Create a bootable ISO image file from a bootable CD/DVD?


J

John Doe

Practically every search result changes the expression to "How to
make a bootable CD". What I would like to do is make an ISO file
that, like the CD it comes from, is bootable. I was trying to burn a
non-bootable ISO file to a USB flash drive, but I suspect that
somehow extracting everything from the bootable rescue CD and making
a bootable ISO file would be easier. But so far that's like pulling
teeth, too.

I have followed several different directions for making a non-
bootable ISO file into a bootable ISO file, the instructions are
simple enough, but have failed.

I have the bootable CD right here. So I'd like to find something to
extract the whole bootable thing and to make a bootable ISO file out
of it.

Thanks.
 
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P

Paul

Practically every search result changes the expression to "How to
make a bootable CD". What I would like to do is make an ISO file
that, like the CD it comes from, is bootable. I was trying to burn a
non-bootable ISO file to a USB flash drive, but I suspect that
somehow extracting everything from the bootable rescue CD and making
a bootable ISO file would be easier. But so far that's like pulling
teeth, too.

I have followed several different directions for making a non-
bootable ISO file into a bootable ISO file, the instructions are
simple enough, but have failed.

I have the bootable CD right here. So I'd like to find something to
extract the whole bootable thing and to make a bootable ISO file out
of it.

Thanks.

If I knew how CDs worked, I'd be a millionaire :)

I don't remember seeing any boot details in ISO9660 itself. That
forced me to go through the extensions list one by one.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:ISO_9660_extensions

El-Torito has some provision for booting.

http://download.intel.com/support/motherboards/desktop/sb/specscdrom.pdf

But, that doesn't explain to me, when I open an ISO9660 file with 7ZIP,
what exactly the [Boot] folder does. And whether it has anything to do with
the previous structure or not.

I can find references to tools like this, but I have no idea whether
they line up with what you want to do or not.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms912932(v=WinEmbedded.5).aspx

Usually, it's the CD which is bootable, and the user wants to convert the
contents of the CD, so they will boot from a USB drive. Or, if small enough,
from say, a floppy diskette. There's quite a few of those tools. Some,
have a menu where you select the actual OS type of the origin CD (or ISO9660),
implying there are specific things that need to be fixed.

http://www.howtogeek.com/127377/the...eating-a-bootable-windows-or-linux-usb-drive/

If you use imgburn, to say, convert a WinXP installer CD into an ISO9660
file, then immediately turn around and burn a blank from the ISO9660 file
just made, the new disc will be bootable. The .iso file seems to capture
what makes it boot. But just working with the file system portion (i.e.
use a tool which only extracts the files), might not be enough to get everything.
And perhaps the El-Torito spec will help explain that.

Paul
 
J

John Doe

Paul said:
John Doe wrote:
If I knew how CDs worked, I'd be a millionaire :)

I don't remember seeing any boot details in ISO9660 itself. That
forced me to go through the extensions list one by one.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:ISO_9660_extensions

El-Torito has some provision for booting.

http://download.intel.com/support/motherboards/desktop/sb/specscd
rom.pdf

But, that doesn't explain to me, when I open an ISO9660 file
with 7ZIP, what exactly the [Boot] folder does. And whether it
has anything to do with the previous structure or not.

I can find references to tools like this, but I have no idea
whether they line up with what you want to do or not.

Specifically, I'm trying to put the Macrium Reflect boot disk on a
USB drive. Unless I fall asleep first, maybe I'll search for that
specific criteria before hitting the hay.
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms912932(v=WinEmbedded.
5%29.aspx

Usually, it's the CD which is bootable, and the user wants to
convert the contents of the CD, so they will boot from a USB
drive.

The CD is bootable. But I want the USB to be bootable. Even
Microsoft can make a utility that puts a bootable ISO image on a
USB. But the ISO image that Macrium produces is not bootable
(unless it's going to the CD).

Seems to me there would be a tool that copies the data/bits from a
bootable CD to make a bootable USB drive. I'm sure it would
require some formatting changes, but it would use the same
operating system and data.

