disk mgmt query


L

Luvsmel

I have a desktop system with two different sized HDs with both having the
identical xp media edition installed.
The problem is that windows is not allowing me to manage the pecking order.
Drive "0" is being read in disk mgmt as drive D and Drive "1" is being read
as drive C.
In the bios upon boot up, Drive 0 is in fact being read as the primary
master and Drive 1 read as the primary slave.
I have tried to change the letters of these drives to drive 0 = C and drive
1 = D but a window pops up saying that I can't change the name of the boot
drive.
"Windows cannot modify the letter of your boot volume or system volume"
I've tried diskpart - select drive- select volume/partition to deactivate
each drive
but it hasn't helped.
I keep getting the same message.
How is it that windows has determined both drives are the boot drive
instead of just one??..and is there any way to force the letters to change?
TIA



__________ Information from ESET Smart Security, version of virus signature database 4913 (20100303) __________

The message was checked by ESET Smart Security.

http://www.eset.com
 
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V

VanguardLH

Luvsmel said:
I have a desktop system with two different sized HDs with both having the
identical xp media edition installed.
The problem is that windows is not allowing me to manage the pecking order.
Drive "0" is being read in disk mgmt as drive D and Drive "1" is being read
as drive C.
In the bios upon boot up, Drive 0 is in fact being read as the primary
master and Drive 1 read as the primary slave.
I have tried to change the letters of these drives to drive 0 = C and drive
1 = D but a window pops up saying that I can't change the name of the boot
drive.
"Windows cannot modify the letter of your boot volume or system volume"
I've tried diskpart - select drive- select volume/partition to deactivate
each drive
but it hasn't helped.
I keep getting the same message.
How is it that windows has determined both drives are the boot drive
instead of just one??..and is there any way to force the letters to change?
TIA

NT based versions of Windows don't care about the physical detection order
of mass storage devices as determined by the BIOS. It uses the signature
that it wrote in the MBR to identify a partition to a drive letter. To see
the structure of the MBR, see:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Master_boot_record

That way, no matter how you reconfigure the drive for its physical detection
order, Windows still knows that drive with that signature is assigned the
same drive designator. This eliminated the problem of relying on the BIOS
using its physical detection order to assign drive letters since moving,
removing, or repartitioning the disks would result in drive letter changes.
Anything that alters the disk signature could corrupt the drive designators
since Windows no longer has a correct lookup (for example,
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/293778). If that happens, you can use
Rescan Disks in the Disk Management applet to store new disk signatures so
that drive designators remain the same no matter where the disk gets moved.
I suspect you could still run into problems if you start adding or deleting
partitions on that disk. The disk signature identifies the disk even after
it is moved. It doesn't identify a partition on that disk.

If you want to change the drive letter of a partition, you can't change it
to a drive letter that is already in use. If you want D: to become C: and
C: to become D: and assuming G: isn't used, change C: to G:, D: to C:, and
G: to D:.

C: -> G:
D: -> C: (because C: became available from the 1st change)
G: -> D: (because D: became available from the 2nd change)

You sure that you even want the OS partition to be identified as drive D:?
Many applications remain hardcoded to use some space on drive C: (even
Office applications do that). Since you can't have more than one instance
of Windows running at a time on your host, why wouldn't you want its
partition to be identified as C:? No matter what partition you use to boot
Windows, you can have it identified as the C: drive. That may not be true
with Microsoft's stupid dual-boot scheme but no one outside of Microsoft
uses that kludge (where you boot one OS to then load a different OS).

Get a real multi-boot manager. Put each OS in its own primary partition
(you can have up to 4 partitions on a hard disk where 1 to 4 of them are
primary partitions). The primary partitions not used for booting will be
hidden (unless you undo the hiding by going into Disk Management to assign a
drive letter to them). The *active* primary partition (which is what the
multi-boot manager changes based on your selection) will be the C: drive.
There will be no conflict with the OS'es in the other primary partitions
because they aren't assigned a drive letter under the instance of the OS
that you do boot. GAG (available at Sourceforge) is a good free multi-boot
manager. You can even set it up to run from a floppy until you decide the
setup is correct and then copy it to the 446-byte bootstrap area in the MBR.

