new system bootup woes


A

Adam

Rodney Pont said:
You have connected the secondary ATX power connector haven't you? I was
just reading the Asus X99-Pro manual and noticed it said that the
system wouldn't boot without it being connected.
Thanks, and yes, "both" ATX power connectors (24-pin EATXPWR 2x12 and
8-pin EATX12V 2x4) are connected to mobo.

 
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D

DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno

Nice newsreader, Fixadent.
Nice lame nym stupidity, jackass.
Good job.
As if the assessment of a pure putz like you matters.
If your gonna use Linux, suffer with the rest of us.
WTF are you jacking off at the mouth about, dumbfuck?
You have no clue what platform I have up right now. This stupid,
childish retard post of yours here is proof of that.

You know there are about six PC in this room alone, right?

You're an idiot. Nothing changed about the group's original
assessment. Putzzilla is all you'll ever be, and all you'll ever suffer
through... all alone.
 
D

DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno

And if it's too low, but not zero, the power supply will probably come
up and something will catch fire.

Absolute nonsense.

Your grasp of electronics is too low... below zero even.
 
A

Adam

Paul said:
Material is screened onto the Intel-provided heatsinks.

Third party kits tend to leave it to your
imagination. They provide a tube of stuff
(so it's not already applied to the heatsink),
and the people who are prone to buying third-party
coolers (me), provide their own tube of favored stuff.

I use the rice grain method, then use an inspection mirror
to check that the paste made it all the way to the
edge of the gap between CPU and heatsink. You want
to "see white" where the gap is, but not "see stuff
oozing all over the place" as that means you applied
too much.

The purpose of paste is to fill any air gaps or blemishes
in the surface, so the two surfaces are in contact with
one another. Building an "Oreo-cookie" defeats the
purpose, by increasing the thermal resistance through
the excess paste.

More info here. While I started by using the credit
card method, I've since switched to the rice grain
(middle dot) method.

http://www.arcticsilver.com/methods.html

Some paste products are thick enough to be like
cookie dough. And are just about impossible to install
properly. They do that, to prevent "pump-out", but
there's a limit to how thick the stuff should be.

Paul
Thanks for the link. I plan to apply about
the size of one uncooked white rice grain of
"Arctic Silver 5 Polysynthetic Silver Thermal Compound Paste"
to center of CPU.
 
V

VanguardLH

Adam said:
...


Will clean both surfaces and apply ...
"Arctic Silver 5 Polysynthetic Silver Thermal Compound Paste"
Artic Silver is usually a waste of money. You pay for glitz that won't
return much for reduction in temperature. It's for overclockers where a
reduction of 1 to 3 degrees is perceived as a great reward on their
endeavor. Those that go with Silver should also lap the heatsink and
CPU plate to make sure they are really flat and have as much metal-to-
metal contact as possible with the Silver only filling in the
microscopic air gaps. Lapping takes a lot of time not only to get the
surfaces flat but also to get them to a high reflective polish. Artic
Alumina Ceramic is probably your best choice and a bit cheaper per gram.
Is it common practice to do what you suggest?
What, to apply voltage to a fan to see if it spins? If the BIOS sees
zero RPM for the CPU fan (because the fan doesn't spin or the fan wasn't
connected to the CPU mobo header) then the computer is immediately
shutdown. So if getting the PC to power up is a problem and you're
stuck doing micro troubleshooting (the big suspects have been
eliminated) then, yes, testing the CPU will spin when powered is a
reasonable troubleshooting step. Even if it spins, rotating it with
your finger will let you know if there are any rough spots which might
cause the fan to snag there and not let it spin if that's where the fan
happens to land when the computer is powered down.
 
A

Adam

Dustin said:
DanS <t.h.i.s.n.t.h.a.t@r.o.a.d.r.u.n.n.e.r.c.o.m>
Mon, 22 Dec
2014 13:59:55 GMT in alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt, wrote the
following message:


It was usually a system brought in that wasn't one of mine. The client
ordered all of the parts online, tried to assemble it and failed to
complete the mission. They took it to me, I'd get it up and going for
them, when possible. In some cases, I couldn't do much to help them,
because they'd already blown components trying to assemble it.

