Random Crashing After Updating BIOS


A

Andrew Beard

Please forgive the length of this post - I thought that the more information
I provided, the easier it will be to diagnose the problem.

Approximately one month ago I conducted a complete reformat and reinstall of
Windows XP SP2 (from a slip-streamed CD) onto my system with specs as
follows:

CPU: AMD Athlon XP-M (Mobile) 2500+ (running at 200MHz FSB x 11)
Mobo: Abit NF7-S v2 nForce2 Ultra
RAM: 1x Crucial 512MB PC3200
GPU: Sapphire Radeon Atlantis 9800 Pro (128MB)
PSU: Chieftec 360W
HD: Western Digital 160GB 7200rpm HD

After installing Windows, the critical hardware drivers, virus protection
(Norton AntiVirus 2005) and the recommended Windows updates, the system was
running fine (as it
always has done). I then decided I should update the BIOS on my motherboard.
As I have done so many times before, I downloaded the appropriate file from
Abit and followed
their instructions to the letter. After clearing the CMOS for a full minute
I restarted the PC. This is when the problems began.

The computer seemed to freeze at random points during the boot stages -
before Windows even starts to load. Sometimes it would only get as far as
determining the speed of
the CPU before freezing. I figured that I had incorrectly set one or more of
the parameters in the BIOS and tried to enter it. However, the system
continued to freeze
whilst in the BIOS, despite all the parameters appearing correct. I checked
the temperatures - they were all within acceptable limits (40C CPU and 30C
case).

To my astonishment, after leaving the system switched off for a day or two I
was able to boot into windows and run all my applications as normal.
Unfortunately this was
shortlived as it soon became apparent that the problem had manifested itself
as apparently random rebooting. The system would boot up fine but simply
reset itself within a
few hours. I disabled the 'automatic restart' feature in Windows and, low
and behold, at each crash I was confronted with the blue screen of death
with details about the
crash. The technical info generally consisted of:

Stop 0x0000008E (0xC0000005 0xEF85037E 0xED2B87C4 0x00000000)
tcpip.sys Address EF85037E base at EF84D000 datestamp 41107ecf

After rebooting I checked the event log, which sure enough, was populated
with 'Save Dump' events (corresponding to each crash) which pointed to a
dump file. The contents
of the dump file simply confirmed the above info, which seemed to indicate a
memory problem. However, running memtest86 for several hours did not yield a
single error, so I
have now dismissed the memory from the potential causes.

After bearing with the random reboots for several weeks, I have recently
attempted to return the BIOS to the former revision. Bizarrely enough the
problem seems to have
cycled: continual failure to boot into Windows followed by random
blue-screen crashes when Windows finally boots. Also, whenever I attempt to
de-clock the CPU back to stock
speeds it freezes during startup (and in the BIOS) again.

I've dismissed any software/driver/virus problems because the system freezes
in the BIOS, before any of those things have a chance to affect the system.
What with all the
wierd freezing during start-up and in the BIOS after updating it, I'm
inclined to believe that the details of the random rebooting are not really
indicative of the problem
- just merely another manifestation.

I've also dismissed the PSU as the problem as there would be no way that
Windows could write a memory dump to the hard-drive if the power was cut
(correct?) Does it sound
like these symptoms are indicative of power fluctuations? The voltages
applied to the system appear ok.

So I believe I'm left with either the CPU or the motherboard as the source
of this problem. Is it possible that my CPU was affected during the BIOS
update (I don't think
it's possible), or perhaps the CPU started failing at that point by pure
coincidence (very unlikely)?

So my best guess is that it's the motherboard. Has the flash rom been
corrupted during the BIOS update? (Is there a way to reset my motherboard
back to 'factory settings'?)
Could it be a capacitor failure (or some other difficult-to-determine
component)? Or is it as simple as a faulty CMOS battery? I have absolutely
no idea. What about the GPU
- have I dismissed it prematurely? Could a faulty GPU cause such problems in
the BIOS?

