Insert paragraph between table & heading?


P

Paul

I have a table immediately followed by a (numbered) Heading1
paragraph. I want to put a "Body Text" style paragraph in between
them. If I put the cursor at the very end of the last table row and
press return, all I get is another table row (rather than a new
paragraph). I tried to select the last row and change it to "Body
Text", but that only changed the style within the table cells. It
didn't convert the row into a non-table paragraph.

As another way of inserting a paragraph between the table and the
Heading1 paragraph, I put the cursor just before the first letter of
the Heading1 paragraph and pressed return. That created a Heading1
paragraph just before the original one. Now I can change the new
Heading1 paragraph to Body Text. However, all cross-references to the
original Heading1 paragraph now refer to the new Heading1 paragraph.
When I changed the new Heading1 paragraph to Body Text, all the
aforementioned cross-references became (for example) "see Section 0"
instead of the paragraph number of the original Heading 1 paragraph.

Based on what I've been learning from this newsgroup lately, I realize
there's all sorts of acrobatics one might be able to do with revealing
codes and search/replace, but figuring that out really necessary to
insert a paragraph between a table and a heading?

I'm using Word 2003 on Windows XP. Thanks.
 
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S

Suzanne S. Barnhill

Another approach is to add a row to the table, then right-click in that row
and choose Split Table. This will insert a Normal paragraph between the new
row and the existing table. Then select the new row and press Backspace to
delete.

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
http://word.mvps.org
 
S

Stefan Blom

Select the whole cross-referenced (bookmarked) heading; be sure to include the
paragraph mark that terminates the paragraph. Cut it and paste elsewhere in the
document. Then add the blank paragraph by pressing Enter at the beginning of
what is now the paragraph below the table. Cut and paste the heading back into
position.

The exercise will be easier if you display nonprinting marks which you can do by
pressing the ¶ button on the Standard toolbar. Paragraph marks will display as
pilcrows (¶).
 
P

Paul

Thanks, Stefan, and Suzanne. I also found from trial and error that I
can press Shift-Ctrl-Return at the right end of a table row. That
inserts a Normal paragraph.

Regarding the bit about cross-references to numbered headings, life
sure would be easier if one can turn on visibility of these automatic
bookmarks.
 
S

Suzanne S. Barnhill

Thanks for the tip, but for me that shortcut just splits the table. Even if
you have inserted a new row, you'll still have to delete it, and if you
haven't inserted a new row, then you'll have to drag the split-off row back
up to the table.

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
http://word.mvps.org

Thanks, Stefan, and Suzanne. I also found from trial and error that I
can press Shift-Ctrl-Return at the right end of a table row. That
inserts a Normal paragraph.

Regarding the bit about cross-references to numbered headings, life
sure would be easier if one can turn on visibility of these automatic
bookmarks.
 
S

Stefan Blom

Actually, Ctrl+Shift+Enter inserts a *column* break. As a consequence, the table
will be split (the same thing happens if you insert a manual page break or
section break within a table cell).
 
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P

Paul

This action results in a split table, but I make sure that the stuff
that is split off consists of empty unneeded rows. After adding some
text paragraphs between the two parts of the table, I select the lower
split-off table and "cut" it (it doesn't seem to be deletable).
 
S

Suzanne S. Barnhill

If you select an entire table, you can delete it with Backspace.

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
http://word.mvps.org

This action results in a split table, but I make sure that the stuff
that is split off consists of empty unneeded rows. After adding some
text paragraphs between the two parts of the table, I select the lower
split-off table and "cut" it (it doesn't seem to be deletable).
 
S

Stefan Blom

Since Delete only clears the *contents* of cells, I guess Backspace was a
compromise.

Moreover, note that, years ago, Word Help actually suggested using Cut as a
method to delete a whole table. I don't recall that Help mentioned Backspace...
So the method may not be new only to you!

--
Stefan Blom
Microsoft Word MVP
(Message posted via news.eternal-september.org)



Thanks Suzanne. So many little tricks to know about Word...
 
S

Suzanne S. Barnhill

I think Backspace may have been introduced along with the "table handle."

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
http://word.mvps.org
 
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S

Suzanne S. Barnhill

No, I think the table handle was Word 2000, because that was the first
version in which tables could be wrapped (and of course they become wrapped
if you move them with the table handle, a significant trap for the unwary).

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
http://word.mvps.org
 
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