sweet kiosk machines that were just down right
impossible to create effectively with Windows 2000.

I think I've solved the Outlook Express problem by blanking out some
hexadecimal number in the Active Setup portion of the registry, but I
haven't had the time to investigate the Windows Media Player icon.

I agree, it shouldn't be this hard.

Adam
 
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W

William Stokes

I'm sensing some frustration here...

But of course you are correct. I don't like these 'features' either. Please
let me know if you found any answers.

-Will

Rick Blake said:
I have installed XPSP2, setup my default user profile and Administrator
profile exactly the way I want it. I sysprepped it with sysprep 2.0. I
reboot
the PC and let mini-setup run through it's course. I logon as
Administrator,
and sysprep has immediately played with my desktop. It has two icons on
the
desktop that I don't want there (Windows Media Player and MSN Explorer).

The first logon after sysprep seems to be the worst. The Administrator
account is not a new account that can pull off the custom "default user"
profile, so the Administrator account that you might of setup with custom
settings becomes completely jacked up with what sysprep wants to do with
it
(which is put icons everywhere (Start Menu, Desktop). This ain't cool,
because if you want to setup a corporate image, you have to setup all
these
registry settings in the [GUIRunOnce] section of sysprep.inf to get your
Administrator profile halfway back to where you had it before sysprep
stripped it out.

Boy, do I remember the "good ole Windows 2000 days" when sysprep and
Microsoft didn't intervene on your profile settings.

Anyway, my questions are these:

1) What version of Sysprep started adding icons to the Desktop and Start
Menu?
2) Media Player seems to generate itself on a new user's desktop. Why is
this?
3) What part of the registry is causing Media Player to generate itself on
every user's desktop? Does it have to do with JIT Active Setup (Just
InTime
Installer)?
3) Maybe i'm missing something here, but i've tried to get sysprep to not
mess with my Administrator profile (which is the first profile I use after
sysprepping an OS), The only way I've been able to get it back to the
custom
Administrator profile I want, is to tweak the registry to clear the
MRU-Most
Recently Used list on the Start Menu and remove MSN Exlplorer icon from
the
"All Users" profile, etc. Is there another way? Am I doing it wrong?

The way Microsoft pushed these Out of the box Start Menu/Desktop icons
onto
a Windows Professional Desktop, with their Sysprep utility, it makes me
think
the "Professsional" product they are trying to push is not really for the
corporation environment. If you have to go through hoops as an Admin to
uninstall a bunch of programs (like Windows Media Player) and clear icons
from Start Menu's & Desktop's via the registry, to have a
semi-professional
Corporate feel, then Microsoft has stepped over the line with their
"Professional" product marketing. This type of pushing "Windows Media
Player"
down OEM and Corporations throats is not right. Windows Media Player is
for
fun and games and doesn't deserve to be pushed onto each user's profile
when
they log into their corporate PC for the first time. It such a waste of
time
for a System Administrator to have to force group Policy to stop Windows
Media Player from auto-generating itself onto a new user's desktop when
Windows Media Player is for "Home" not "Work".

Microsoft, please put the game "Pinball" on the desktop of your Vista
Professional produst when it comes out and make sure the "Pinball"
shortcut
auto-generate's itself so that each time a user logs in, they receive the
"Pinball" game. Please make sure you force the "pinball" game on us, and
make
sure the System Admins of corporate America use group policy to stop
endusers
from screwing off and playing "pinball" on corporate time.

Also please add a few "full-featured" pornos to your Windows Media Player
when Vista comes out and make sure you "pin" them to our Start Menu so we
can
reach them "fast". Thank You!

Best Regards,
Rick Blake
 

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