One thing that bothers me is the 'settle time' that my PC seems to require
before it successfully boots into Windows after updating the BIOS. What
could possibly cause
this?

I would be very grateful to anyone who can provide me with advice as to the
likely cause of this problem. Any suggestions for fixes or potential faulty
components are most
welcome. Ultimately, I don't mind if I need to replace a burnt-out
component, but without knowing which component is at fault I'm stuck.

Many thanks in advance,

Andrew.
 
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C

Chris

After flashing the BIOS it is sometimes required to reinstall XP! Now the
question is, why are you cross posting to so many NGs? >:-(


Andrew Beard said:
Please forgive the length of this post - I thought that the more information
I provided, the easier it will be to diagnose the problem.

Approximately one month ago I conducted a complete reformat and reinstall of
Windows XP SP2 (from a slip-streamed CD) onto my system with specs as
follows:

CPU: AMD Athlon XP-M (Mobile) 2500+ (running at 200MHz FSB x 11)
Mobo: Abit NF7-S v2 nForce2 Ultra
RAM: 1x Crucial 512MB PC3200
GPU: Sapphire Radeon Atlantis 9800 Pro (128MB)
PSU: Chieftec 360W
HD: Western Digital 160GB 7200rpm HD

After installing Windows, the critical hardware drivers, virus protection
(Norton AntiVirus 2005) and the recommended Windows updates, the system was
running fine (as it
always has done). I then decided I should update the BIOS on my motherboard.
As I have done so many times before, I downloaded the appropriate file from
Abit and followed
their instructions to the letter. After clearing the CMOS for a full minute
I restarted the PC. This is when the problems began.

The computer seemed to freeze at random points during the boot stages -
before Windows even starts to load. Sometimes it would only get as far as
determining the speed of
the CPU before freezing. I figured that I had incorrectly set one or more of
the parameters in the BIOS and tried to enter it. However, the system
continued to freeze
whilst in the BIOS, despite all the parameters appearing correct. I checked
the temperatures - they were all within acceptable limits (40C CPU and 30C
case).

To my astonishment, after leaving the system switched off for a day or two I
was able to boot into windows and run all my applications as normal.
Unfortunately this was
shortlived as it soon became apparent that the problem had manifested itself
as apparently random rebooting. The system would boot up fine but simply
reset itself within a
few hours. I disabled the 'automatic restart' feature in Windows and, low
and behold, at each crash I was confronted with the blue screen of death
with details about the
crash. The technical info generally consisted of:

Stop 0x0000008E (0xC0000005 0xEF85037E 0xED2B87C4 0x00000000)
tcpip.sys Address EF85037E base at EF84D000 datestamp 41107ecf

After rebooting I checked the event log, which sure enough, was populated
with 'Save Dump' events (corresponding to each crash) which pointed to a
dump file. The contents
of the dump file simply confirmed the above info, which seemed to indicate a
memory problem. However, running memtest86 for several hours did not yield a
single error, so I
have now dismissed the memory from the potential causes.

After bearing with the random reboots for several weeks, I have recently
attempted to return the BIOS to the former revision. Bizarrely enough the
problem seems to have
cycled: continual failure to boot into Windows followed by random
blue-screen crashes when Windows finally boots. Also, whenever I attempt to
de-clock the CPU back to stock
speeds it freezes during startup (and in the BIOS) again.

I've dismissed any software/driver/virus problems because the system freezes
in the BIOS, before any of those things have a chance to affect the system.
What with all the
wierd freezing during start-up and in the BIOS after updating it, I'm
inclined to believe that the details of the random rebooting are not really
indicative of the problem
- just merely another manifestation.

I've also dismissed the PSU as the problem as there would be no way that
Windows could write a memory dump to the hard-drive if the power was cut
(correct?) Does it sound
like these symptoms are indicative of power fluctuations? The voltages
applied to the system appear ok.

So I believe I'm left with either the CPU or the motherboard as the source
of this problem. Is it possible that my CPU was affected during the BIOS
update (I don't think
it's possible), or perhaps the CPU started failing at that point by pure
coincidence (very unlikely)?

