Cannot Ping Beyond Default Gateway & DHCP Server


D

dbir

My neighbor finally took the plunge to upgrade from dial-up to cable, but
cannot access the internet through it. He’s using XP Home, directly
connected to cable modem – service by Time Warner, which works fine for me
next door. His dial-up continues to work fine, but access through his
Ethernet local area connection does not. TW confirmed (with their own
laptop) that the connection & modem are good, so problem must be in his
computer.

Network Diagnostics shows pings to his IP, Default Gateway, and DHCP Server
work, but pings to DNS servers fail. Verified manually (pings to those DNS
from my computer work, so it’s not the DNS themselves). Pings to other IPs
(e.g., Google’s) also fail. Connection’s Status shows lots of packets sent,
but almost none received. Uninstalled Norton 360 with no effect. No other
security software present, Windows Firewall turned off. TCP/IP properties
and IP addresses received (DNS, DHCP) look fine (same external IP addresses
my computer gets).

Other things checked:
Boot in Safe Mode yields same results.
Device Manger shows no problems with Network Adapter or (hidden) TCP/IP
drivers.
Packet Filtering is off.
All Windows components (needed or not) are installed, all services
(needed or not) are started or on auto.
Windows SFC ran OK.

From all the sage advice I found on this board, here’s what I’ve tried
(without success):
reset TCP/IP (netsh int ip reset)
turned off ipsec service (temp)
ipconfig /flushdns
ipconfig /registerdns

So: dial-up works fine, and Ethernet HW/SW gets as far as gateway & DHCP,
but can’t get to DNS nor anything else.

I’m a bit over my head, and sure need some advice. Thanks.
 
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D

dbir

Here 'tis. Thanks for your interest

Windows IP Configuration



Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : morton

Primary Dns Suffix . . . . . . . :

Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Hybrid

IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : No

WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No

DNS Suffix Search List. . . . . . : socal.rr.com



Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection 2:



Connection-specific DNS Suffix . : socal.rr.com

Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Intel(R) PRO/100 VM Network
Connection

Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-08-02-A5-B5-52

Dhcp Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes

Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 76.167.166.133

Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.248.0

IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : fe80::208:2ff:fea5:b552%7

Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 76.167.160.1

DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . : 10.225.64.1

DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 209.18.47.61

209.18.47.62

fec0:0:0:ffff::1%1

fec0:0:0:ffff::2%1

fec0:0:0:ffff::3%1

Lease Obtained. . . . . . . . . . : Monday, August 24, 2009 12:39:08
PM

Lease Expires . . . . . . . . . . : Tuesday, August 25, 2009
12:42:49 AM



Tunnel adapter Teredo Tunneling Pseudo-Interface:



Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :

Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Teredo Tunneling Pseudo-Interface

Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : FF-FF-FF-FF-FF-FF-FF-FF

Dhcp Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No

IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : fe80::ffff:ffff:fffd%4

Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . :

NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Disabled



Tunnel adapter 6to4 Tunneling Pseudo-Interface:



Connection-specific DNS Suffix . : socal.rr.com

Description . . . . . . . . . . . : 6to4 Tunneling Pseudo-Interface

Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 4C-A7-A6-85

Dhcp Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No

IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 2002:4ca7:a685::4ca7:a685

Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . :

DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : fec0:0:0:ffff::1%1

fec0:0:0:ffff::2%1

fec0:0:0:ffff::3%1

NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Disabled



Tunnel adapter Automatic Tunneling Pseudo-Interface:



Connection-specific DNS Suffix . : socal.rr.com

Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Automatic Tunneling
Pseudo-Interface

Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 4C-A7-A6-85

Dhcp Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No

IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : fe80::5efe:76.167.166.133%2

Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . :

DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : fec0:0:0:ffff::1%1

fec0:0:0:ffff::2%1

fec0:0:0:ffff::3%1

NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Disabled
 
D

dbir

Hi Bob

Results from our problem computer. through ethernet connection:

Tracing route to 4.2.2.1 over a maximum of 30 hops
1 9 ms 8 ms * 76.167.160.1
2 * * * Request timed out.
3 * * * Request timed out.
4 * * * Request timed out.
5 * * * Request timed out.
(etc., for total of 30 lines)

For comparisons, I (1) did the same tractrt on my own computer (next door,
same ISP), and (2) did the same tracert on the problem computer while its
ethernet was disabled and its dialup was enabled.

