printer port wsd?


L

lew

I got a new printer to replace the 9+ yr old laser; replaced
the lan connection with the new printer instead of using the wifi
capability.

Found that win8.1 "found" the printer but using an "wsd" port;
googled wsd port but don't see any "good" explanations as to
the drivers being used.

I have set the Brother HL-L2380DW default to use their PostScript
clone. Now, with window's wsd port did windows use a form of gdi
printer driver? And would have been considered a "windows"
printer & override the printer's settings for output as the printer
also has the capablity of using gdi & pcl...

Anyway, I've installed Brother's PS driver to have win8 see it as
a postscript printer instead of msft making it a "windows printer"?

Got the printer as it is "multi-functional" but without the fax; the
price at BestBuy was at $149.99, at least for a while.
 
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P

Paul

lew said:
I got a new printer to replace the 9+ yr old laser; replaced
the lan connection with the new printer instead of using the wifi
capability.

Found that win8.1 "found" the printer but using an "wsd" port;
googled wsd port but don't see any "good" explanations as to
the drivers being used.

I have set the Brother HL-L2380DW default to use their PostScript
clone. Now, with window's wsd port did windows use a form of gdi
printer driver? And would have been considered a "windows"
printer & override the printer's settings for output as the printer
also has the capablity of using gdi & pcl...

Anyway, I've installed Brother's PS driver to have win8 see it as
a postscript printer instead of msft making it a "windows printer"?

Got the printer as it is "multi-functional" but without the fax; the
price at BestBuy was at $149.99, at least for a while.

I've never heard of this before. But I also don't
install a lot of printers. WSD =

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_Services_for_Devices

It looks like just one aspect of communications with
the printer. And it isn't likely to define PostScript/PCL/GDI
part of it for you.

Paul
 
L

lew

I've never heard of this before. But I also don't
install a lot of printers. WSD =

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_Services_for_Devices

It looks like just one aspect of communications with
the printer. And it isn't likely to define PostScript/PCL/GDI
part of it for you.

Paul

I had never heard of the WSD either as it was brand new to me.

Then wonder what format the text file was sent; or perhaps like
how stuff were sent in the days of dot-matrix printers; or even
what kind of emulation code were sent!

The properties just showed "Brother laser Type1 class driver"; &
as near as I have found is that "laser type1 class" just refers to
epa radiation safety classifications......

Did see about web services at wikipedia & there is a web connect
app for the printer which I didn't install since I didn't want any
web site to send unwanted stuff to the printer. I'm not a fan of
telesales or "websales"(?) calling.

I should get a pdf file for the laptop & have it send it to the printer
as I didn't change the printer setting on the laptop. If it works,
then the printer is doing whatever is needed to convert the file
to print in PostScript.
 
P

Paul

lew said:
I had never heard of the WSD either as it was brand new to me.

Then wonder what format the text file was sent; or perhaps like
how stuff were sent in the days of dot-matrix printers; or even
what kind of emulation code were sent!

The properties just showed "Brother laser Type1 class driver"; &
as near as I have found is that "laser type1 class" just refers to
epa radiation safety classifications......

Did see about web services at wikipedia & there is a web connect
app for the printer which I didn't install since I didn't want any
web site to send unwanted stuff to the printer. I'm not a fan of
telesales or "websales"(?) calling.

I should get a pdf file for the laptop & have it send it to the printer
as I didn't change the printer setting on the laptop. If it works,
then the printer is doing whatever is needed to convert the file
to print in PostScript.

Did you find anything in Device Manager ? Or just that WSD thing ?

If there is a "web application", it should "talk" to the printer, not
to anything else. I get the impression the printer is a "web server",
and that's what the application should talk to.

When they do real Internet stuff, the tendency is to do "Cloud" things,
and preferably, for money. Which would require a lot of registering on
your part, to get set up. Nobody wants to provide services for nothing.
So you're protected by a layer of bureaucracy.

You can also try printing the "test page" on the printer, which would
normally give a local dump by the processor inside the printer. And
give the details of the printer. Such as the current IP address.
And if you're lucky, maybe it'll indicate what flavors (PostScript/PCL)
it accepts.

As for the Windows end, if you use the Advanced button to alter the
printer settings, you might get a hint as to what kind of driver is
being used. You could also try looking for a .ppd file. For example,
I use a PostScript driver, do "Print to File", and use that as a
way to convert documents to PostScript. The driver I installed
put C:\WINDOWS\system32\HP755CM4.PPD on the C drive, for the printer.
And it has information for the printer (the file is text-based inside).
I don't think a PCL printer would use quite the same thing. So that
would be evidence of PostScript support. I don't know of any other
identifying features right off hand.

Paul
 
L

lew

Did you find anything in Device Manager ? Or just that WSD thing ?

If there is a "web application", it should "talk" to the printer, not
to anything else. I get the impression the printer is a "web server",
and that's what the application should talk to.