So my best guess is that it's the motherboard. Has the flash rom been
corrupted during the BIOS update? (Is there a way to reset my motherboard
back to 'factory settings'?)
Could it be a capacitor failure (or some other difficult-to-determine
component)? Or is it as simple as a faulty CMOS battery? I have absolutely
no idea. What about the GPU
- have I dismissed it prematurely? Could a faulty GPU cause such problems in
the BIOS?

One thing that bothers me is the 'settle time' that my PC seems to require
before it successfully boots into Windows after updating the BIOS. What
could possibly cause
this?

I would be very grateful to anyone who can provide me with advice as to the
likely cause of this problem. Any suggestions for fixes or potential faulty
components are most
welcome. Ultimately, I don't mind if I need to replace a burnt-out
component, but without knowing which component is at fault I'm stuck.

Many thanks in advance,

Andrew.




-----------== Posted via Newsfeed.Com - Uncensored Usenet News ==----------
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L

Leon Rowell

Hi Andrew,

I would first check the CMOS reset jumper to make sure it is on pins
1&2 & that you didn't accidentally miss getting it on one of the pins
when you replaced it. Also check the ribbon cables to make sure you
didn't knock one loose while working on the inside. Just some
thoughts....

Leon Rowell
 
T

tom

Andrew Beard said:
Please forgive the length of this post - I thought that the more
information I provided, the easier it will be to diagnose the problem.

Approximately one month ago I conducted a complete reformat and reinstall
of Windows XP SP2 (from a slip-streamed CD) onto my system with specs as
follows:

CPU: AMD Athlon XP-M (Mobile) 2500+ (running at 200MHz FSB x 11)
Mobo: Abit NF7-S v2 nForce2 Ultra
RAM: 1x Crucial 512MB PC3200
GPU: Sapphire Radeon Atlantis 9800 Pro (128MB)
PSU: Chieftec 360W
HD: Western Digital 160GB 7200rpm HD

After installing Windows, the critical hardware drivers, virus protection
(Norton AntiVirus 2005) and the recommended Windows updates, the system
was running fine (as it
always has done). I then decided I should update the BIOS on my
motherboard. As I have done so many times before, I downloaded the
appropriate file from Abit and followed
their instructions to the letter. After clearing the CMOS for a full
minute I restarted the PC. This is when the problems began.

The computer seemed to freeze at random points during the boot stages -
before Windows even starts to load. Sometimes it would only get as far as
determining the speed of
the CPU before freezing. I figured that I had incorrectly set one or more
of the parameters in the BIOS and tried to enter it. However, the system
continued to freeze
whilst in the BIOS, despite all the parameters appearing correct. I
checked the temperatures - they were all within acceptable limits (40C CPU
and 30C case).

To my astonishment, after leaving the system switched off for a day or two
I was able to boot into windows and run all my applications as normal.
Unfortunately this was
shortlived as it soon became apparent that the problem had manifested
itself as apparently random rebooting. The system would boot up fine but
simply reset itself within a
few hours. I disabled the 'automatic restart' feature in Windows and, low
and behold, at each crash I was confronted with the blue screen of death
with details about the
crash. The technical info generally consisted of:

Stop 0x0000008E (0xC0000005 0xEF85037E 0xED2B87C4 0x00000000)
tcpip.sys Address EF85037E base at EF84D000 datestamp 41107ecf

After rebooting I checked the event log, which sure enough, was populated
with 'Save Dump' events (corresponding to each crash) which pointed to a
dump file. The contents
of the dump file simply confirmed the above info, which seemed to indicate
a memory problem. However, running memtest86 for several hours did not
yield a single error, so I
have now dismissed the memory from the potential causes.

After bearing with the random reboots for several weeks, I have recently
attempted to return the BIOS to the former revision. Bizarrely enough the
problem seems to have
cycled: continual failure to boot into Windows followed by random
blue-screen crashes when Windows finally boots. Also, whenever I attempt
to de-clock the CPU back to stock
speeds it freezes during startup (and in the BIOS) again.