My (healthy) computer, same ISP (serves me as example of what it should look
like, excepting I have a router):

Tracing route to vnsc-pri.sys.gtei.net [4.2.2.1] over a maximum of 30 hops:
1 1 ms <1 ms <1 ms 192.168.1.1
2 10 ms 9 ms 9 ms cpe-75-83-192-1.socal.res.rr.com
[75.83.192.1]
3 11 ms 10 ms 10 ms gig11-46.vntrca1-rtr2.socal.rr.com
[76.167.3.41]
4 18 ms 19 ms 19 ms tge9-3.lamdca1-swt1.socal.rr.com
[76.167.2.52]
5 * * * Request timed out.
6 * * * Request timed out.
7 29 ms 24 ms 25 ms te-1-4.car1.Tustin1.Level3.net [4.79.140.1]
8 25 ms 24 ms 24 ms ae-2-3.bar1.Tustin1.Level3.net [4.69.132.218]
9 26 ms 34 ms 35 ms ae-6-6.ebr1.LosAngeles1.Level3.net
[4.69.136.202]
10 24 ms 25 ms 24 ms ae-21-70.car1.LosAngeles1.Level3.net
[4.69.144.67]
11 25 ms 23 ms 24 ms vnsc-pri.sys.gtei.net [4.2.2.1]
Trace complete.

Problem computer, thru a dial-up connection (serves me to demonstrate that
the problem computer can have successful tracert through a different
connection, even though the starting point is a different ISP):

Tracing route to vnsc-pri.sys.gtei.net [4.2.2.1] over a maximum of 30 hops:
1 185 ms 171 ms 187 ms laxglopop01.o1.com [69.19.219.80]
2 187 ms 171 ms 171 ms o1-69-19-219-19.static.o1.com [69.19.219.19]
3 171 ms 171 ms 171 ms o1-69-19-223-17.static.o1.com [69.19.223.17]
4 171 ms 171 ms 171 ms laxcor1.o1.com [69.19.223.1]
5 187 ms 171 ms 171 ms gi1-24.ccr01.lax04.atlas.cogentco.com
[38.104.76.105]
6 171 ms 187 ms 187 ms te4-3.ccr01.lax01.atlas.cogentco.com
[154.54.24.69]

7 171 ms 187 ms 171 ms te9-1.mpd01.lax01.atlas.cogentco.com
[154.54.2.118]
8 187 ms 202 ms 187 ms te4-1.mpd01.sjc01.atlas.cogentco.com
[154.54.6.30]
9 202 ms 187 ms 202 ms te4-4.mpd01.sjc03.atlas.cogentco.com
[154.54.6.238]
10 187 ms 187 ms 187 ms te-3-3.car3.SanJose1.Level3.net
[4.68.110.137]
11 187 ms 202 ms 203 ms vlan79.csw2.SanJose1.Level3.net [4.68.18.126]
12 203 ms 171 ms 187 ms ge-11-0.core1.SanJose1.Level3.net
[4.68.123.38]
13 187 ms 187 ms 187 ms vnsc-pri.sys.gtei.net [4.2.2.1]
Trace complete.

These results seem consistent with previous symptoms, aren't they? If they
tell us something more, it's over my head (and I'd appreciate education if
there's something here I don't see).

It seems to me that something inside this problem computer is allowing
replies coming in through dial-up to pass through OK, while it is blocking
most (but not all) replies coming in through the NIC. (Replies to messages
addressed to default gateway and DHCP server get through OK, so I'm guessing
the NIC and its driver cannot be the guilty party). What little setting or
table in Windows XP/SP3 Home could cause this symptom?

Thank you for your help.