Again, I've seen some stuff about making a non-bootable ISO
bootable, but it ain't working yet.

--
 
J

John Doe

The tutorial worked, even though the boot USB requires user input
before proceeding to the restore screens.

Apparently using a Flash Voyager (USB drive) might have been why
previous attempts failed. This time after it failed, a Patriot
Xporter was used and it worked. But using Yumi will be better since
it's freeware, it will be stowed in my system software folder.
 
B

BillW50

In John Doe typed:
The tutorial worked, even though the boot USB requires user input
before proceeding to the restore screens.

Apparently using a Flash Voyager (USB drive) might have been why
previous attempts failed. This time after it failed, a Patriot
Xporter was used and it worked. But using Yumi will be better since
it's freeware, it will be stowed in my system software folder.

I'm still confused here in this thread John. You want to transfer a
bootable CD to a bootable USB flash drive? If so, what is the OS that is
bootable on the CD? Because the method is different depending on the OS.
For example, I have created bootable USB flash drives for the following
OS.

Puppy Linux
Ubuntu Linux
MS-DOS v7
BartPE (like a WinPE clone)
WinPE
 
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D

dadiOH

Specifically, I'm trying to put the Macrium Reflect boot
disk on a USB drive. Unless I fall asleep first, maybe
I'll search for that specific criteria before hitting the
hay.

It is built into Macrium.

1. Start Macrium

2. Click "Other Tasks"

3. Select "Create Rescue Disk"

4. Follow the instructions and point it to where you want it to go.

--

dadiOH
____________________________

Winters getting colder? Tired of the rat race?
Taxes out of hand? Maybe just ready for a change?
Check it out... http://www.floridaloghouse.net
 
D

Desk Rabbit

Paul said:
John Doe wrote:
If I knew how CDs worked, I'd be a millionaire :)

I don't remember seeing any boot details in ISO9660 itself. That
forced me to go through the extensions list one by one.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:ISO_9660_extensions

El-Torito has some provision for booting.

http://download.intel.com/support/motherboards/desktop/sb/specscd
rom.pdf

But, that doesn't explain to me, when I open an ISO9660 file
with 7ZIP, what exactly the [Boot] folder does. And whether it
has anything to do with the previous structure or not.

I can find references to tools like this, but I have no idea
whether they line up with what you want to do or not.

Specifically, I'm trying to put the Macrium Reflect boot disk on a
USB drive. Unless I fall asleep first, maybe I'll search for that
specific criteria before hitting the hay.

The method appears to be craftily hidden away in plain sight on the
Macrium web site

http://kb.macrium.com/KnowledgebaseArticle50025.aspx
 
J

John Doe

The method is not "in plain sight".

I wasn't trying to create a bootable Windows PE USB stick. I was
trying to clone the other one, a Linux rescue CD. And as I've already
said, I found the solution. I was searching too broadly. I was also
using an incompatible USB flash drive.


Desk Rabbit said:
Paul said:
John Doe wrote:
Practically every search result changes the expression to "How
to make a bootable CD". What I would like to do is make an ISO
file that, like the CD it comes from, is bootable. I was trying
to burn a non-bootable ISO file to a USB flash drive, but I
suspect that somehow extracting everything from the bootable
rescue CD and making a bootable ISO file would be easier. But
so far that's like pulling teeth, too.

I have followed several different directions for making a non-
bootable ISO file into a bootable ISO file, the instructions
are simple enough, but have failed.

I have the bootable CD right here. So I'd like to find
something to extract the whole bootable thing and to make a
bootable ISO file out of it.
If I knew how CDs worked, I'd be a millionaire :)

I don't remember seeing any boot details in ISO9660 itself. That
forced me to go through the extensions list one by one.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:ISO_9660_extensions

El-Torito has some provision for booting.

http://download.intel.com/support/motherboards/desktop/sb/specscd
rom.pdf

But, that doesn't explain to me, when I open an ISO9660 file
with 7ZIP, what exactly the [Boot] folder does. And whether it
has anything to do with the previous structure or not.

