chkdsk/f


G

Guest

I store my important data on an external USB Hardrive. When I started the
drive up, I got an error message which advised me that one of my folders was
corrupted, not just a file, but the entire folder. The message advised me to
run chkdsk to recover the files, which I did. Then the message to dismount
the volume appeared and I answered Y to it. With the volume dismounted
message came the message that all open handles to this volume are now
invalid. CHKDSK then proceeded to fix the disk, deleting corrupted files and
then recovering orphaned files. At the end of the run,chkdsk reset the
security id's for some of the files and verified that operation. Then it
inserted data attributes to those files and corrected errors in the master
file table. In other words chkdsk did a fine job, I even have a print out of
what it did. After all was said and done and I re-booted my computer, the
previously corrupt folder, which was fixed by chkdsk, was gone. The entire
directory was gone. The only thing that was left was a ghost folder with
nothing in it. I did a search and nothing came up.
The big question is, what did chkdsk fix and what did it do with an entire
folder ?
I am running Win XP Home Edition.
External drive is a Ximeta, NetDisk NDAS.

Thanks for your feed back,

Paul
 
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M

Maincat

Paul said:
I store my important data on an external USB Hardrive. When I started the
drive up, I got an error message which advised me that one of my folders
was
corrupted, not just a file, but the entire folder. The message advised me
to
run chkdsk to recover the files, which I did. Then the message to dismount
the volume appeared and I answered Y to it. With the volume dismounted
message came the message that all open handles to this volume are now
invalid. CHKDSK then proceeded to fix the disk, deleting corrupted files
and
then recovering orphaned files. At the end of the run,chkdsk reset the
security id's for some of the files and verified that operation. Then it
inserted data attributes to those files and corrected errors in the master
file table. In other words chkdsk did a fine job, I even have a print out
of
what it did. After all was said and done and I re-booted my computer, the
previously corrupt folder, which was fixed by chkdsk, was gone. The entire
directory was gone. The only thing that was left was a ghost folder with
nothing in it. I did a search and nothing came up.
The big question is, what did chkdsk fix and what did it do with an entire
folder ?
I am running Win XP Home Edition.
External drive is a Ximeta, NetDisk NDAS.

Thanks for your feed back,

Paul
Don't know what chkdsk did, but what's the problem. Just restore your
important data from your backup.
 
D

Doug

Paul said:
I store my important data on an external USB Hardrive. When I
started the
drive up, I got an error message which advised me that one of
my folders was
corrupted, not just a file, but the entire folder. The message
advised me to
run chkdsk to recover the files, which I did. Then the message
to dismount
the volume appeared and I answered Y to it. With the volume
dismounted
message came the message that all open handles to this volume
are now
invalid. CHKDSK then proceeded to fix the disk, deleting
corrupted files and
then recovering orphaned files. At the end of the run,chkdsk
reset the
security id's for some of the files and verified that
operation. Then it
inserted data attributes to those files and corrected errors
in the master
file table. In other words chkdsk did a fine job, I even have
a print out of
what it did. After all was said and done and I re-booted my
computer, the
previously corrupt folder, which was fixed by chkdsk, was
gone. The entire
directory was gone. The only thing that was left was a ghost
folder with
nothing in it. I did a search and nothing came up.
The big question is, what did chkdsk fix and what did it do
with an entire
folder ?
I am running Win XP Home Edition.
External drive is a Ximeta, NetDisk NDAS.

Thanks for your feed back,

Paul
-
You wanted the corrupt file fixed...that is what it fixed. Carry
on now and re-enter what you lost.
-
 
A

Alan

So are you suggesting that people should make backups of their backups? And
then, make a copy of the copy of the backup?

How many iterations of a backup in necessary for someone to be truly "backed
up?'

Alan
 
F

Frank Saunders, MS-MVP OE/WM

If that disk was just backups, make new ones.

Alan said:
So are you suggesting that people should make backups of their backups?
And then, make a copy of the copy of the backup?

How many iterations of a backup in necessary for someone to be truly
"backed up?'

Alan
 
M

Maincat

Where did he say that the files were backups? He didn't. How do you know
they are backups? You don't.
 
