Speedup and registry cleaner scams


Ad

Advertisements

P

Paul

Davej said:
There are ads showing up in respectable places for these idiotic registry cleaner scams...

https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20130511192659AAu9TnD

I'm not sure all of these types of programs are scams but I've never used one.

There is little to be gained from this stuff.

Just from a percentages point of view, a registry cleaner is not
going to remove enough stuff to make any difference at all.

If a registry entry is malformed, sometimes a removal routine
causes damage outside the entry in question. This happened with
a certain printer setting left by HP printer installer software.
Such "sleeping defects" in the Registry are best left sleeping.
No sense poking them with a stick (use registry cleaner) and
completely breaking something.

Paul
 
F

Flasherly

I'm not sure all of these types of programs are scams but I've never used one.

I wouldn't think so, then that's why there're places to find
guinea-pig if not normal reviews. Not that normal reviews are exactly
normative when it comes to Microsoft's registry;- it's linked,
potentially, into proprietary Level-1 OS kernels, hence known among a
specialty, you're after, fraught with disclaimers - such as: 'Use at
your own risk.'

When did you last ask yourself why, indeed, wouldn't Microsoft provide
such tools for modifying its operating system. . .

Again, that needn't discredit honest reviewers -- even 'hackers' with
ulterior motives other than Bill Gates' reoccurring dream of
Informational World Domination -- from offering free, (sic) token
registry hacks;- hence, in roundabout ways, regarding relative
assessment, lending to the dubious distinction you affect if too ready
with "blanketing" statements as scams, industrial copyrightists, in
fact, readily might deploy among types of clandestine conditioning,
entrepreneurialism, and its dominant forms of expression over
economic/political sovereignty.

In the world, of course, as we live it;- if you don't like it, the way
it is, I hear Uranus may be more accommodating for relocation.
 
Ad

Advertisements

B

B00ze/Empire

And keep it that way, you'll screw-up something...
There is little to be gained from this stuff.

Just from a percentages point of view, a registry cleaner is not
going to remove enough stuff to make any difference at all.

The registry is a *very* fast database, held in RAM; removing even 1/2
of it blindly is unlikely to make it any faster...
If a registry entry is malformed, sometimes a removal routine
causes damage outside the entry in question. This happened with
a certain printer setting left by HP printer installer software.
Such "sleeping defects" in the Registry are best left sleeping.
No sense poking them with a stick (use registry cleaner) and
completely breaking something.

Paul

Nothing prevents, say Microsoft, from adding registry keys for future
use, which are pointing to nonexistent files at the moment. Nothing
prevents them from later assuming the keys exist. These registry
cleaners are nothing but trouble (even the respected CCleaner).

Best Regards,
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top