2nd Request: SCSIPORT.SYS 0x50 BSD

  • Thread starter System Administrator
  • Start date

S

System Administrator

Original Posting: Sat, 12 May 2007 18:23 GMT

I have a Windows 2000 Server based server. The motherboard has an
onboard SCSI controller controlling only a tape drive. There is an
Adaptec SCSI controller in a PCI slot controlling the system drive
(RAID5). I want to add an eSATA controller but the system BIOS will
not support another "SCSI" type device. To get around this, I decided
to disable use of the tape drive as it isn't being used. So, I
uninstalled the onboard SCSI device (two instances) in Windows' Device
Manager, rebooted into the system BIOS and disabled the onboard SCSI
controller. I then double checked the boot device sequence - it was
still pointed to the RAID5 controller and rebooted. I then received a
BSD with 0x50 stop error in scsiport.sys. I attempted to boot into
safe mode per the BSD instructions and still received the BSD 0x50
scsiport.sys stop error. Any ideas on how to resolve this problem?
Thanks.

Additional, 18 May: Windows 2000 Server OS is at SP4 level with all
latest updates
 
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G

Gary Chanson

System Administrator said:
Original Posting: Sat, 12 May 2007 18:23 GMT

I have a Windows 2000 Server based server. The motherboard has an
onboard SCSI controller controlling only a tape drive. There is an
Adaptec SCSI controller in a PCI slot controlling the system drive
(RAID5). I want to add an eSATA controller but the system BIOS will
not support another "SCSI" type device. To get around this, I decided
to disable use of the tape drive as it isn't being used. So, I
uninstalled the onboard SCSI device (two instances) in Windows' Device
Manager, rebooted into the system BIOS and disabled the onboard SCSI
controller. I then double checked the boot device sequence - it was
still pointed to the RAID5 controller and rebooted. I then received a
BSD with 0x50 stop error in scsiport.sys. I attempted to boot into
safe mode per the BSD instructions and still received the BSD 0x50
scsiport.sys stop error. Any ideas on how to resolve this problem?
Thanks.

Additional, 18 May: Windows 2000 Server OS is at SP4 level with all
latest updates

First, disabling the device in Windows would have no effect of boot
order. If you want to disable the on-board SCSI controller, the place to do
it is in CMOS Setup.

It sounds like you may have disabled both SCSI controllers in Windows
and that's why boot is failing. If so, you may have painted yourself into a
nasty corner. If not, disabling the on-board SCSI controller in CMOS Setup
may get you past the problem.

I suspect that even disabling the on-board controller will not fix the
boot order. It's possible that the only way of controlling which add-on
card it boots from will be by moving the cards around. If you're lucky, it
will try to boot from the first "SCSI" card it finds. If you're not lucky,
it will always try to boot from the real SCSI card and never from the SATA
card.
 
B

Bob Felton

Thanks for your response, Gary.

No, I did not delete the wrong controllers in Windows. They have
clearly different names in Device Manager than the Adaptec controller
controlling the system drive.

Boot order is set in the BIOS and after disabling the onboard SCSI
controller in BIOS the boot device was still set to the Adaptec
controller controlling the system drive.

Once I re-enabled the onboard SCSI controller in BIOS, the system
booted back into Windows withourt error. Windows re-detected the
previously deleted devices and re-installed support for them without
error. System was back running as it was before I disabled the
onboard SCSI controller.

What I did not do in the attempt to disable the onboard SCSI
controller was to also delete from Windows in Device Manager the tape
drive connected to the onbard SCSI controller at the same time I
deleted the controller in Device Manager. Would having this device
still installed in Windows cause the scsiport.sys stop error upon next
boot with the associated controller having been disabled in BIOS and
previously deleted in Device Manager?

Your assistance in this matter is very much appreciated.
 
G

Gary Chanson

Bob Felton said:
Thanks for your response, Gary.

No, I did not delete the wrong controllers in Windows. They have
clearly different names in Device Manager than the Adaptec controller
controlling the system drive.

Boot order is set in the BIOS and after disabling the onboard SCSI
controller in BIOS the boot device was still set to the Adaptec
controller controlling the system drive.

Once I re-enabled the onboard SCSI controller in BIOS, the system
booted back into Windows withourt error. Windows re-detected the
previously deleted devices and re-installed support for them without
error. System was back running as it was before I disabled the
onboard SCSI controller.

What I did not do in the attempt to disable the onboard SCSI
controller was to also delete from Windows in Device Manager the tape
drive connected to the onbard SCSI controller at the same time I
deleted the controller in Device Manager. Would having this device
still installed in Windows cause the scsiport.sys stop error upon next
boot with the associated controller having been disabled in BIOS and
previously deleted in Device Manager?

Your assistance in this matter is very much appreciated.

You can try it, but Plug And Pray should handle all of that
automatically.

It's not clear that disabling the on-board controller will fix your boot
order problem anyway so maybe you should ignore that for the moment. Try
swapping the positions of the SCSI and SATA boards as see if that effects
which one the BIOS lets you select.
 
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B

Bob Felton

Gary, the eSATA controller is not installed and I don't have any boot
order problems at this time. A month ago I did try installing the
eSATA controller and that's when I discovered the BIOS wouldn't
support more than two SCSI type devices (the Adaptec controller no
longer showed up in the boot selections; only the onboard SCSI
controller and the eSATA controller showed up). So, I removed the
eSATA controller and the system went back to working properly.

It was a week or so ago when I thought about disabling the onboard
SCSI controller so as to remove a SCSI device from the system which, I
thought, would then allow me to install the eSATA controller. I
decided to do things in stages: First, disable the onboard controller
and see if the system worked; Second, if #1 worked, then try
installing the eSATA controller. I haven't gotten to #2 as yet due to
the scsiport.sys stop error when I disable the onboard SCSI controller
in BIOS.

Thanks for your continued support on this issue.
 

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