I've dismissed any software/driver/virus problems because the system
freezes in the BIOS, before any of those things have a chance to affect
the system. What with all the
wierd freezing during start-up and in the BIOS after updating it, I'm
inclined to believe that the details of the random rebooting are not
really indicative of the problem
- just merely another manifestation.

I've also dismissed the PSU as the problem as there would be no way that
Windows could write a memory dump to the hard-drive if the power was cut
(correct?) Does it sound
like these symptoms are indicative of power fluctuations? The voltages
applied to the system appear ok.

So I believe I'm left with either the CPU or the motherboard as the source
of this problem. Is it possible that my CPU was affected during the BIOS
update (I don't think
it's possible), or perhaps the CPU started failing at that point by pure
coincidence (very unlikely)?

So my best guess is that it's the motherboard. Has the flash rom been
corrupted during the BIOS update? (Is there a way to reset my motherboard
back to 'factory settings'?)
Could it be a capacitor failure (or some other difficult-to-determine
component)? Or is it as simple as a faulty CMOS battery? I have absolutely
no idea. What about the GPU
- have I dismissed it prematurely? Could a faulty GPU cause such problems
in the BIOS?

One thing that bothers me is the 'settle time' that my PC seems to require
before it successfully boots into Windows after updating the BIOS. What
could possibly cause
this?

I would be very grateful to anyone who can provide me with advice as to
the likely cause of this problem. Any suggestions for fixes or potential
faulty components are most
welcome. Ultimately, I don't mind if I need to replace a burnt-out
component, but without knowing which component is at fault I'm stuck.

Many thanks in advance,

Andrew.

If I were you I'd go into BIOS setup and see if any settings (memory
timings, etc.) were changed by the reflash. Hopefully, you have these
critical settings documented somewhere.

If that doesn't work, flash back to your previous BIOS version...

Yeah...you're probably like a lot of posters here (me included) who do goofy
stuff to a perfectly good setup...trying to "improve" it somehow :)
 
T

Thomas Wendell

The only missing thing from your report is the crucial one: have you done a
repair install of XP??
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;315341

It is needed after a BIOS update, XP thinks it's on a new mobo after it....


--
Tumppi
Reply to group
=================================================
Most learned on nntp://news.mircosoft.com
Helsinki, Finland (remove _NOSPAM)
(translations from FI/SE not always accurate)
=================================================
 
B

Browser Joe

Not necessarily, I've done 3 bios updates on my mobo (for what reason, i
dunno) and I haven't had any problems, and I'm overclocked pretty good
(xp 2000 @2.1ghz @133fsb)
 
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A

allan

I would be very grateful to anyone who can provide me with advice as to the
likely cause of this problem. Any suggestions for fixes or potential faulty
components are most
welcome. Ultimately, I don't mind if I need to replace a burnt-out
component, but without knowing which component is at fault I'm stuck.

Many thanks in advance,

Andrew.

Make sure that the mainsupply cord between the psu and the motherboard are plugged in properly
to the motherboard.Mine was burnt and partly melted as a result of bad
contact.I had that for a few months causing random reboots and finally
it failed to boot at all.I had to replace the psu and the motherboard as
they where damaged of heat caused by this error.
al
 
D

David Maynard

Thomas said:
The only missing thing from your report is the crucial one: have you done a
repair install of XP??
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;315341

It is needed after a BIOS update, XP thinks it's on a new mobo after it....

Even if it were the case that XP thought it was on a 'different/new'
motherboard it would only need reactivation, not a repair install, as the
hardware is still the same.

What *can* create problems is if the flash changes certain BIOS settings,
such as enabling/disabling APIC vs the state one had it in before the
flash, because that alters the basic operation of, in the case of APIC, the
IRQ subsystem. Putting the parameter back to the expected value corrects it
though, without any 'repair' install. (you can have this same problem from
simply losing CMOS),
 
F

Flow

David Maynard said:
Even if it were the case that XP thought it was on a 'different/new'
motherboard it would only need reactivation, not a repair install, as the
hardware is still the same.

