Problem with ICS setup - "Cannot enable shared access"


G

Guest

I recently installed XP service pack 2 on two computers in the following
network:

XP "host" with two network cards, connected to an XP laptop on the "home"
network card. I used to have static IP addresses on my home network but do
not insist in keeping them.

Since I installed SP2, the laptop doesn't see the internet any more.
Therefore I tried to re-setup ICS.
___

The network setup wizard cannot complete, and says "An error occurred during
the configuration of the network on this computer. ... Please try it
manually..."
___

When attempting to set up ICS on my "host" (right click on the outside
connection -> properties -> Advanced tab -> checking ICS and selecting the
home network -> OK), I get the following answers:
1. "The settings will not be active until you re-dial the connection" seems
to be ok.
2. Next thing happening is a messagebox: "Cannot enable shared access. Error
1722 - The RPC server is not available"

I interpret this message as ICS trying to get in touch with some other
service via a COM interface, however all the services that sound reasonable
are running.
___

A side effect of the above procedure is that the "home"-side connection is
already switched to DHCP and looks very unhappy since there seems no DHCP
server to be running (as ICS hasn't been started properly??). In consequence,
it takes about 2 minutes after reboot before I can reaccess my "Network
connection" folder.
___

Question:
What needs to be set up first: DHCP or ICS?
(for answer "first DHCP": who is the DHCP server?
for answer "first ICS": how can I avoid the error 1722?)

I would apreciate any help.

Thks,
dumbledore
 
Ad

Advertisements

H

Hans-Georg Michna

2. Next thing happening is a messagebox: "Cannot enable shared access. Error
1722 - The RPC server is not available"

dumbledore,

enable the firewall exception for File and Printer Sharing on
the ICS host.
Question:
What needs to be set up first: DHCP or ICS?
(for answer "first DHCP": who is the DHCP server?
for answer "first ICS": how can I avoid the error 1722?)

This question cannot be answered. The truth is that you only set
up ICS, which always automatically includes a DHCP server.

If this doesn't solve your problem, please use
http://www.michna.com/kb/wxnet.htm to solve any remaining
networking problems.

Hans-Georg
 
M

Marc Reynolds [MSFT]

Try this:

1. Make sure ICS is unchecked
2. Reboot the XP PC
3. Enable ICS.

--

Thanks,
Marc Reynolds
Microsoft Technical Support

This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.
 
G

Guest

Hi Hans-Georg,
thanks a lot for the link to your web page where I found the crucial pieces
of information: It turned out that the TCP/IP NetBios Helper service hasn't
been running on my (now, not then) ICS host. Most likely that was the "RPC
server" that hasn't been found. With a restart of the DHCP client and one of
the netsh reset commands eveything works fine by now.
Best regards (und Grüße aus Gmund),
dumbledore
 
H

Hans-Georg Michna

thanks a lot for the link to your web page where I found the crucial pieces
of information: It turned out that the TCP/IP NetBios Helper service hasn't
been running on my (now, not then) ICS host. Most likely that was the "RPC
server" that hasn't been found. With a restart of the DHCP client and one of
the netsh reset commands eveything works fine by now.

dumbledore,

thanks for reporting!

I'd also check for spyware, for example using the free SpyBot
program.

Viele Grüße---Hans-Georg
 
C

Chuck

dumbledore,

thanks for reporting!

I'd also check for spyware, for example using the free SpyBot
program.

Viele Grüße---Hans-Georg

HG,

When you give advice in cases where malware (adware / spyware) is suspect, and
you recommend only Spybot S&D, you may be shortchanging those who take your
advice as authoritative.

I use SSD myself, regularly. But I know that it does not provide complete
protection from spyware, in any case. In some cases, it does not provide even
good partial protection. Eric Howes is one of the authorities in spyware
detection. See:
<http://spywarewarrior.com/asw-test-results-5.htm> (using, as a reference):
<http://spywarewarrior.com/asw-test-guide.htm#detections3>

In cases where crapware (adware, spyware) is a suspect, you would do everybody a
favor to recommend a more robust detection procedure. I recommend the following
free tools, all of which complement each other in coverage:
AdAware <http://www.lavasoftusa.com/>
CWShredder <http://www.majorgeeks.com/download4086.html>
HijackThis <http://www.majorgeeks.com/download.php?det=3155> (AND expert advice)
LSP-Fix and WinsockXPFix <http://www.cexx.org/lspfix.htm>
Spybot S&D <http://www.safer-networking.org/index.php?page=download>
Stinger <http://us.mcafee.com/virusInfo/default.asp?id=stinger>

Please spend some time in forums such as alt.privacy.spyware, before concluding
that Spybot S&D is an effective standalone protective tool.

Cheers,
Chuck
Paranoia comes from experience - and is not necessarily a bad thing.
 
Ad

Advertisements

H

Hans-Georg Michna

On Thu, 21 Oct 2004 08:16:55 +0200, Hans-Georg Michna
When you give advice in cases where malware (adware / spyware) is suspect, and
you recommend only Spybot S&D, you may be shortchanging those who take your
advice as authoritative.

I use SSD myself, regularly. But I know that it does not provide complete
protection from spyware, in any case. In some cases, it does not provide even
good partial protection. Eric Howes is one of the authorities in spyware
detection. See:
<http://spywarewarrior.com/asw-test-results-5.htm> (using, as a reference):
<http://spywarewarrior.com/asw-test-guide.htm#detections3>

Chuck,

you are absolutely right.

My only excuse is that most users will not follow the fully
qualified advice anyway. I'm currently observing newsgroup
participant behavior, and the findings are not very encouraging.

What I observe is that over half of all attempts to help
somebody here in the newsgroups seem to fail. Some of them fail
because the advice is not good, but the vast majority fails
because the advice is not read, not understood, not followed or
followed only in part. Even in those cases where the advice is
not good, the majority of these failures seems to be caused by
poor information given in the original message.

This is why I suspect that the gain from giving a 99% advice,
compared to giving a 90% advice is very small.

Moreover, I usually point people to my web sites, where they are
already directed to fellow MVP Eric L. Howes' web site:

The Anatomy of a "Drive-by-Download" by Eric L. Howes
https://netfiles.uiuc.edu/ehowes/www/dbd-anatomy.htm

I think that's a very interesting read.

In other words, if somebody wants to know, I certainly show the
way.

But I will follow your advice and will extend my recommendation
to that given in Eric L. Howes' web site. At least some
conscientious people may benefit from this.

Thanks for watching over me---nobody is perfect, and I think the
people trying to give advice here are doing well by watching
over each other a bit.

Hans-Georg
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top