Windows XP / Windows 2000 Upgrade - Need a definitive answer

M

m7csat

Hi:

I've been working with comptuers for several years now, so I would
consder myself an advanced user.

I'm running Windows 2000 Pro SP 4. Bought the upgrade to Windows XP.
Put the disk in. It didn't recognize my OS, so it performed a clean
install. Now, I have a dual boot machine with Windows 2000 and Windows
XP on the same partition. Problem is I don't want a dual boot machine.

I haven't activated my copy of XP yet.

So I was wondering . . . Is it possible to get rid of the Windows XP
dual boot and attempt the upgrade again? This time from within Windows
2000.

Or am I just better off backing up my data, deteling the partition and
starting all over again?

Before you give me a answer, let me tell you that would be a pain. I
have everything set up the way I like it on Windows 2000 and I have
Adobe Creative Suite with Macromedia installed, which require
activation themselves.

Regards,
Frustrated Computer Geek
 
L

Larry Samuels

Let me guess--you purchased the XP Home upgrade?

You cannot upgrade from 2000 pro to XP Home, you can only upgrade to XP pro.

You can do a clean install with the XP home upgrade.

--
Larry Samuels Associate Expert
MS-MVP (2001-2005)
Unofficial FAQ for Windows Server 2003 at
http://pelos.us/SERVER.htm
Expert Zone-
 
M

m7csat

Larry said:
Let me guess--you purchased the XP Home upgrade?

You cannot upgrade from 2000 pro to XP Home, you can only upgrade to XP pro.

You can do a clean install with the XP home upgrade.

Hi Larry:

Nope. XP Pro. I knew that already. My mistake thinking this was like
any other Windows installation and you had to boot from CD . . .

Obviously, I didn't read the nice little flyer that came with the
upgrade and muffed myself. I just need to know if it's possible to
unmuff myself.

Regards,
FCG
 
L

Larry Samuels

It should be possible to boot to the 2000 install and run the upgrade from
within windows. After that is complete you can edit boot.ini and delete
folders to eliminate the extra install of XP.

--
Larry Samuels Associate Expert
MS-MVP (2001-2005)
Unofficial FAQ for Windows Server 2003 at
http://pelos.us/SERVER.htm
Expert Zone-
 
G

Guest

Larry Samuels said:
It should be possible to boot to the 2000 install and run the upgrade from
within windows. After that is complete you can edit boot.ini and delete
folders to eliminate the extra install of XP.

--
Larry Samuels Associate Expert
MS-MVP (2001-2005)
Unofficial FAQ for Windows Server 2003 at
http://pelos.us/SERVER.htm
Expert Zone-
 
G

Guest

Larry Samuels said:
It should be possible to boot to the 2000 install and run the upgrade from
within windows. After that is complete you can edit boot.ini and delete
folders to eliminate the extra install of XP.

--
Larry Samuels Associate Expert
MS-MVP (2001-2005)
Unofficial FAQ for Windows Server 2003 at
http://pelos.us/SERVER.htm
Expert Zone-
 
G

Guest

I have the same problem but when I went to run boot.ini I got an error
message that windows could not find "boot.ini". What am I doing wrong. I know
I must have booting options. My laptop is so sloooooow with 2 OS loaded. I
need to get one off. Thanks for any suggestions.
 
M

m7csat

Donna said:
I have the same problem but when I went to run boot.ini I got an error
message that windows could not find "boot.ini". What am I doing wrong. I know
I must have booting options. My laptop is so sloooooow with 2 OS loaded. I
need to get one off. Thanks for any suggestions.

Hi everyone:

I'm actually running XP now. Had a friend who was a geek telll me what
to do, then there was a call to Microsoft Support because I
terminedated the install process too soon . . . But the key is the
drama is over and I'm running! Yeah!

Donna, to answer you question, boot.ini is one of those system
protected hidden files. You need to go into your C drive and go to
Tools, Click on Folder Options, Select View and make sure that Hide
Protected System Files (Recommend) is unchecked. Then you should be
able to see the boot.ini file.

As far as editing it and deleting the second operating system, I'll
leave that to those experts who are more expert than me. Only reason
I'm being cautious here is that if it isn't done right, you could mess
up your system even worse.

Regards,
Not So Frustrated Computer Geek.
 

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