Network adaptor going at 10 Mbps not 100 Mbps


N

namsilat

I have a Linksys network card connected to cable modem, and the speed
in status is only 10 Mbps. The card is "suppose" to be a 100 Mbps
card. I went into Advanced, then Media, to manually changing the
speed. When I selected 100 Full Duplex, the connection was cut and
some error message poped up indicating "the cable has been unplugged
from the network". I have no idea what that is. At "auto" option it's
going at 10 Mbps. Any idea?
 
Ad

Advertisements

L

Lemon Jelly

I had a fixed wireless Ethernet connection which defaulted to 10Mbps on
my generic Realtek card. I now have a 4 port Speedtouch adsl router that
connects at 100M which is hardly surprising & I presume most are
auto-switching or capable of 100M. With a single port modem, it doesn't
matter as any traffic will be under 10M. Sounds like justified cost
cutting until 10Mbps becomes inadequate.

Yves Leclerc - typed:
 
Y

Yves Leclerc

The router may support 10/100Mbps but as I said, most cable modem and xDSL
modem top out at 10Mbps. The high speed service has not reach the 10Mbps
transfer speedn so the modems only do 10Mbps.

Y.
 
N

namsilat

What about the speed of the network adaptor with an internal network?
There is no reason why they can't go at 100 Mbps between the two
networked machine, but mine seems to be stuck at 10 Mbps.
 
B

Broomstick

I had the very same problem. In my case the answer lies with the network
cable. The vendor's technician didn't follow the standard in
making/crimping the network cable (it was a crossover cable). But I didn't
know it then and had to content myself with a 10Mbps connection for a
loooong time until one day, while shopping, I found a decent priced crimping
device. Then I made my own network cables (both kinds; crossover and
passthroughs) and I had been living happily on 100Mbps ever since ...

PS: I was really impressed the first time I copied a 250-megabytes file
across the network. It was LIGHTNING fast ! There were only 3 PC in my home
network, mind you. At the time of testing only two PCs are active while the
other one is idling.
By the way, I become a network cable "expert" by reading the information
provided by the generous people at
www.homepcnetwork.com . I hope that site is still around.
 
Ad

Advertisements

N

namsilat

Excellent point... often wer are reminded about how basic some of the
things are missed. So is there any guide how to identify the type of
cables? How do I tell from the markings on the cable what types they
are? Come to think those cables I have now are very old, even before I
got 100 Mbps cards.
 
Ad

Advertisements

B

Broomstick

If you are talking RJ45 cables, there should be cathegorical markings on the
cable - CAT5, CAT5E, etc.
CAT5 cables are sufficient for 100Mbps connection PROVIDED that it is
properly connected to the RJ45 connectors. As I said you can get the details
on the homepcnetwork.com

If I'm not wrong, the latest one is CAT6 cable which is for Gigabit
(1000Mbps) Ethernet (?). I read somewhere though that CAT5E cable may also
be used for 1000Mbps connection (?)

Good Luck & happy Crimping !

namsilat said:
Excellent point... often wer are reminded about how basic some of the
things are missed. So is there any guide how to identify the type of
cables? How do I tell from the markings on the cable what types they
are? Come to think those cables I have now are very old, even before I
got 100 Mbps cards.
<snip>
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top