When they do real Internet stuff, the tendency is to do "Cloud" things,
and preferably, for money. Which would require a lot of registering on
your part, to get set up. Nobody wants to provide services for nothing.
So you're protected by a layer of bureaucracy.

You can also try printing the "test page" on the printer, which would
normally give a local dump by the processor inside the printer. And
give the details of the printer. Such as the current IP address.
And if you're lucky, maybe it'll indicate what flavors (PostScript/PCL)
it accepts.

As for the Windows end, if you use the Advanced button to alter the
printer settings, you might get a hint as to what kind of driver is
being used. You could also try looking for a .ppd file. For example,
I use a PostScript driver, do "Print to File", and use that as a
way to convert documents to PostScript. The driver I installed
put C:\WINDOWS\system32\HP755CM4.PPD on the C drive, for the printer.
And it has information for the printer (the file is text-based inside).
I don't think a PCL printer would use quite the same thing. So that
would be evidence of PostScript support. I don't know of any other
identifying features right off hand.

Paul

The device manager shows a print queue listing NOW & on the print
queue for what m$ did for the printer, the detail list has a "WSD print
driver" version listed; there is also several lines of coded numbers
most likely in hex.

There is now a printer item in the device manager that shows what
printer is connected(?) which is the Brother laser type1 class driver.

The last item on the device manager list is the WSD Print Provider(?).

I did a test print from the laptop only AFTER "add a printer" which
only allowed using the hll2380dw; "added" the printer to a standard
tcp/ip port; had to do this to get the laptop to print anything. The
test pages show .....ta da....shows the print processor as
"winprint".

Will be going back to Brother's site to get the full package as haven't
been able to just install the PS drivers. The limitations of using
"winprint" is huge as I there is no duplex selection or even scaling
a printout. Looks like m$ suckered the printer manufacturers to make
"windows" printers as the default for use in all environments; the
only OS that exists in the universe is windows!

Oh yeah, when the laptop only had the WSD port checked, win8
could not find the printer so that it gives a lie to explanations that
WSD is automatically setup to use the ip for the printer.

Hindsight says this subject should have been in the win8 newsgroup
or cross-posted 3 times......but then how many people get new
printers or are satisfied just to use a "windows printer".
 
P

Paul

lew said:
The device manager shows a print queue listing NOW & on the print
queue for what m$ did for the printer, the detail list has a "WSD print
driver" version listed; there is also several lines of coded numbers
most likely in hex.

There is now a printer item in the device manager that shows what
printer is connected(?) which is the Brother laser type1 class driver.

The last item on the device manager list is the WSD Print Provider(?).

I did a test print from the laptop only AFTER "add a printer" which
only allowed using the hll2380dw; "added" the printer to a standard
tcp/ip port; had to do this to get the laptop to print anything. The
test pages show .....ta da....shows the print processor as
"winprint".

Will be going back to Brother's site to get the full package as haven't
been able to just install the PS drivers. The limitations of using
"winprint" is huge as I there is no duplex selection or even scaling
a printout. Looks like m$ suckered the printer manufacturers to make
"windows" printers as the default for use in all environments; the
only OS that exists in the universe is windows!

Oh yeah, when the laptop only had the WSD port checked, win8
could not find the printer so that it gives a lie to explanations that
WSD is automatically setup to use the ip for the printer.

Hindsight says this subject should have been in the win8 newsgroup
or cross-posted 3 times......but then how many people get new
printers or are satisfied just to use a "windows printer".

If you wanted to study the protocol used, you could try Wireshark.
Since the communications seems to be network based, you might see
the header of the stuff sent to the printer, and figure out the format
from that.

Or, we could try for a Wikipedia article :)

*******

http://www.networksteve.com/forum/t...roubles_with_Microsoft/?TopicId=40790&Posts=2

"Most new printers support WSD so if one does not specifically
select TCP/IP Device from the drop down list you can wind up
with a WSD port."

Implying there may have been some way to select something other
than WSD. Maybe it's uninstall/reinstall time ? Or, if you have
a System Restore point, and haven't changed or added a lot f files
to the system since doing this, take the system back to before
the printer was added and the driver porridge added.

OK, here's an idea.

http://www.fixya.com/support/t219135-switch_from_offline_status_online

"Open the printers folder.

Right-click on the Brother printer and display the Properties page

Select the Ports tab.

In my system (Vista Premium), the selected port was a WSD port
(whatever that means). Further down the list, there was a TCP/IP port
that was obviously created by the Brother installation software. I
selected the Brother-created TCP/IP port (which deselected the WSD port),
applied the changes, and suddenly my printer was online. No idea what
the difference between these two ports is, but I'll stick with the
TCP/IP port until further notice.
"

So apparently it is configurable after installation. No need to
panic even. Who knows what protocol you'll eventually end up using...

Paul
 
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L

lew

..............lots skipped............
If you wanted to study the protocol used, you could try Wireshark.
Since the communications seems to be network based, you might see
the header of the stuff sent to the printer, and figure out the format
from that.