B

Bob I

Paul said:
I store my important data on an external USB Hardrive.

Sounds like a "no backup" situation to me.
 
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G

Guest

Thanks Doug....
I would love to re-nter what I had lost, but I don't know where it is.
Did chkdsk create some sort of new file? I ran a search for the files I lost
using their file extension syntax, but the files did not show up. Fortunately
I have a scan log listing all the files, the list is 40 pages long and lists
files like Word Documents which I now can't find. Re-entering right now
means, re-typing hundreds of documents of which I have hard copies, in order
to create another database. I am sure they are somewhere, but where. Oh, and
they are not back up files, they are original files stored on an external
harddrive. Virus scan does not show up anything and neither does spyware
scan.

Paul
 
R

Rock

Paul said:
I store my important data on an external USB Hardrive. When I started the
drive up, I got an error message which advised me that one of my folders
was
corrupted, not just a file, but the entire folder. The message advised me
to
run chkdsk to recover the files, which I did. Then the message to dismount
the volume appeared and I answered Y to it. With the volume dismounted
message came the message that all open handles to this volume are now
invalid. CHKDSK then proceeded to fix the disk, deleting corrupted files
and
then recovering orphaned files. At the end of the run,chkdsk reset the
security id's for some of the files and verified that operation. Then it
inserted data attributes to those files and corrected errors in the master
file table. In other words chkdsk did a fine job, I even have a print out
of
what it did. After all was said and done and I re-booted my computer, the
previously corrupt folder, which was fixed by chkdsk, was gone. The entire
directory was gone. The only thing that was left was a ghost folder with
nothing in it. I did a search and nothing came up.
The big question is, what did chkdsk fix and what did it do with an entire
folder ?
I am running Win XP Home Edition.
External drive is a Ximeta, NetDisk NDAS.

You have experienced one of the problems with chkdsk. In certain
circumstances it can result in data corruption or data loss that is not
recoverable. It also doesn't give any indication of what it did except for
the brief log you can view from event viewer in the application log. Look
for entries of a type winlogon. It won't help you much, though.

Never run chkdsk unless there is a full backup of the data. As a general
rule one should have a backup of all important data at all times.
 
A

Alan

Frank, Maincat and Bob I: All of you are correct about the OP using the
external hard drive for his main data storage media. I shouldn't have
assumed that the external hard drive was his backup.

Alan
 
P

Poprivet

Paul said:
Thanks Doug....
I would love to re-nter what I had lost, but I don't know where it is.
Did chkdsk create some sort of new file? I ran a search for the files
I lost using their file extension syntax, but the files did not show
up. Fortunately I have a scan log listing all the files, the list is
40 pages long and lists files like Word Documents which I now can't
find. Re-entering right now means, re-typing hundreds of documents of
which I have hard copies, in order to create another database. I am
sure they are somewhere, but where. Oh, and they are not back up
files, they are original files stored on an external harddrive. Virus
scan does not show up anything and neither does spyware scan.

Paul
Make it a priority to learn to backup properly. It sounds like you said you
have the original data on a disk, so ... you do have a restarting point at
least. All is not completely lost. But just think how much easier this
would be had you created backups of your data.
 
D

Doug

Sorry Paul...I misinterpreted your predicament. I keep my
original documents and spreadsheet files on my harddrive and
BACKUP on USB drives. Be careful with the USB drives...they are
reasonably reliable BUT things can go wrong. Also some utility
pgms designed for the hardrive may or may not do what they are
supposed to do on removable drives.

On really important stuff it doesn't hurt to have more than one
back-up.

I use Karen Kenworthy's "Replicator" for back-ups and it works
like a charm...have never had a screw-up yet (fingers crossed),
and it is FAST.

Doug W.
-
 
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F

Frank Saunders, MS-MVP OE/WM

Alan said:
Frank, Maincat and Bob I: All of you are correct about the OP using the
external hard drive for his main data storage media. I shouldn't have
assumed that the external hard drive was his backup.

Have you tried signing on as Administrator in Safe Mode?
What anti-virus are you using?
 

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