XP Home and XP Pro on two separate drives


P

Peter Malling

I had a drive with XP Home, which had become too small. So I purchased
a new drive on which I'll install XP Pro. However, I still want to keep
the XP Home disk until I'm pretty sure that I've got all programs and
settings I need transferred to the new disk. By default, the system
should boot from the new XP Pro disk.

The old disk is a 80 GB
The new disk is a Maxtor 6L300R0 300 GB

How should the jumper settings on the disks be, which should be master
and which should be slave?

Peter.
 
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T

Timothy Daniels

Peter Malling said:
I had a drive with XP Home, which had become too small. So
I purchased a new drive on which I'll install XP Pro. However,
I still want to keep the XP Home disk until I'm pretty sure that
I've got all programs and settings I need transferred to the
new disk. By default, the system should boot from the new
XP Pro disk.

The old disk is a 80 GB
The new disk is a Maxtor 6L300R0 300 GB

How should the jumper settings on the disks be, which should
be master and which should be slave?

It doesn't matter. Just install the WinXP Pro on the new HD
while the old HD is disconnected.

Here's how most BIOSs work: The HD boot order (i.e. HD
boot priority) has a its *default* in the case of IDE HDs:
Master, ch. 0,
Slave, ch. 0,
Master, ch. 1,
Slave, ch. 1.

In the case of SATA HDs, the default HD boot order is just
their channel number order. Mixes of IDE and SATA usually
have the HD boot order overflow from IDE to SATA..

Using this HD boot order, you can control which HD is
tested first for the presence of a Master Boot Record (MBR).
The 1st HD encountered with an MBR takes control and
and looks for the Primary partition marked "active". The MBR
hands control to the Boot Sector on that partition. The Boot
Sector then looks for the loader (ntldr) within its partition, and
the boot loading proceeds under control of ntldr. In the process
of booting, ntldr looks at a file called "boot.ini" that tells it where
to find the folder for the OS - which may be on any partition
on any HD in the system.

During installation of WinXP, the installer looks around to see
if there are any other partitions that are already present, and
it names the installation partition according to what names are
available. It also looks for OSes already installed. If it finds none,
it builds a boot.ini file that lists only one OS - the one that it is
currently installing - and it names its partition "C:".

It's much simpler conceptually (and adheres to tradition) to have
the running OS calls its own partition "C:". You can accomplish
that by installing the OS in an isolated HD that has only a single
partition at the time of installation.

Now, assuming that you've installed the WinXP Pro in its own
isolated partition on the new HD, you can control which OS
starts up in one of two ways - by adjusting the HD boot order in
the BIOS or by using the boot.ini file's dual-boot configuration.

Via the BIOS:

Jumper the 2 HDs differently or put them on different channels
so that they have different positions in the HD boot order. The
HD with the highest priority will control the booting, and since
the only OS seen during its installation was itself, the OS on
that HD will be indicated by its boot.ini file. By *default*, the
Master on ch. 0 will have the highest boot priority. If there is
no HD as "Master", the "Slave" on ch 0 will have the highest
priority, etc. Then, to vary the HD boot order, go into the BIOS
and adjust the HD boot order whenever you want to change
which HD boots.

Via boot.ini

You can edit the boot.ini file (at C:\boot.ini) with Notepad. Under
the line "[operating systems]", there will be a single line with an
entry that matches the line listed after "default=". That single entry
is the entry for the OS that boots as default and it will have a
parameter "rdisk(0)" in it. Just add another entry under the
"[operating systems]" line that has "rdisk(1)" instead. Also
change the value after "timeout" from 0 to some reasonable
timeout value such as "10" to give you 10 seconds to decide
which OS to select. Do that on both HDs. Then, at boot time,
ntldr will present you with a menu having 2 selections corresponding
to the 2 OSes. The OS on "the other" HD will always be the
2nd entry in the list. On the HD containing the WinXP Home,
the 2nd entry will be for WinXP Pro. On the HD containing the
WinXP Pro, the 2nd entry will be for WinXP Home. You can
indicate this in the arbitrary text string after each entry in boot.ini.

You can edit the boot.ini file for either HD regardless of which
OS is running. The partition of the running OS will be "C:", and
the partition for the other OS will be "D:".

You can also edit the boot.ini file for the currently running OS by
clicking Start/Run/enter msconfig/select BOOT.INI tab. You can
then edit the file manually, or by clicking "Check All Boot Paths",
msconfig will do it automatically for you.

*TimDaniels*
 
P

Peter Malling

Tim,
Thank you so much for your elaborate reply, Tim. It's very kind of you.