I've had two clients bring in motherboards where you can clearly see
capacitors once lived. When you ask these people what happened; they
give you the shoulder shrug with an 'I don't know' answer.

They follow this up by 'it should be under warranty though, right?'.
Do I need to upload photos to prove that I did not mess up the mobo? :)
 
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D

DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno

Do I need to upload photos to prove that I did not mess up the mobo?
Simply state how many PCs you have ever "assembled" and how many other,
if any, electronic assemblies of any kind, have you worked with?

If those answers are very low numbers, you could very well have done
something wrong.

This could be as simple as a not quite fully inserted and locked RAM
stick.

Those old, "No user serviceable parts inside." stickers meant something.

Maybe even more now.

But just like a fine wristwatch... you can go buy another one.
Just get an experienced builder or electronics industry personage to build
it for you.
 
A

Adam

Cybe R. Wizard said:
CPU shouldn't be difficult to install at all. Perhaps this is your
problem. I suspect a bent or crushed pin on the CPU.
We shall see but I doubt it.
 
M

mike

Absolute nonsense.

Your grasp of electronics is too low... below zero even.
OK, take the challenge.

Find a 12V supply cap on your motherboard. Pick a feedthru cap so
you can solder a 1-Ohm 1206 resistor on the back side
across the cap. Orient the board so the resistor won't fall
off when the solder melts.
Get out your stop watch and hit the power switch.
Tell us how long it took for something to get really hot.

You'll probably have to use a higher resistance part to have
it hold together long enough to burn the board. I picked the
1-Ohm because I wouldn't want your arrogance to harm an
innocent circuit board.

And it's much more exciting if that's just leakage resistance
in an electrolytic.

Are we having fun yet?
 
D

DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno

CPU shouldn't be difficult to install at all. Perhaps this is your
problem. I suspect a bent or crushed pin on the CPU.

Cybe R. Wizard

Most are flat contact surface these days. They get impinged upon by
barbed contacts in the socket, when it gets locked. Very low chance to
screw it up, but it is possible, I suppose.
 
D

DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno

You'll probably have to use a higher resistance part to have it hold
together long enough to burn the board. I picked the 1-Ohm because I
wouldn't want your arrogance to harm an innocent circuit board.
Idiot. My 20W 1 Ohm resistor would work just fine.

Your pathetic SMD 1/16 W device can fail simply from an oily fingered
**** like you touching it.

You lack the true grasp you need to do this task. It is not a purely
resistive load either.
 
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P

Paul

Adam said:
We shall see but I doubt it.
I notice your board has three different versions.

The latest board (Gen3 R2) has a DirectKey.
As well as a DRCT header.

Does the DirectKey travel work properly ?
Is the button stuck down ?

Is anything connected to the DRCT header ?

My theory is, the front Power button, the DirectKey and
the DRCT header all have similar functions. Some aspect
of them may work in parallel with the others. Maybe the
motherboard considers the button to be depressed all the
time, and that's why it isn't starting. Currently,
pressing the front Power button, is not creating the
single pulse the system expects. Because one of the other
inputs is keeping their button depressed.

Paul
 
M

mike

Idiot. My 20W 1 Ohm resistor would work just fine.
You might want to rethink the math on that one.
Show your work.
Or do the experiment and post some pictures.
Your resistor and a car battery should do for the experiment.
Be to grasp the resistor firmly with both hands.
Your pathetic SMD 1/16 W device
You mean the size of devices that you find on motherboards?

can fail simply from an oily fingered
**** like you touching it.

You lack the true grasp you need to do this task. It is not a purely
resistive load either.
If you're measuring with an ohmmeter, you're measuring the resistive
part. A rocket scientist should know that.

General advice...THINK FIRST...Your finger on that "send" clicker
is too fast for your cognition.
 
A

Adam

Paul said:
I notice your board has three different versions.

The latest board (Gen3 R2) has a DirectKey.
As well as a DRCT header.

Does the DirectKey travel work properly ?
Is the button stuck down ?

Is anything connected to the DRCT header ?

My theory is, the front Power button, the DirectKey and
the DRCT header all have similar functions. Some aspect
of them may work in parallel with the others. Maybe the
motherboard considers the button to be depressed all the
time, and that's why it isn't starting. Currently,
pressing the front Power button, is not creating the
single pulse the system expects. Because one of the other
inputs is keeping their button depressed.