Don
 
D

dbir

In case anyone is following this, here are today's developments:

Took my neighbor's problem computer to my house and connected it directly to
my Roadrunner modem. His computer accessed the internet OK without problems.

Took my healthy computer to my neighbor's house and connected it directly to
his Roadrunner modem. Got the same problem symptoms (can connect, receive IP
address from DHCP, and receive addresses of DNS servers, but cannot ping nor
access the DNSs nor anything beyond the Default Gateway).

Spent a few hours on phone with Time Warner (Roadrunner) level 1, 2, and 3
support trying lots of things, even swapping out the (new) cable modem
(desperate). Nothing worked.

We are about to give up, with my neighbor resigned to spending the rest of
his life on dial-up.

Any ideas?

Don
 
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L

Lem

dbir said:
In case anyone is following this, here are today's developments:

Took my neighbor's problem computer to my house and connected it directly to
my Roadrunner modem. His computer accessed the internet OK without problems.

Took my healthy computer to my neighbor's house and connected it directly to
his Roadrunner modem. Got the same problem symptoms (can connect, receive IP
address from DHCP, and receive addresses of DNS servers, but cannot ping nor
access the DNSs nor anything beyond the Default Gateway).

Spent a few hours on phone with Time Warner (Roadrunner) level 1, 2, and 3
support trying lots of things, even swapping out the (new) cable modem
(desperate). Nothing worked.

We are about to give up, with my neighbor resigned to spending the rest of
his life on dial-up.

Any ideas?

Don
I don't know if it's the cause of your problems, but it appears as if
your friend's computer has extraneous networking components installed.

The ipconfig results that you posted look like ipv6 is installed. It
shouldn't be for XP Home.

Unless TW requires these added features for some reason, if you go to
the properties of the network adapter, you should only see the following
4 items (see http://screenshots.leeindy.com/lac_general.shtml):

- Client for Microsoft Networks
- QoS Packet Scheduler [this is optional]
- File and Printer Sharing [this also is optional, and in the case of a
computer connected directly to the Internet probably should not be
installed without first installing a firewall]
- Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)

If uninstalling ipv6 from your friend's computer doesn't resolve things,
it might be instructive to post ipconfig /all results from your computer
when connected in your house.

Aside from the ipv6 issue, it really sounds as if there is a
misconfiguration at the TW end of your friend's connection.

To summarize for his next call to TW:

1. His computer doesn't connect in his house.
2. His computer does connect in your house.
3. Your computer does connect in your house.
4. Your computer doesn't connect in his house.

The above facts strongly suggest a defective or misconfigured cable
modem in your friend's house. However, if you have in fact tried a
second modem in your friend's house with the same results, the next
logical conclusion is a problem at the head end, but that doesn't
explain "TW confirmed (with their own laptop) that the connection &
modem are good."
 
D

dbir

Thanks for your ideas.

I did test with IPv6 turned on and turned off, with no effect. But I did
not uninstall it. Will keep this in mind.

(File & Print sharing is turned off -- he doesn't need it)

We swapped cable modems yesterday, to no effect.

I agree that most troubling symptom is "TW connected their computer and it
worked." I wasn't there to see that, and my neighbor doesn't know what the
TW guy did. In direct contradiction, when I connect my healthy computer, I
get exactly the same problem symptoms. Current speculations: maybe when TW
connected, he saw he got an IP address assigned and said, "It works; I'm
gone." Or maybe he went a step further and pinged the default gateway, and
when that worked, concluded all is well. Or, a friend speculates that maybe
he went for a web page that conveniently came from cache instead of the net.
Anyhow, TW comes again tomorrow (for the 3rd time), and this time, I'll be
there.

Wish I knew something about network management at an ISP's (like TW) side of
the net. I know they have our MAC and the level of service (speed) we are
buying. Does our line's properties have other settings (which could be
mis-typed) like "limit access to default gateway only"? Wish I knew what to
tell the TW Level 3 gal to look at/for.

Thanks again for your thoughts.



