CHKDSK /F


R

RScotti

Hi,
Can someone please help me on this? I am totally confused.
If possible I would like some document from some source to give to HP.


I have been having problems running Chkdsk /f so I talked to HP and they said "When you run it with the /f it only does
three options."
CHKDSK is verifying files (stage 1 of 3)...
CHKDSK is verifying indexes (stage 2 of 3)...
CHKDSK is verifying security descriptors (stage 3 of 3)...
This is what it does in READ ONLY MODE(Chkdsk no/x)

I could swear Chkdsk /F did four options.(fix files)
Chkdsk /R does five options (free space) but don't see it fix files when it is on #4
They also said always use the /R and not the /F. MS says use the /F except for free space errors.
If Chkdsk /F only does the three options How does it fix the files?

I saw these but it doesn't say if CHKDSK /R fixes file errors.
http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/windows/xp/all/proddocs/en-us/chkdsk.mspx?mfr=true

http://forums.cnet.com/5208-6121_102-0.html?forumID=45&threadID=186480&messageID=2028475

Have a good day,
RScotti

remove "nospam" in order to email me.
 
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D

Dave Patrick

After backup you can run;
chkdsk /r
from the recovery console command line. (/r implies /f and /p)

To start the Recovery Console, start the computer from the Windows XP
CD-Rom. At the "Welcome to Setup" screen. Press F10 or R to repair a Windows
XP installation, and then press C to use the Recovery Console. The Recovery
Console then prompts you for the administrator password. If you do not have
the correct password, Recovery Console does not allow access to the
computer. If an incorrect password is entered three times, the Recovery
Console quits and restarts the computer. Note If the registry is corrupted
or missing or no valid installations are found, the Recovery Console starts
in the root of the startup volume without requiring a password. You cannot
access any folders, but you can carry out commands such as chkdsk, fixboot,
and fixmbr for limited disk repairs. Once the password has been validated,
you have full access to the Recovery Console, but limited access to the hard
disk. You can only access the following folders on your computer: drive
root, %systemroot% or %windir%

--

Regards,

Dave Patrick ....Please no email replies - reply in newsgroup.
Microsoft Certified Professional
Microsoft MVP [Windows]
http://www.microsoft.com/protect
 
C

Curt Christianson

From:
http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/windows/xp/all/proddocs/en-us/chkdsk.mspx?mfr=true



/f : Fixes errors on the disk. The disk must be locked. If chkdsk cannot
lock the drive, a message appears that asks you if you want to check the
drive the next time you restart the computer.

"Chkdsk corrects disk errors only if you specify the /f command-line option"
and
/r : Locates bad sectors and recovers readable information. The disk must be
locked
Finding physical disk errors

Use the /r command-line option to find physical disk errors in the file
system.

Nowhere can I find anything about /r fixing files, only /f.
--
Curt
http://dundats.mvps.org/
http://www.aumha.org/


| Hi,
| Can someone please help me on this? I am totally confused.
| If possible I would like some document from some source to give to HP.
|
|
| I have been having problems running Chkdsk /f so I talked to HP and they
said "When you run it with the /f it only does
| three options."
| >CHKDSK is verifying files (stage 1 of 3)...
| >CHKDSK is verifying indexes (stage 2 of 3)...
| >CHKDSK is verifying security descriptors (stage 3 of 3)...
| This is what it does in READ ONLY MODE(Chkdsk no/x)
|
| I could swear Chkdsk /F did four options.(fix files)
| Chkdsk /R does five options (free space) but don't see it fix files when
it is on #4
| They also said always use the /R and not the /F. MS says use the /F except
for free space errors.
| If Chkdsk /F only does the three options How does it fix the files?
|
| I saw these but it doesn't say if CHKDSK /R fixes file errors.
|
http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/windows/xp/all/proddocs/en-us/chkdsk.mspx?mfr=true
|
|
http://forums.cnet.com/5208-6121_102-0.html?forumID=45&threadID=186480&messageID=2028475
|
| Have a good day,
| RScotti
|
| remove "nospam" in order to email me.
|
 
R

Ronnie Vernon MVP

Just open a command prompt and type chkdsk /? to get a complete description of what each switch does.
 
R

RScotti

That's what I saw also.
If you have the time can you run Chkdsk /f and let me know if you get the three or four options.
So far I only see the three.
From:
http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/windows/xp/all/proddocs/en-us/chkdsk.mspx?mfr=true



/f : Fixes errors on the disk. The disk must be locked. If chkdsk cannot
lock the drive, a message appears that asks you if you want to check the
drive the next time you restart the computer.

"Chkdsk corrects disk errors only if you specify the /f command-line option"
and
/r : Locates bad sectors and recovers readable information. The disk must be
locked
Finding physical disk errors

Use the /r command-line option to find physical disk errors in the file
system.