Paul
The mobo version that I own is the one documented by
mobo user manual version E6674,
which does not mention DirectKey or DRCT.

http://www.amazon.com/ASUS-Sabertooth-990FX-SATA-Motherboard/dp/B00539LU3E

https://www.google.com/search?num=50&q=E6674+asus+sabertooth+990fx+pdf&oq=E6674+asus+sabertooth+990fx+pdf&gs_l=serp.3...5758.7049.0.7697.4.4.0.0.0.0.88.312.4.4.0.msedr...0...1c.1.60.serp..3.1.82.pK4yOTFbF2I
 
D

DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno

You might want to rethink the math on that one.
Show your work.

You might.

ONE OHM IS ONE OHM IS ONE OHM. You ****ing idiot.

So YES, the SAME current through MY 20 W capable resistor will roast the
piss out of your 1/16 W item.

Can you really be that thick? What?... dyslexic thought pattern?
Why do you get so many thing so ass backwards?
 
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A

Adam

DecadentLinuxUserNumeroUno said:
Simply state how many PCs you have ever "assembled" and how many other,
if any, electronic assemblies of any kind, have you worked with?

If those answers are very low numbers, you could very well have done
something wrong.

This could be as simple as a not quite fully inserted and locked RAM
stick.

Those old, "No user serviceable parts inside." stickers meant something.

Maybe even more now.

But just like a fine wristwatch... you can go buy another one.
Just get an experienced builder or electronics industry personage to build
it for you.
At this point, the possibilities outweigh the impossibilities.
But, I am "confident" that I did not do anything "callous".

If anything, those fan assembly designs need much improvement to
make CPU installation much less likely to damage the mobo.
 
P

Paul

Adam said:
Manual Early_BIOS Feature Serial?
SABERTOOTH 990FX E6674 2011.06.07 C8xxxxxxxxxx = 2012/09
SABERTOOTH 990FX R2.0 E7335 2012.06.25 DirectKey
SABERTOOTH 990FX/GEN3 R2.0 E8041 2012.12.10 DirectKey

Should the manufacture date on the first generation of board,
occur after the R2.0 is released ? It sounds like somehow
the motherboard was given a newer serial number. If
the board was actually manufactured in 2011, the battery would be
flat now.

I guess when you RMA, you'll find out if there is a problem.
This sounds like something Asus did.

The computer I'm typing this on, the board was relatively
old in terms of the release date. It was stale stock
sitting in some small seller's store. But the manufacture
date, was from the first batch. So someone who isn't selling
a product all that well, they tend to get stuck with the
first batch, rather than dumbly buying a whole bunch near
the end of the manufacturing cycle and getting stuck with
them. They know from their first batch sales,
whether they have any chance of selling a late
batch. And that's why a late serial number
has me scratching my head, in terms of a
justification.

Paul
 
G

Godzilla

Nice lame nym stupidity, jackass.
Look at your stupid name.
Fixadent is faster.
As if the assessment of a pure putz like you matters.
Nothing matters here, doofus.
WTF are you jacking off at the mouth about, dumbfuck?
You have no clue what platform I have up right now. This stupid,
childish retard post of yours here is proof of that.

You know there are about six PC in this room alone, right?
You break into Best Buy or something?
You're an idiot. Nothing changed about the group's original
assessment. Putzzilla is all you'll ever be, and all you'll ever suffer
through... all alone.
Hmmm ... you surround yourself with computers.
You use dozens of distros.
Wonder which one of us is alone.
I'm betting it's you, dork.
--
_____ _______ ____ __ __ _____ _
/ ____|__ __/ __ \| \/ | __ \ | |
| (___ | | | | | | \ / | |__) | | |
\___ \ | | | | | | |\/| | ___/ | |
____) | | | | |__| | | | | | |_|
|_____/ |_| \____/|_| |_|_| (_)
 
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J

Jax

Silver is more electrically conductive than Copper, but I think
the two
are nearly even on thermal conductivity.

Silver filled epoxy is the defacto standard in chip die attach.

That "sinking surface" you attach your heat sink to, has the
actual chip
die attached to the other side of it, flipped, and silver epoxy
mated.
Good info! :)
 

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