What *can* create problems is if the flash changes certain BIOS settings,
such as enabling/disabling APIC vs the state one had it in before the
flash, because that alters the basic operation of, in the case of APIC, the
IRQ subsystem. Putting the parameter back to the expected value corrects it
though, without any 'repair' install. (you can have this same problem from
simply losing CMOS),

If this setting was altered by the bios flash you need to reinstall XP.
Your system can only run with the setting that was used at install.
Also make sure you use the correct bios settings for cpu and the likes,maybe
voltage is now too high?
Allthough heating may not seem a problem,too high voltage on a mobile would
make things rather instable.
Maybe this new bios makes some hidden settings too high for a 200fsb
setting?Try 166fsb.
Best advice is already given,flash back to your previous bios,you have
backed it up with the flash program i hope?
 
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H

- HAL9000

With this delay of a day, its hard to think that the problem is
something other than hardware - not the bios version or the
install/repair install of windows

Normally the most likely culprit (failed component) is the power
supply but in this case it sounds more like the motherboard (unstable
when de-clocked). Perhaps the PWM circuit giving power to the cpu.

Be careful to follow the ESD procedures in your motherboard manual
too.

Forrest

Motherboard Help By HAL web site:
http://home.comcast.net/~mobo.help/


On Sun, 19 Dec 2004 23:09:05 +0000 (UTC), "Andrew Beard"


To my astonishment, after leaving the system switched off for a day or two I
was able to boot into windows and run all my applications as normal.
< snip >
 
M

Michael Thomas

Stop 0x0000008E (0xC0000005 0xEF85037E 0xED2B87C4 0x00000000)
tcpip.sys Address EF85037E base at EF84D000 datestamp 41107ecf

Disable the network device(s) on the board and see if your problem
goes away. tcpip.sys is a network driver. Make sure that you have
downloaded and installed the correct BIOS for the particular board.
Looks to me like the built-in network device is what's causing the
error.

MT
 
D

David Maynard

Flow said:
done a



If this setting was altered by the bios flash you need to reinstall XP.

The simpler solution is to put the settings back in the same state they
were in for the original install, rather than doing a new one.
 
W

Woger MKII

Please forgive the length of this post - I thought that the more information
I provided, the easier it will be to diagnose the problem.

Approximately one month ago I conducted a complete reformat and reinstall of
Windows XP SP2 (from a slip-streamed CD) onto my system with specs as
follows:

CPU: AMD Athlon XP-M (Mobile) 2500+ (running at 200MHz FSB x 11)
Mobo: Abit NF7-S v2 nForce2 Ultra
RAM: 1x Crucial 512MB PC3200
GPU: Sapphire Radeon Atlantis 9800 Pro (128MB)
PSU: Chieftec 360W
HD: Western Digital 160GB 7200rpm HD

After installing Windows, the critical hardware drivers, virus protection
(Norton AntiVirus 2005) and the recommended Windows updates, the system was
running fine (as it
always has done). I then decided I should update the BIOS on my motherboard.
As I have done so many times before, I downloaded the appropriate file from
Abit and followed
their instructions to the letter. After clearing the CMOS for a full minute
I restarted the PC. This is when the problems began.



Did you set the Factory Defaults..?

This is a MUST DO..
 
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R

Ric

Andrew said:
Please forgive the length of this post - I thought that the more
information I provided, the easier it will be to diagnose the problem.

Approximately one month ago I conducted a complete reformat and
reinstall of Windows XP SP2 (from a slip-streamed CD) onto my system
with specs as follows:

CPU: AMD Athlon XP-M (Mobile) 2500+ (running at 200MHz FSB x 11)
Mobo: Abit NF7-S v2 nForce2 Ultra
RAM: 1x Crucial 512MB PC3200
GPU: Sapphire Radeon Atlantis 9800 Pro (128MB)
PSU: Chieftec 360W
HD: Western Digital 160GB 7200rpm HD

After installing Windows, the critical hardware drivers, virus
protection (Norton AntiVirus 2005) and the recommended Windows
updates, the system was running fine (as it
always has done). I then decided I should update the BIOS on my
motherboard. As I have done so many times before, I downloaded the
appropriate file from Abit and followed
their instructions to the letter. After clearing the CMOS for a full
minute I restarted the PC. This is when the problems began.