I can find references to tools like this, but I have no idea
whether they line up with what you want to do or not.

Specifically, I'm trying to put the Macrium Reflect boot disk on a
USB drive. Unless I fall asleep first, maybe I'll search for that
specific criteria before hitting the hay.

The method appears to be craftily hidden away in plain sight on the
Macrium web site

http://kb.macrium.com/KnowledgebaseArticle50025.aspx
 
J

John Doe

Looks like the closest thing I've found for cloning the Macrium
Reflect boot CD to a USB drive is (unetbootin-windows-585). But it
too includes a boot loader. Without knowing how to change the boot
loader settings before they are "burned" to the USB, yet, would be
better if the thing doesn't need user input before it gets to Macrium
Reflect's restore dialogue, just like the CD does.
 
J

John Doe

Correction. The "unetbootin" boot loader defaults correctly so
there's no need for user intervention after rebooting and before the
restore dialogue.
 
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D

David

At Fri, 03 Jan 2014 02:48:47 -0500, Paul rearranged some electrons to
write:
Practically every search result changes the expression to "How to make
a bootable CD". What I would like to do is make an ISO file that, like
the CD it comes from, is bootable. I was trying to burn a non-bootable
ISO file to a USB flash drive, but I suspect that somehow extracting
everything from the bootable rescue CD and making a bootable ISO file
would be easier. But so far that's like pulling teeth, too.

I have followed several different directions for making a non- bootable
ISO file into a bootable ISO file, the instructions are simple enough,
but have failed.

I have the bootable CD right here. So I'd like to find something to
extract the whole bootable thing and to make a bootable ISO file out of
it.

Thanks.
If I knew how CDs worked, I'd be a millionaire :)

I don't remember seeing any boot details in ISO9660 itself. That forced
me to go through the extensions list one by one.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:ISO_9660_extensions

El-Torito has some provision for booting.

http://download.intel.com/support/motherboards/desktop/sb/specscdrom.pdf

But, that doesn't explain to me, when I open an ISO9660 file with 7ZIP,
what exactly the [Boot] folder does. And whether it has anything to do
with the previous structure or not.

I can find references to tools like this, but I have no idea whether
they line up with what you want to do or not.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms912932(v=WinEmbedded.5% 29.aspx

Usually, it's the CD which is bootable, and the user wants to convert
the contents of the CD, so they will boot from a USB drive. Or, if small
enough,
from say, a floppy diskette. There's quite a few of those tools. Some,
have a menu where you select the actual OS type of the origin CD (or
ISO9660),
implying there are specific things that need to be fixed.

http://www.howtogeek.com/127377/the-best-free-tools-for-creating-a- bootable-windows-or-linux-usb-drive/

If you use imgburn, to say, convert a WinXP installer CD into an ISO9660
file, then immediately turn around and burn a blank from the ISO9660
file just made, the new disc will be bootable. The .iso file seems to
capture what makes it boot. But just working with the file system
portion (i.e.
use a tool which only extracts the files), might not be enough to get
everything.
And perhaps the El-Torito spec will help explain that.

Paul


http://rufus.akeo.ie/
 
G

Gene E. Bloch

At Fri, 03 Jan 2014 02:48:47 -0500, Paul rearranged some electrons to
write:
Practically every search result changes the expression to "How to
make a bootable CD". What I would like to do is make an ISO file
that, like the CD it comes from, is bootable. I was trying to burn
a non-bootable ISO file to a USB flash drive, but I suspect that
somehow extracting everything from the bootable rescue CD and
making a bootable ISO file would be easier. But so far that's like
pulling teeth, too.

I have followed several different directions for making a non-
bootable ISO file into a bootable ISO file, the instructions are
simple enough, but have failed.

I have the bootable CD right here. So I'd like to find something to
extract the whole bootable thing and to make a bootable ISO file
out of it.