Lem said:
dbir said:
In case anyone is following this, here are today's developments:

Took my neighbor's problem computer to my house and connected it directly to
my Roadrunner modem. His computer accessed the internet OK without problems.

Took my healthy computer to my neighbor's house and connected it directly to
his Roadrunner modem. Got the same problem symptoms (can connect, receive IP
address from DHCP, and receive addresses of DNS servers, but cannot ping nor
access the DNSs nor anything beyond the Default Gateway).

Spent a few hours on phone with Time Warner (Roadrunner) level 1, 2, and 3
support trying lots of things, even swapping out the (new) cable modem
(desperate). Nothing worked.

We are about to give up, with my neighbor resigned to spending the rest of
his life on dial-up.

Any ideas?

Don
I don't know if it's the cause of your problems, but it appears as if
your friend's computer has extraneous networking components installed.

The ipconfig results that you posted look like ipv6 is installed. It
shouldn't be for XP Home.

Unless TW requires these added features for some reason, if you go to
the properties of the network adapter, you should only see the following
4 items (see http://screenshots.leeindy.com/lac_general.shtml):

- Client for Microsoft Networks
- QoS Packet Scheduler [this is optional]
- File and Printer Sharing [this also is optional, and in the case of a
computer connected directly to the Internet probably should not be
installed without first installing a firewall]
- Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)

If uninstalling ipv6 from your friend's computer doesn't resolve things,
it might be instructive to post ipconfig /all results from your computer
when connected in your house.

Aside from the ipv6 issue, it really sounds as if there is a
misconfiguration at the TW end of your friend's connection.

To summarize for his next call to TW:

1. His computer doesn't connect in his house.
2. His computer does connect in your house.
3. Your computer does connect in your house.
4. Your computer doesn't connect in his house.

The above facts strongly suggest a defective or misconfigured cable
modem in your friend's house. However, if you have in fact tried a
second modem in your friend's house with the same results, the next
logical conclusion is a problem at the head end, but that doesn't
explain "TW confirmed (with their own laptop) that the connection &
modem are good."
--
Lem -- MS-MVP

Apollo 11 - 40 years ago:
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/apollo/40th/index.html
 
D

dbir

Thanks for your input.

Yes, I knew about MAC. Buy a new computer? Gotta tell TW. Buy a router?
Gotta clone the computer NIC's MAC into it.

Lets just say I found a way to temporarily alter the MAC for testing
purposes. For either computer at the other's house, with MAC unaltered, we'd
get absolutely nothing -- no IP address nor anything. Dumb as a brick. Just
as it should be.

Disguising a computer (by duplicating the authorized computer's MAC) was
enough to produce valid test results:
My computer or his disguised computer, on my line work perfectly. Both
computers access the world.
My disguised computer or his computer, on his line: (1) receives an IP
address, (2) can ping default gateway and DHCP server, (3) cannot ping DNS
servers (we get 2), nor any other IP address (i.e. google's). Of course,
that results in no access to any internet sites at all. Identical symptoms
on both machines.

(I get those server addresses from network adapter's Status>Support>Details.)

Also, when we swapped cable modems at TW yesterday, they scaned bar-codes,
so by the time we got it home & hooked up, TW servers already knew the new
modem's MAC. Access problem/symptoms did not change. Other than the swap,
we have not moved modems around.

Thanks for the MAC clue. It could have been an impediment.



GbH said:
Lem said:
dbir said:
In case anyone is following this, here are today's developments:

Took my neighbor's problem computer to my house and connected it
directly to my Roadrunner modem. His computer accessed the internet
OK without problems.

Took my healthy computer to my neighbor's house and connected it
directly to his Roadrunner modem. Got the same problem symptoms (can
connect, receive IP address from DHCP, and receive addresses of DNS
servers, but cannot ping nor access the DNSs nor anything beyond the
Default Gateway).

Spent a few hours on phone with Time Warner (Roadrunner) level 1, 2,
and 3 support trying lots of things, even swapping out the (new)
cable modem (desperate). Nothing worked.

We are about to give up, with my neighbor resigned to spending the
rest of his life on dial-up.