The computer seemed to freeze at random points during the boot stages
- before Windows even starts to load. Sometimes it would only get as
far as determining the speed of
the CPU before freezing. I figured that I had incorrectly set one or
more of the parameters in the BIOS and tried to enter it. However,
the system continued to freeze
whilst in the BIOS, despite all the parameters appearing correct. I
checked the temperatures - they were all within acceptable limits
(40C CPU and 30C case).

To my astonishment, after leaving the system switched off for a day
or two I was able to boot into windows and run all my applications as
normal. Unfortunately this was
shortlived as it soon became apparent that the problem had manifested
itself as apparently random rebooting. The system would boot up fine
but simply reset itself within a
few hours. I disabled the 'automatic restart' feature in Windows and,
low and behold, at each crash I was confronted with the blue screen
of death with details about the
crash. The technical info generally consisted of:

Stop 0x0000008E (0xC0000005 0xEF85037E 0xED2B87C4 0x00000000)
tcpip.sys Address EF85037E base at EF84D000 datestamp 41107ecf

After rebooting I checked the event log, which sure enough, was
populated with 'Save Dump' events (corresponding to each crash) which
pointed to a dump file. The contents
of the dump file simply confirmed the above info, which seemed to
indicate a memory problem. However, running memtest86 for several
hours did not yield a single error, so I
have now dismissed the memory from the potential causes.

After bearing with the random reboots for several weeks, I have
recently attempted to return the BIOS to the former revision.
Bizarrely enough the problem seems to have
cycled: continual failure to boot into Windows followed by random
blue-screen crashes when Windows finally boots. Also, whenever I
attempt to de-clock the CPU back to stock
speeds it freezes during startup (and in the BIOS) again.

I've dismissed any software/driver/virus problems because the system
freezes in the BIOS, before any of those things have a chance to
affect the system. What with all the
wierd freezing during start-up and in the BIOS after updating it, I'm
inclined to believe that the details of the random rebooting are not
really indicative of the problem
- just merely another manifestation.

I've also dismissed the PSU as the problem as there would be no way
that Windows could write a memory dump to the hard-drive if the power
was cut (correct?) Does it sound
like these symptoms are indicative of power fluctuations? The voltages
applied to the system appear ok.

So I believe I'm left with either the CPU or the motherboard as the
source of this problem. Is it possible that my CPU was affected
during the BIOS update (I don't think
it's possible), or perhaps the CPU started failing at that point by
pure coincidence (very unlikely)?

So my best guess is that it's the motherboard. Has the flash rom been
corrupted during the BIOS update? (Is there a way to reset my
motherboard back to 'factory settings'?)
Could it be a capacitor failure (or some other difficult-to-determine
component)? Or is it as simple as a faulty CMOS battery? I have
absolutely no idea. What about the GPU
- have I dismissed it prematurely? Could a faulty GPU cause such
problems in the BIOS?

One thing that bothers me is the 'settle time' that my PC seems to
require before it successfully boots into Windows after updating the
BIOS. What could possibly cause
this?

I would be very grateful to anyone who can provide me with advice as
to the likely cause of this problem. Any suggestions for fixes or
potential faulty components are most
welcome. Ultimately, I don't mind if I need to replace a burnt-out
component, but without knowing which component is at fault I'm stuck.

Many thanks in advance,

Andrew.

RAM timings? nforce2 and NF-7 mobos in particular are VERY PICKY INDEED
about RAM...and later BIOS revisions were released to in theory improve
compatibility - it didn't as far as i could tell, but they did change the
way SPD works. try manually setting your RAM settings as per Crucial's
specs rather than relying on SPD to sort it.
failing that, you can downflash with Abit's utility i think.

ric
 

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