I've now changed around the cables, so that my 2 HDDs are on one cable
(80 wire, I think), while the CD and DVD drives are on the other (40
wire, I think).

You recommend that I install XP Pro on the new drive, while the old one
is disconnected. Now, I can't do that. If I set up the new drive as
slave and boot from my old XP configuration (with the old drive as
master), I can access data on new drive. The drive seems to be working
perfectly well. I partitioned and formated it through windows, when it
was connected via usb in an external box. And I copied some data to it.

But if I make the new drive the master (by the jumper), and disconnect
the old drive, and then boot from the XP Pro setup CD, the computer
hangs with a blank screen after it has shown the message "setup is
inspecting your computers hardware configuration", and it doesn't get
to the blue setup screen. It clearly has something to do with the new
drive, because if no drives at all are connected, it will let me
through to the blue setup menu.

I have absolutely no idea what could cause this behavior. The manual
for the drive says that I should use the MaxBlast program to partition
and format the drive, but on the other hand, the manual also says: "It
is only necessary to use MaxBlast if Windows Setup is unable
to recognize the full capacity of the drive due to BIOS and
operating system limitations such as the 137 GB barrier ("Using
a Drive Larger than 137 GB" on page 22).".


Peter.


Timothy said:
Peter Malling said:
I had a drive with XP Home, which had become too small. So
I purchased a new drive on which I'll install XP Pro. However,
I still want to keep the XP Home disk until I'm pretty sure that
I've got all programs and settings I need transferred to the
new disk. By default, the system should boot from the new
XP Pro disk.

The old disk is a 80 GB
The new disk is a Maxtor 6L300R0 300 GB

How should the jumper settings on the disks be, which should
be master and which should be slave?

It doesn't matter. Just install the WinXP Pro on the new HD
while the old HD is disconnected.

Here's how most BIOSs work: The HD boot order (i.e. HD
boot priority) has a its *default* in the case of IDE HDs:
Master, ch. 0,
Slave, ch. 0,
Master, ch. 1,
Slave, ch. 1.

In the case of SATA HDs, the default HD boot order is just
their channel number order. Mixes of IDE and SATA usually
have the HD boot order overflow from IDE to SATA..

Using this HD boot order, you can control which HD is
tested first for the presence of a Master Boot Record (MBR).
The 1st HD encountered with an MBR takes control and
and looks for the Primary partition marked "active". The MBR
hands control to the Boot Sector on that partition. The Boot
Sector then looks for the loader (ntldr) within its partition, and
the boot loading proceeds under control of ntldr. In the process
of booting, ntldr looks at a file called "boot.ini" that tells it where
to find the folder for the OS - which may be on any partition
on any HD in the system.

During installation of WinXP, the installer looks around to see
if there are any other partitions that are already present, and
it names the installation partition according to what names are
available. It also looks for OSes already installed. If it finds none,
it builds a boot.ini file that lists only one OS - the one that it is
currently installing - and it names its partition "C:".

It's much simpler conceptually (and adheres to tradition) to have
the running OS calls its own partition "C:". You can accomplish
that by installing the OS in an isolated HD that has only a single
partition at the time of installation.

Now, assuming that you've installed the WinXP Pro in its own
isolated partition on the new HD, you can control which OS
starts up in one of two ways - by adjusting the HD boot order in
the BIOS or by using the boot.ini file's dual-boot configuration.

Via the BIOS:

Jumper the 2 HDs differently or put them on different channels
so that they have different positions in the HD boot order. The
HD with the highest priority will control the booting, and since
the only OS seen during its installation was itself, the OS on
that HD will be indicated by its boot.ini file. By *default*, the
Master on ch. 0 will have the highest boot priority. If there is
no HD as "Master", the "Slave" on ch 0 will have the highest
priority, etc. Then, to vary the HD boot order, go into the BIOS
and adjust the HD boot order whenever you want to change
which HD boots.

Via boot.ini

You can edit the boot.ini file (at C:\boot.ini) with Notepad. Under
the line "[operating systems]", there will be a single line with an
entry that matches the line listed after "default=". That single entry
is the entry for the OS that boots as default and it will have a
parameter "rdisk(0)" in it. Just add another entry under the
"[operating systems]" line that has "rdisk(1)" instead. Also
change the value after "timeout" from 0 to some reasonable
timeout value such as "10" to give you 10 seconds to decide
which OS to select. Do that on both HDs. Then, at boot time,
ntldr will present you with a menu having 2 selections corresponding
to the 2 OSes. The OS on "the other" HD will always be the
2nd entry in the list. On the HD containing the WinXP Home,
the 2nd entry will be for WinXP Pro. On the HD containing the
WinXP Pro, the 2nd entry will be for WinXP Home. You can
indicate this in the arbitrary text string after each entry in boot.ini.