Nowhere can I find anything about /r fixing files, only /f.
Have a good day,
RScotti

remove "nospam" in order to email me.
 
R

Rock

From:
http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/windows/xp/all/proddocs/en-us/chkdsk.mspx?mfr=true



/f : Fixes errors on the disk. The disk must be locked. If chkdsk cannot
lock the drive, a message appears that asks you if you want to check the
drive the next time you restart the computer.

"Chkdsk corrects disk errors only if you specify the /f command-line
option"
and
/r : Locates bad sectors and recovers readable information. The disk must
be
locked
Finding physical disk errors

Use the /r command-line option to find physical disk errors in the file
system.

Nowhere can I find anything about /r fixing files, only /f.
/r implies (includes) /F. Running /r does /f first.

<snip>
 
R

RScotti

I can't access the MS Recovery Console. I have an OEM with recovery disks.
I do have a link to it but it's broken.
After backup you can run;
chkdsk /r
from the recovery console command line. (/r implies /f and /p)

To start the Recovery Console, start the computer from the Windows XP
CD-Rom. At the "Welcome to Setup" screen. Press F10 or R to repair a Windows
XP installation, and then press C to use the Recovery Console. The Recovery
Console then prompts you for the administrator password. If you do not have
the correct password, Recovery Console does not allow access to the
computer. If an incorrect password is entered three times, the Recovery
Console quits and restarts the computer. Note If the registry is corrupted
or missing or no valid installations are found, the Recovery Console starts
in the root of the startup volume without requiring a password. You cannot
access any folders, but you can carry out commands such as chkdsk, fixboot,
and fixmbr for limited disk repairs. Once the password has been validated,
you have full access to the Recovery Console, but limited access to the hard
disk. You can only access the following folders on your computer: drive
root, %systemroot% or %windir%
Have a good day,
RScotti

remove "nospam" in order to email me.
 
R

RScotti

Thanks again Rock,
I saw the fix option in the /R but wasn't sure if it was just read only.

/r implies (includes) /F. Running /r does /f first.

<snip>
Have a good day,
RScotti

remove "nospam" in order to email me.
 
R

RScotti

Thanks. I should have though of that.
I am not thinking very good today.
Just open a command prompt and type chkdsk /? to get a complete description of what each switch does.
Have a good day,
RScotti

remove "nospam" in order to email me.
 
R

RScotti

Hi Rock,
If you use just the /f do you get three or four options?I only get three.
This would be better for me so I don't have to wait a hour to get the results.

/r implies (includes) /F. Running /r does /f first.

<snip>
Have a good day,
RScotti

remove "nospam" in order to email me.
 
D

Dave Patrick

No, you can't. Most OEM disks are capable of starting and or installing the
RC

--

Regards,

Dave Patrick ....Please no email replies - reply in newsgroup.
Microsoft Certified Professional
Microsoft MVP [Windows]
http://www.microsoft.com/protect
 
R

RScotti

Hi Dave,
My OEM did install the RC but it doesn't work.
If you use just the /f do you get three or four options?
I only get three. I thought it should do four.
I can try this from my Bootdisk.com CD

No, you can't. Most OEM disks are capable of starting and or installing the
RC
Have a good day,
RScotti

remove "nospam" in order to email me.
 
D

Dave Patrick

"doesn't work" is hard to decipher. Don't use win9x tools on an NT system.

--

Regards,

Dave Patrick ....Please no email replies - reply in newsgroup.
Microsoft Certified Professional
Microsoft MVP [Windows]
http://www.microsoft.com/protect
 
R

RScotti

If I select the RC I get a blue screen that says something like I installed new hardware and there is something wrong. I
have power down to get out and never get into the RC anymore.
I may be able to get it back with a reinstall but that takes 3 1/2 hours with the OEM Recovery disks.
I just did it today and the RC was still not there.

Can you please answer this?
If I use the Chkdsk /f Do I get three or four operations.
I thought it should be four but HP says I only get three File,security,index NO File repair visible like you get with
Chkdsk /R
"doesn't work" is hard to decipher. Don't use win9x tools on an NT system.
Have a good day,
RScotti

remove "nospam" in order to email me.
 
R

Rock

Thanks again Rock,
I saw the fix option in the /R but wasn't sure if it was just read only.



Have a good day,
RScotti

remove "nospam" in order to email me.

If you run it from within windows by right clicking on the drive |
properties | error checking there are two options you can select. One is to
automatically fix file system errors. This is the same as the /f switch.
To do this the volume has to be unmounted which for the system and/or boot
volumes means it has to be done after the next restart. The second option
is scan for and attempt recovery of bad sectors. This is the /r switch.