Any ideas?

Don

:

My neighbor finally took the plunge to upgrade from dial-up to
cable, but cannot access the internet through it. He's using XP
Home, directly connected to cable modem - service by Time Warner,
which works fine for me next door. His dial-up continues to work
fine, but access through his Ethernet local area connection does
not. TW confirmed (with their own laptop) that the connection &
modem are good, so problem must be in his computer.

Network Diagnostics shows pings to his IP, Default Gateway, and DHCP
Server work, but pings to DNS servers fail. Verified manually
(pings to those DNS from my computer work, so it's not the DNS
themselves). Pings to other IPs (e.g., Google's) also fail.
Connection's Status shows lots of packets sent, but almost none
received. Uninstalled Norton 360 with no effect. No other security
software present, Windows Firewall turned off. TCP/IP properties
and IP addresses received (DNS, DHCP) look fine (same external IP
addresses my computer gets).
Other things checked:
Boot in Safe Mode yields same results. Device Manger shows no
problems with Network Adapter or (hidden) TCP/IP drivers. Packet
Filtering is off. All Windows components (needed or not) are
installed, all services (needed or not) are started or on auto.
Windows SFC ran OK.

From all the sage advice I found on this board, here's what I've
tried (without success):
reset TCP/IP (netsh int ip reset)
turned off ipsec service (temp)
ipconfig /flushdns
ipconfig /registerdns

So: dial-up works fine, and Ethernet HW/SW gets as far as gateway &
DHCP, but can't get to DNS nor anything else.

I'm a bit over my head, and sure need some advice. Thanks.
I don't know if it's the cause of your problems, but it appears as if
your friend's computer has extraneous networking components installed.

The ipconfig results that you posted look like ipv6 is installed. It
shouldn't be for XP Home.

Unless TW requires these added features for some reason, if you go to
the properties of the network adapter, you should only see the
following 4 items (see
http://screenshots.leeindy.com/lac_general.shtml):

- Client for Microsoft Networks
- QoS Packet Scheduler [this is optional]
- File and Printer Sharing [this also is optional, and in the case of
a computer connected directly to the Internet probably should not be
installed without first installing a firewall]
- Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)

If uninstalling ipv6 from your friend's computer doesn't resolve
things, it might be instructive to post ipconfig /all results from
your computer when connected in your house.

Aside from the ipv6 issue, it really sounds as if there is a
misconfiguration at the TW end of your friend's connection.

To summarize for his next call to TW:

1. His computer doesn't connect in his house.
2. His computer does connect in your house.
3. Your computer does connect in your house.
4. Your computer doesn't connect in his house.

The above facts strongly suggest a defective or misconfigured cable
modem in your friend's house. However, if you have in fact tried a
second modem in your friend's house with the same results, the next
logical conclusion is a problem at the head end, but that doesn't
explain "TW confirmed (with their own laptop) that the connection &
modem are good."
--
Lem -- MS-MVP

Apollo 11 - 40 years ago:
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/apollo/40th/index.html

Lot of ISPs use MAC addressing to limit hardware access to specific
(usually their own) units, sounds like it could be corrupt for the modem
at your friends house.
It will require a house call to set it right, or a new/replacement
preconfigured unit.
 
D

dbir

Final result: my neighbor has broadband! Problem solved.

Although the story has a happy ending, the details are muddled. The problem
was definitely in his computer. Nothing was changed on the TW side.

That computer has two ethernet NICs: one from Intel (built-in), and one
from Linksys (appears to be a part of the expalsion card with the dial-up
recepticals). Most of my testing was with the Intel NIC. I ran Intel's
diagnostics on it without problems. And, it was the Intel NIC that worked
successfully at my house. Everything described in this thread was through
the Intel card.

TW guy came today, and after showing me his TW laptop worked on my
neighbor's line (more on that later), he tried the line on the Intel NIC, and
it failed as usual. He then plugged it into the Linksys NIC, and much to my
surprise, it worked!