Thanks.
If I knew how CDs worked, I'd be a millionaire :)

I don't remember seeing any boot details in ISO9660 itself. That
forced me to go through the extensions list one by one.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:ISO_9660_extensions

El-Torito has some provision for booting.

http://download.intel.com/support/motherboards/desktop/sb/specscdrom.pdf

But, that doesn't explain to me, when I open an ISO9660 file with
7ZIP, what exactly the [Boot] folder does. And whether it has
anything to do with the previous structure or not.

I can find references to tools like this, but I have no idea whether
they line up with what you want to do or not.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms912932(v=WinEmbedded.5%
29.aspx

Usually, it's the CD which is bootable, and the user wants to
convert the contents of the CD, so they will boot from a USB drive.
Or, if small enough,
from say, a floppy diskette. There's quite a few of those tools.
Some, have a menu where you select the actual OS type of the origin
CD (or ISO9660),
implying there are specific things that need to be fixed.

http://www.howtogeek.com/127377/the-best-free-tools-for-creating-a-
bootable-windows-or-linux-usb-drive/

If you use imgburn, to say, convert a WinXP installer CD into an
ISO9660 file, then immediately turn around and burn a blank from the
ISO9660 file just made, the new disc will be bootable. The .iso file
seems to capture what makes it boot. But just working with the file
system portion (i.e.
use a tool which only extracts the files), might not be enough to
get everything.
And perhaps the El-Torito spec will help explain that.

Paul

http://rufus.akeo.ie/

That looks very nice! Thanks.

Makes me want to do it...I am wiping some old hard drives, including
built in on aged laptops, so it's relevant to me ATM.
 
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W

...winston

Gene E. Bloch wrote, On 1/4/2014 2:55 PM:
At Fri, 03 Jan 2014 02:48:47 -0500, Paul rearranged some electrons to
write:
On 1/3/2014 1:27 AM, John Doe wrote:
Practically every search result changes the expression to "How to
make a bootable CD". What I would like to do is make an ISO file
that, like the CD it comes from, is bootable. I was trying to burn a
non-bootable ISO file to a USB flash drive, but I suspect that
somehow extracting everything from the bootable rescue CD and making
a bootable ISO file would be easier. But so far that's like pulling
teeth, too.

I have followed several different directions for making a non-
bootable ISO file into a bootable ISO file, the instructions are
simple enough, but have failed.

I have the bootable CD right here. So I'd like to find something to
extract the whole bootable thing and to make a bootable ISO file out
of it.

Thanks.


If I knew how CDs worked, I'd be a millionaire :)

I don't remember seeing any boot details in ISO9660 itself. That
forced me to go through the extensions list one by one.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:ISO_9660_extensions

El-Torito has some provision for booting.

http://download.intel.com/support/motherboards/desktop/sb/specscdrom.pdf

But, that doesn't explain to me, when I open an ISO9660 file with
7ZIP, what exactly the [Boot] folder does. And whether it has
anything to do with the previous structure or not.

I can find references to tools like this, but I have no idea whether
they line up with what you want to do or not.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms912932(v=WinEmbedded.5%
29.aspx

Usually, it's the CD which is bootable, and the user wants to convert
the contents of the CD, so they will boot from a USB drive. Or, if
small enough,
from say, a floppy diskette. There's quite a few of those tools.
Some, have a menu where you select the actual OS type of the origin
CD (or ISO9660),
implying there are specific things that need to be fixed.

http://www.howtogeek.com/127377/the-best-free-tools-for-creating-a-
bootable-windows-or-linux-usb-drive/

If you use imgburn, to say, convert a WinXP installer CD into an
ISO9660 file, then immediately turn around and burn a blank from the
ISO9660 file just made, the new disc will be bootable. The .iso file
seems to capture what makes it boot. But just working with the file
system portion (i.e.
use a tool which only extracts the files), might not be enough to get
everything.
And perhaps the El-Torito spec will help explain that.

Paul

http://rufus.akeo.ie/

That looks very nice! Thanks.

Makes me want to do it...I am wiping some old hard drives, including
built in on aged laptops, so it's relevant to me ATM.
Agreed, looks promising and a plus since it supports UEFI/GPT for Windows.
 

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