How Can I Increase My Internet Speed on Windows XP Home E


G

Guest

It seems that Windows XP reserves 20% of the available bandwidth
(i.e. 20% of the Internet available speed) to itself and that's one of the
reasons that we'll never reach our full download speed under this operating
system.

I understand that in Win XP Pro there is a fix, tweaking the gpedit.msc,
under the Administrative Templates, Network, QoS Packet Scheduler.
If we, double click Limit reservable bandwidth, and change this
configuration from “not configured†to “Enabled†and the reduce Bandwidth
limit (%) from 20% to zero, this might help speed up the speed.

Of course, this option is helpful if you have already checked the following:

- The labeled speed of your Internet connection is its maximum speed, not
meaning that you will be able to always get that download speed. Your
broadband operator only guarantees this speed between your home (or office)
and their network.
- High traffic on your service provider network.
- High traffic on the server you are downloading a file.
- Speed limit on the server you are downloading a file (e.g. if the server
has its download speed limited to 2 Mbps you won’t be able to reach a higher
speed than that).
- Route from your home or office to the server where the file is located.
- Your Internet connection being shared with other computers at your home or
office.
- Downloading several files at the same time with P2P programs, eating up
part of the available bandwidth of your Internet connection etc.

The question is: This tweak can only be performed in Win XP Pro right?
What about Win XP Home Edition? If there a tweak or work around for it as
well?

Your help is greatly appreciated!
 
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V

V Green

Wow. Where did you get this fiction?

I have never done anything with the default settings
for QoS or anything, and get my full, advertised DL
speed from my ISP (as evidenced by d/l a big file
and check KB/sec). And that's through a router.

If you feel your Internet connection is slow, as opposed
to your NETWORK connection (which is probably what
the settings you're discussing affect) you need to check elsewhere.

Go here:

http://test.lvcm.com/

and see what you're getting (Java VM needed) before you go
start fiddling around with things.
 
G

Guest

Fiction or Nonfiction that's what I want to find out.
Has there ever been any research done on this from Microsoft?
This myth you say is all over the net.
Here's a site for example: http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/419

And indeed, before I go medling with things beyond my expertise, I'd like to
know if Microsoft has ever conducted this test using all resources.


--
Sincerely,
Wen


V Green said:
Wow. Where did you get this fiction?

I have never done anything with the default settings
for QoS or anything, and get my full, advertised DL
speed from my ISP (as evidenced by d/l a big file
and check KB/sec). And that's through a router.

If you feel your Internet connection is slow, as opposed
to your NETWORK connection (which is probably what
the settings you're discussing affect) you need to check elsewhere.

Go here:

http://test.lvcm.com/

and see what you're getting (Java VM needed) before you go
start fiddling around with things.
 
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