You can edit the boot.ini file for either HD regardless of which
OS is running. The partition of the running OS will be "C:", and
the partition for the other OS will be "D:".

You can also edit the boot.ini file for the currently running OS by
clicking Start/Run/enter msconfig/select BOOT.INI tab. You can
then edit the file manually, or by clicking "Check All Boot Paths",
msconfig will do it automatically for you.

*TimDaniels*
 
A

Admiral Q

: Tim,
: Thank you so much for your elaborate reply, Tim. It's very kind of
you.
:
: I've now changed around the cables, so that my 2 HDDs are on one
cable
: (80 wire, I think), while the CD and DVD drives are on the other
(40
: wire, I think).
:
: You recommend that I install XP Pro on the new drive, while the
old one
: is disconnected. Now, I can't do that. If I set up the new drive
as
: slave and boot from my old XP configuration (with the old drive as
: master), I can access data on new drive. The drive seems to be
working
: perfectly well. I partitioned and formated it through windows,
when it
: was connected via usb in an external box. And I copied some data
to it.
:
: But if I make the new drive the master (by the jumper), and
disconnect
: the old drive, and then boot from the XP Pro setup CD, the
computer
: hangs with a blank screen after it has shown the message "setup is
: inspecting your computers hardware configuration", and it doesn't
get
: to the blue setup screen. It clearly has something to do with the
new
: drive, because if no drives at all are connected, it will let me
: through to the blue setup menu.
:
: I have absolutely no idea what could cause this behavior. The
manual
: for the drive says that I should use the MaxBlast program to
partition
: and format the drive, but on the other hand, the manual also says:
"It
: is only necessary to use MaxBlast if Windows Setup is unable
: to recognize the full capacity of the drive due to BIOS and
: operating system limitations such as the 137 GB barrier ("Using
: a Drive Larger than 137 GB" on page 22).".
:
:
: Peter.
:
:
: Timothy Daniels wrote:
: > "Peter Malling" wrote:
: > > I had a drive with XP Home, which had become too small. So
: > > I purchased a new drive on which I'll install XP Pro. However,
: > > I still want to keep the XP Home disk until I'm pretty sure
that
: > > I've got all programs and settings I need transferred to the
: > > new disk. By default, the system should boot from the new
: > > XP Pro disk.
: > >
: > > The old disk is a 80 GB
: > > The new disk is a Maxtor 6L300R0 300 GB
: > >
: > > How should the jumper settings on the disks be, which should
: > > be master and which should be slave?
: >
: >
: > It doesn't matter. Just install the WinXP Pro on the new HD
: > while the old HD is disconnected.
: >
: > Here's how most BIOSs work: The HD boot order (i.e. HD
: > boot priority) has a its *default* in the case of IDE HDs:
: > Master, ch. 0,
: > Slave, ch. 0,
: > Master, ch. 1,
: > Slave, ch. 1.
: >
: > In the case of SATA HDs, the default HD boot order is just
: > their channel number order. Mixes of IDE and SATA usually
: > have the HD boot order overflow from IDE to SATA..
: >
: > Using this HD boot order, you can control which HD is
: > tested first for the presence of a Master Boot Record (MBR).
: > The 1st HD encountered with an MBR takes control and
: > and looks for the Primary partition marked "active". The
MBR
: > hands control to the Boot Sector on that partition. The
Boot
: > Sector then looks for the loader (ntldr) within its
partition, and
: > the boot loading proceeds under control of ntldr. In the
process
: > of booting, ntldr looks at a file called "boot.ini" that
tells it where
: > to find the folder for the OS - which may be on any
partition
: > on any HD in the system.
: >
: > During installation of WinXP, the installer looks around to
see
: > if there are any other partitions that are already present,
and
: > it names the installation partition according to what names
are
: > available. It also looks for OSes already installed. If it
finds none,
: > it builds a boot.ini file that lists only one OS - the one
that it is
: > currently installing - and it names its partition "C:".
: >
: > It's much simpler conceptually (and adheres to tradition) to
have
: > the running OS calls its own partition "C:". You can
accomplish
: > that by installing the OS in an isolated HD that has only a
single
: > partition at the time of installation.
: >
: > Now, assuming that you've installed the WinXP Pro in its own
: > isolated partition on the new HD, you can control which OS
: > starts up in one of two ways - by adjusting the HD boot
order in
: > the BIOS or by using the boot.ini file's dual-boot
configuration.
: >
: > Via the BIOS:
: >
: > Jumper the 2 HDs differently or put them on different
channels
: > so that they have different positions in the HD boot order.
The
: > HD with the highest priority will control the booting, and
since
: > the only OS seen during its installation was itself, the OS
on
: > that HD will be indicated by its boot.ini file. By
*default*, the
: > Master on ch. 0 will have the highest boot priority. If
there is
: > no HD as "Master", the "Slave" on ch 0 will have the highest
: > priority, etc. Then, to vary the HD boot order, go into the
BIOS
: > and adjust the HD boot order whenever you want to change
: > which HD boots.
: >
: > Via boot.ini
: >
: > You can edit the boot.ini file (at C:\boot.ini) with
Notepad. Under
: > the line "[operating systems]", there will be a single line
with an
: > entry that matches the line listed after "default=". That
single entry
: > is the entry for the OS that boots as default and it will
have a
: > parameter "rdisk(0)" in it. Just add another entry under
the
: > "[operating systems]" line that has "rdisk(1)" instead.
Also
: > change the value after "timeout" from 0 to some reasonable
: > timeout value such as "10" to give you 10 seconds to decide
: > which OS to select. Do that on both HDs. Then, at boot
time,
: > ntldr will present you with a menu having 2 selections
corresponding
: > to the 2 OSes. The OS on "the other" HD will always be the
: > 2nd entry in the list. On the HD containing the WinXP Home,
: > the 2nd entry will be for WinXP Pro. On the HD containing
the
: > WinXP Pro, the 2nd entry will be for WinXP Home. You can
: > indicate this in the arbitrary text string after each entry
in boot.ini.
: >
: > You can edit the boot.ini file for either HD regardless of
which
: > OS is running. The partition of the running OS will be
"C:", and
: > the partition for the other OS will be "D:".
: >
: > You can also edit the boot.ini file for the currently
running OS by
: > clicking Start/Run/enter msconfig/select BOOT.INI tab. You
can
: > then edit the file manually, or by clicking "Check All Boot
Paths",
: > msconfig will do it automatically for you.
: >
: > *TimDaniels*
:


Your XP Pro should contain SP1 or SP2 along with your Motherboard
BIOS/CMOS being the most up to date in order to get beyond the 137GB
barrier and not to use the MaxBlast overlay program. FWIW - don't
use the MaxBlast software period, as the overlay just creates
additional I/O, thus slowing down through put, but if need be,
create a slipstreamed copy of WinXP Pro with perfreably SP2
included. AutoStreamer is a very good freeware software package to
help you integrate SP1 or SP2 into a Windows OS.

--


Star Fleet Admiral Q @ your service!

Google is your friend!
http://www.google.com
 
T

Timothy Daniels

Peter Malling said:
I've now changed around the cables, so that my 2 HDDs are on
one cable (80 wire, I think), while the CD and DVD drives are on
the other (40 wire, I think).

You recommend that I install XP Pro on the new drive, while the
old one is disconnected. Now, I can't do that. If I set up the new
drive as slave and boot from my old XP configuration (with the
old drive as master), I can access data on new drive. The drive
seems to be working perfectly well. I partitioned and formated
it through windows, when it was connected via usb in an external
box. And I copied some data to it.

But if I make the new drive the master (by the jumper), and
disconnect the old drive, and then boot from the XP Pro
setup CD, the computer hangs with a blank screen after it
has shown the message "setup is inspecting your computers
hardware configuration", and it doesn't get to the blue setup
screen. It clearly has something to do with the new drive,
because if no drives at all are connected, it will let me
through to the blue setup menu.

I have absolutely no idea what could cause this behavior.
The manual for the drive says that I should use the MaxBlast
program to partition and format the drive, but on the other hand,
the manual also says: "It is only necessary to use MaxBlast
if Windows Setup is unable to recognize the full capacity of
the drive due to BIOS and operating system limitations such
as the 137 GB barrier ("Using a Drive Larger than 137 GB"
on page 22).".

I don't think that the 137GB limit is the cause of your problem.
First, try the easy thing - put the lone HD at the end connector
of the cable. That is the recommended position for lone drives
to keep reflections from an open end connector from confusing
the IDE controller.

If that doesn't help, it might be that the new HD doesn't have
a proper Master Boot Record. Try running "fixmbr" from the XP
installation CD's Recovery Console. Entering "fixmbr ?" will
give you the syntax.

*TimDaniels*
 
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I know this is an old thread but I just wanted to say thanks to Tim Daniels for this post. It helped me fix my Dad's pc. Thanks again.
 
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