I never run chkdsk from within windows from this dialog box so I am going by
memory but I believe checking for bad sectors will run with the volume
mounted. In that case it will scan for errors but will not fix them
(assuming the other options is not selected, but then will scan the drive
for sector errors. So there is a way to run /r without fixing errors first.
If my memory is wrong here I'm sure someone will jump in with the right
info.

Running chkdsk from within windows on volumes that would otherwise need to
be unmounted to fix the errors gives unreliable results so don't bother with
it.
 
W

Wesley Vogel

Read-only mode is chkdsk with NO switches.

[[Chkdsk might not accurately report information in read-only mode.]]
From...
Chkdsk
http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/Windows/XP/all/reskit/en-us/Default.asp?url=/resources/documentation/windows/xp/all/reskit/en-us/prmb_tol_pwfd.asp

[[If you run chkdsk without the /f command-line option on an active
partition, it might report spurious errors because it cannot lock the
drive.]]

[[Using chkdsk with open files
If you specify the /f command-line option, chkdsk sends an error message if
there are open files on the disk. If you do not specify the /f command-line
option and open files exist, chkdsk might report lost allocation units on
the disk. This could happen if open files have not yet been recorded in the
file allocation table. If chkdsk reports the loss of a large number of
allocation units, consider repairing the disk.]]
From...
Chkdsk
http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/windows/xp/all/proddocs/en-us/chkdsk.mspx

[[In read-only mode, CHKDSK quits before it completes all three phases if it
encounters errors in earlier phases, and CHKDSK is prone to falsely
reporting errors. For example, CHKDSK may report disk corruption if NTFS
happens to modify areas of a disk while CHKDSK is examining the disk. For
correct verification, a volume must be static, and the only way to guarantee
a static state is to lock the volume. CHKDSK locks the volume only if you
specify the /F switch (or the /R switch, which implies /F). You may need to
run CHKDSK more than once to get CHKDSK to complete all its passes
in read-only mode. ]]
From...
An Explanation of the New C and I Switches That Are Available to Use with
Chkdsk.exe
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/314835

To take advantage of all the Chkdsk parameters, use the command-line version
of Chkdsk.

See..
Understanding what CHKDSK does
here...
An explanation of the new /C and /I Switches that are available to use with
Chkdsk.exe
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/314835

Don't even bother running CHKDSK in read-only mode. It is a waste of time
and prone to not accurately reporting information. CHKDSK might report
spurious errors because it cannot lock the drive.

1. In My Computer or Windows Explorer, right-click the volume you want to
check, and then click Properties.
2. On the Tools tab, click Check Now.
3. Check both boxes:

o To run Chkdsk by using the /f parameter, select the Automatically fix file
system errors check box, and then click Start.
[[Specifies whether Windows repairs file-system errors found during disk
checking. All files must be closed for this program to run. If the drive is
currently in use, a message asks if you want to reschedule
the disk checking for the next time you restart your computer. Your drive is
not available to run other tasks while the disk is being checked.]]

o To run Chkdsk by using the /r parameter, select the Scan for and attempt
recovery of bad sectors check box, and then click Start.
[[Specifies whether Windows repairs file-system errors found during disk
checking, locates bad sectors, and recovers readable information. All files
must be closed for this program to run. If the drive is currently in use, a
message asks if you want to reschedule the disk checking for the next time
you restart your computer. Your drive is not available to run other tasks
while the disk is being checked. If you select this option, you do not need
to select Automatically fix file system errors. Windows fixes any errors on
the disk.]]

You have to reboot for Error-checking to run.

For a look at the chkdsk log.

Open the Event Viewer...
Start | Run | Type: eventvwr | Click OK |
Look in Application | Listed as Information |
Event ID: 1001
Source: Winlogon
[[Description: This includes file system type; drive letter or GUID, and
volume name or serial number to help determine what volume Chkdsk ran
against. Also included is whether Chkdsk ran because a user scheduled it or
because the dirty bit was set.]]

[[When Autochk runs against a volume at boot time it records its output to a
file called Bootex.log in the root of the volume being checked. The Winlogon
service then moves the contents of each Bootex.log file to the Application
Event log.]]

[[This file states whether Chkdsk encountered any errors and, if so,
whether they were fixed.]]


--
Hope this helps. Let us know.

Wes
MS-MVP Windows Shell/User

In
 
R

RScotti

PS
My only option than is to use the Recovery program from HP which only has the /R & /P, NO /F
The /p isn't even in the Chkdsk /?
"doesn't work" is hard to decipher. Don't use win9x tools on an NT system.
Have a good day,
RScotti

remove "nospam" in order to email me.
 
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