Or, we could try for a Wikipedia article :)

*******

http://www.networksteve.com/forum/t...roubles_with_Microsoft/?TopicId=40790&Posts=2

"Most new printers support WSD so if one does not specifically
select TCP/IP Device from the drop down list you can wind up
with a WSD port."

Implying there may have been some way to select something other
than WSD. Maybe it's uninstall/reinstall time ? Or, if you have
a System Restore point, and haven't changed or added a lot f files
to the system since doing this, take the system back to before
the printer was added and the driver porridge added.

OK, here's an idea.

http://www.fixya.com/support/t219135-switch_from_offline_status_online

"Open the printers folder.

Right-click on the Brother printer and display the Properties page

Select the Ports tab.

In my system (Vista Premium), the selected port was a WSD port
(whatever that means). Further down the list, there was a TCP/IP port
that was obviously created by the Brother installation software. I
selected the Brother-created TCP/IP port (which deselected the WSD port),
applied the changes, and suddenly my printer was online. No idea what
the difference between these two ports is, but I'll stick with the
TCP/IP port until further notice.
"

So apparently it is configurable after installation. No need to
panic even. Who knows what protocol you'll eventually end up using...

Paul
On the destop, I had installed the Brother "full" driver package which
included printer management; the package goes thru to install the
drivers, but had to check/select the PS drivers; however, it didn't use
the windows installer(?) & so all is well there. I have since removed
the m$ installed printer which in turn delected the WSD port.

On the laptop, I had to do the same procedure. The thing is that
windows sees the printer id most likely with the wsd "markings"(?)
& won't let me just installed the PS driver. The "have disk" box
doesn't appear for me to select; win8.1 insisted that I use what it
found which is using a "windows printer" driver. I was able to select
a new port & delete the wsd port to get the printer working somewhat
but it was still a windows printer.

Looks to me that m$ has confiscated the printer access like they did
with usb 3 in win8 for the drivers. Will need to question Brother
about another method to add the printer drivers as the step for
"add printer" won't work as the "have disk" option isn't displayed.

Hope win 10 gets this fixed or there will lots of unhappy people.

An interesting thing is that the Device Manager no longer have a
printer item on the list! Also references to wsd port or wsd printer
are no longer listed as the wsd port was deleted by win8.1 after I
removed the wsd printer from the Devices and Printers screen.
 
L

lew

On Wed, 5 Nov 2014 17:03:36 +0000 (UTC), lew


| On the destop, I had installed the Brother "full" driver package which
| included printer management; the package goes thru to install the
| drivers, but had to check/select the PS drivers; however, it didn't use
| the windows installer(?) & so all is well there. I have since removed
| the m$ installed printer which in turn delected the WSD port.

When I have suitable fresh drivers in hand that are supplied by the manufacturer of
new hardware I'm installing, I never allow Windows to install a driver for it. I've
found that 8.1 does a great job of coming up with drivers to accommodate older
hardware, though. Better than any previous Windows version by far.

Larc

Win8 installed its drivers before I was able to do anything;
i.e. I had disconnected the old printer & connected the new printer;
went to add printer & the wsd is listed! win8 evidently did a scan
for new hardware & found & created wsd port. Oh yes, the printer
isn't listed by m$ as it is too new, "just became available" & I
got the $50 off either because of new model sale or
pre-Black Friday sale by Best Buy. Whatever, $149.99 is a good buy
for a laser printer that has auto duplex, scanner & copying while
having usb, ethernet, wifi & "NFC" capabilities.

Unfortunately, the printer can be also a print server as Paul
surmises as it can be used for "cloud" printing.


Most other printers I've used had to go thru windows to install
the printer drivers as in the "have disk" setting; didn't get
there even for "updating" drivers as the box wasn't available
to check. m$ may have the new printer listed in a few months..
 
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P

Paul

lew said:
Win8 installed its drivers before I was able to do anything;

The only point I'd make about this, is there are two
ways to install drivers.

1) Some products in the manual, tell you to install
the drivers first, *then* plug in the product.
2) Other products, state to connect the product first,
then install the drivers.

(1) works, if the driver doesn't need to sense Plug and Play
information for it to "take".

(2) is done that way, because the driver is old fashioned,
an INF is presented to the system, Plug and Play sees a
match for some undiscovered hardware, and hooks things together.
Some old driver packages would refuse to install, unless
they spot a matching VEN/DEV.

Any time I work with USB items, I check the instructions first
to see whether it's a (1) or (2) type device. I think my printer,
I had to install the printer software first. Then a cute graphical
animation pops up on the screen, enticing me to plug in the
USB cable to the printer.

In cases where you violate the order stated in the manual,
Windows can assign a default or generic driver, fouling
everything up. As the generic driver is very greedy, and
it can be difficult to "kick it out".

Paul
 

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