Linux & Creative


floppybootstomp

sugar 'n spikes
Moderator
Joined
Mar 5, 2002
Messages
20,250
Reaction score
1,753
A couple of months after upgrading my main computer I thought I’d add a sound card. None of the cards I already owned were suitable as they were all PCI whereas I needed a PCI-E version.

On browsing I realised there wasn’t much choice nowadays it was basically Asus or Creative. As I hadn’t used a Creative card for some time I thought I’d try one just for a change. I settled on a mid-range OEM version, a Soundblaster Z which currently costs £50 at OCUK.

Installed it with Win 10 and it was an improvement on the onboard sound, sounded very good to my ears. I use the digital out from the soundcard to a DAC which feeds a MiTube Fatman Valve amplifier and pair of Ariston media loudspeakers.

Life went on for a couple of months and I started getting a yearning to Dual boot with Linux on my new machine. As I’d received a free Kingston 240Gb SSD hard disk with my new video card I had a spare Crucial 250Gb SSD HDD so I thought that would do for Linux Mint, latest version is V18 and I went for Cinnamon 64 Bit.

I fitted a caddy to my computer which can swap 3.5” HDD’s in and out so I had Windows 10 on the Kingston SSD and Mint 18 on the Crucial SSD. To accommodate the SSD’s so they’d fit my new caddy I had to buy a couple of 2.5” to 3.5” HDD converters (see pics).

I installed Linux 18 which was stress free and went perfectly well except for one thing – I had no sound. Linux was recognising the Soundblaster Z but whatever setting I put the soundcard on it would not work. Checking Creative’s website I noticed no Linux drivers were available.

A Google revealed there were a lot off cheesed off Linux/Creative users on this planet as it seemed Creative don’t provide any support for Linux whatsoever. So I rattled off a none too complimentary email to Creative urging them to sort out some Linux drivers and they promised a reply ‘within 48 hours’.

96 hours later Creative sent me a return email stating they don’t support Linux operating systems. Ya don’t say. Crappy useless bunch of idiots (I’m restraining myself here).

So I removed the Creative soundcard, bought a cheap Asus Xonar DGX PCI-E soundcard (£24) and this Asus card works perfectly with both Windows 10 and Linux 18. So that’s it for me, for the rest of my life a complete veto of Creative products.

I am fair-minded enough, however, to admit the Soundblaster Z had the edge on the Asus Xonar DGX, as reflected by the price, probably, but I am being a bit nit-picky.

I’m considering the more expensive Asus card (£125) which is meant to be ‘audiophile’ quality and also has a co-ax digital output which is rare, most cards usually have optical output. This is a desirable feature.

One would think with the gain in popularity of Linux over the past decade Creative might have made a little effort to expand their customer base but no, still living in the dark ages.

The caddy mounted in my computer case:

610.jpg


A converter case:

614.jpg
 
Ad

Advertisements

muckshifter

I'm not weird, I'm a limited edition.
Moderator
Joined
Mar 5, 2002
Messages
25,662
Reaction score
1,158
err, I 'banned' Creative in 1995 ... Philips had far better sound solution. :)
 

V_R

¯\_(ツ)_/¯
Moderator
Joined
Jan 31, 2005
Messages
13,545
Reaction score
1,863
Yeah Creative suck hard in the driver stakes. I had to use the 'Daniel K' modded drivers with my sound card to get them working when I first upgraded to 10 as Creative didn't have the drivers ready at launch....

If I were buying now it would either be an Asus card or an external DAC and forgo a sound card all together. :)
 

Becky

Webmistress
Joined
Mar 25, 2003
Messages
7,424
Reaction score
1,511
One would think with the gain in popularity of Linux over the past decade Creative might have made a little effort to expand their customer base but no, still living in the dark ages.

Well you'd think so wouldn't you?! Eejits :rolleyes:

Glad to hear the Asus card is working out though, but shame about the sound quality.
 

Ian

Administrator
Joined
Feb 23, 2002
Messages
19,750
Reaction score
1,411
I've got the same caddy and converter as you Flops :).

I had some long running driver problems with a Creative sound card (long forgotten the model), it turned out that a long running series of BSODs in XP were down to their drivers. I can barely remember getting a BSOD in years now.

If I were buying now it would either be an Asus card or an external DAC and forgo a sound card all together. :)

How would the DAC work? Can you skip the sound card altogether and get a PC based DAC instead?
 
Ad

Advertisements

Ian

Administrator
Joined
Feb 23, 2002
Messages
19,750
Reaction score
1,411
Ad

Advertisements

V_R

¯\_(ツ)_/¯
Moderator
Joined
Jan 31, 2005
Messages
13,545
Reaction score
1,863
Ah yes, that was the other one I've seen mentioned a few times, both get very positive praise.

Tbh I'm still reading up on whats what, but it seems like a good direction to go in. :)
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top