Normally in a multi-boot setup, C: is the Windows (system) partition. The
other primary partitions for the other instances of Windows remain hidden by
not assigning them a drive letter. Drive designators are defined within the
instance of Windows that is running. So when you choose a different
partition to be the active one and use its boot sector to load its instance
of Windows, drive C: defined in that instance of Windows will not conflict
with what is drive C: in the other instances of Windows, and similarly for
any other drive designators you define within an instance of Windows. So,
for example, if you didn't want to hide the other instances of Windows, in
instance #1 you could have its OS partition as C: and another partition as
D: (which has another instance but inactive copy of Windows). Then when you
choose to boot to the other instance of Windows, its partition is defined in
that instance of Windows so it is C: while your first instance but inactive
copy of Windows is D:. That would let you do file management in the
partition holding the inactive instances of Windows. It also means they are
more likely to get infected when your active instance of Windows gets
infected.
__________ Information from ESET Smart Security, version of virus signature database 4913 (20100303) __________

The message was checked by ESET Smart Security.

http://www.eset.com

Please configure your anti-virus solution to stop spamming the newsgroup.
It makes you look stupid. No one is going to believe a post is clean simply
because the poster or their AV program says so. It's just text. It's spam.
 
D

Daave

VanguardLH said:
If you want to change the drive letter of a partition, you can't
change it to a drive letter that is already in use. If you want D:
to become C: and C: to become D: and assuming G: isn't used, change
C: to G:, D: to C:, and G: to D:.

I'll bet you're a musician. :)
 
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R

Ronaldo

Luvsmel said:
I have a desktop system with two different sized HDs with both having the
identical xp media edition installed.
The problem is that windows is not allowing me to manage the pecking
order.
Drive "0" is being read in disk mgmt as drive D and Drive "1" is being
read
as drive C.
In the bios upon boot up, Drive 0 is in fact being read as the primary
master and Drive 1 read as the primary slave.
I have tried to change the letters of these drives to drive 0 = C and
drive
1 = D but a window pops up saying that I can't change the name of the boot
drive.
"Windows cannot modify the letter of your boot volume or system volume"
I've tried diskpart - select drive- select volume/partition to deactivate
each drive
but it hasn't helped.
I keep getting the same message.

A: To me your problem seems easy to solve, all you need to do is switch HD
positions inside the CPU case, and as you do, reset the HD jumper settings
from MA to SL on the 0 = HD, and from SL to MA on the 1 = HD. You may or
may not have to change the default OS depending on which you are booting or
want to boot on by default... you can do that in Start\Run\"msconfig" (no
quotes) and Enter \ BOOT.INI tab\ select the OS and click on Default.
Before trying any of these changes, check that the Boot.ini file on both
Systems has the identical data to prevent booting problems after switching
HD positions. If there is a difference from one boot.ini file to the other,
or only one OS has a boot.ini file, copy that file to the other or edit it
accordingly if there is a diference... for instance, the latest installed OS
(D) could have the boot.ini file and the OS on C could not have it, and
you'd need identical boot.ini files to boot from any of the HD if you should
separate them and leave any of them on the computer.



How is it that windows has determined both drives are the boot drive
instead of just one??..and is there any way to force the letters to
change? TIA
Both drives are boot drives, but one is the default drive, see if changing
the default drive in msconfig makes a difference.

If you don't want to open the CPU case, as my instructions above,.. try only
the Default setting.. it will change the letter position in My Computer &
Explorer but not make changes in the Disk Manager.

About your intentions to change the System drive letters, you can change
them with the right instructions and application, but it's quite risky and I
would not advice it because you have a much easyer solution which is to
switch the Hard Drive positions inside the CPU case, not forgetting the
jumper settings...

...............
 

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