I had previously tested that NIC without success. Turns out the difference
is (I think), every time he moved a connection, he cleared the modem by
unplugging it for 30 seconds. I had not done that. This is an important
lesson.

We don't know why the Intel NIC didn't work on my neighbor's line, but
worked perfectly on my line. But we no longer care.

The first thing the TW guy did was to plug in his laptop and demonstrate
that it worked. But wait, I did not see him change the MAC of his laptop
(nor phone anyone). How can that be? Had him do ipconfig /all on his
laptop, and his NIC doesn't even have a MAC(!). We talked about MACs. He
says he has never had to change a MAC nor tell the home office to change one.
I never reached understanding with him on the MAC and how TW uses it to
prevent service theft. My assumption now is that this MAC control is
occurring in the cable modem, and that clearing it with power off causes it
to loose its previously-stored value.

That's all I know. Just wanted to share the end of this story, in case it
is useful for someone else in the future.

All's well that ends well. Thanks to everyone who helped.

-Don
 
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L

Lem

dbir said:
Final result: my neighbor has broadband! Problem solved.

Although the story has a happy ending, the details are muddled. The problem
was definitely in his computer. Nothing was changed on the TW side.

That computer has two ethernet NICs: one from Intel (built-in), and one
from Linksys (appears to be a part of the expalsion card with the dial-up
recepticals). Most of my testing was with the Intel NIC. I ran Intel's
diagnostics on it without problems. And, it was the Intel NIC that worked
successfully at my house. Everything described in this thread was through
the Intel card.

TW guy came today, and after showing me his TW laptop worked on my
neighbor's line (more on that later), he tried the line on the Intel NIC, and
it failed as usual. He then plugged it into the Linksys NIC, and much to my
surprise, it worked!

I had previously tested that NIC without success. Turns out the difference
is (I think), every time he moved a connection, he cleared the modem by
unplugging it for 30 seconds. I had not done that. This is an important
lesson.

We don't know why the Intel NIC didn't work on my neighbor's line, but
worked perfectly on my line. But we no longer care.

The first thing the TW guy did was to plug in his laptop and demonstrate
that it worked. But wait, I did not see him change the MAC of his laptop
(nor phone anyone). How can that be? Had him do ipconfig /all on his
laptop, and his NIC doesn't even have a MAC(!). We talked about MACs. He
says he has never had to change a MAC nor tell the home office to change one.
I never reached understanding with him on the MAC and how TW uses it to
prevent service theft. My assumption now is that this MAC control is
occurring in the cable modem, and that clearing it with power off causes it
to loose its previously-stored value.

That's all I know. Just wanted to share the end of this story, in case it
is useful for someone else in the future.

All's well that ends well. Thanks to everyone who helped.

-Don

Thanks for letting us know.

Your conclusion about the cable modem is correct. When the modem is
powered off for the appropriate time (in your case 30 seconds), the MAC
address restriction is cleared and the modem then accepts the MAC
address of the device next connected to it.

Interestingly, the Linksys NIC doesn't show in the ipconfig /all results
you posted on 8/24.

It's possible that with 3 possible wireless configuration utilities
(Windows, Linksys, and Intel) installed, there is some odd interaction
going on (as a general rule, you should only use one). However, your
current position is the correct one -- as long as things are working
now, don't mess with them further.
 
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D

dbir

Just want to clear up a couple loose ends.

I think ipconfig /all only shows enabled connections. When I disable all
connections on my machine, the reply is just the heading "Windows IP
Configuration" and nothing else. On my neighbor's machine, the Linksys
adapter was disabled when I did the ipconfig on 8/24. At that time, I was
seeing it as "redundant junk", thus ignoring it. I did test it at one point,
but without clearing the modem, I got identical problem results.

There are no wireless connections on my neighbor's computer. There are the
two Ethernets (the problematic Intel, and the now-working Linksys), and a
dial-up (for temporary internet access during the problem period). As a
general rule (and especially throughout the troubleshooting period), only one
connection was enabled at any given time.

Again, thanks for your insight and advice.


-Don
 

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