Why not external power bricks for desktop PC?


M

me

Is it possible to use an external power "brick" for a
desktop like a laptop uses in order to keep the heat
and such OUT of the box?
 
M

meerkat

Is it possible to use an external power "brick" for a
desktop like a laptop uses in order to keep the heat
and such OUT of the box?
..
The PSU has a rear exhaust fan (or 2), that helps to keep the
heat out of the box.
 
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D

DaveW

If you are familiar with how the PSU connects to the components inside the
computer case with its dozen various lengths cables, then you know that your
idea is not feasible.
 
P

peter

Ah! but it is feasable......all power connectors can have extensions. It
really depends on how "far" out of the case.
Nowadays they even make PSUs that are made to be used outside of the
case...in some instances with a small connector box inside the case but the
main PSU outside.
peter
 
K

KlausK

Is it possible to use an external power "brick" for a
desktop like a laptop uses in order to keep the heat
and such OUT of the box?
Absolutely. Check Newegg.
 
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M

me

DaveW said:
If you are familiar with how the PSU connects to the components inside the
computer case with its dozen various lengths cables, then you know that your
idea is not feasible.
Ahh..... I see now

Thanks!!
 
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Excellent thought! I had the same concern 5 years ago, when I realized that in every hardaware change I had also take in considaration the famine of the integrated PSU. Which was a pain in the ass changing PSU's and some time cases. My wallet was getting from thin to thinner!
Before going outthere and buy one of theese "boxes" you might think a little bit further
a. buy a general use AC/DC psu or a plain transformator to stepdown to 24 VAC.
2. use some extras power regulators (stepup/stepdown)
3. some electrological equipment (cables, aluminium box, irrigators, etc)
All this is going to cost significant more less, with no fear of depreciating your investment.
Just for the beggining.
Define max Watt consumpition (110 VAC / 60 Hz to 25 VAC / 60 Hz for 6 Amperes will result satisfying 660 Watts, or 220VAC / 50 Hz to 25 VAC for 5 Amperes will satisfy the demand for 1100 Watts, for continious operation, add a 25 % in the current in each case for start / peak instances so instead of 6 or 5 Amperes use 8 Amperes).
There a lot of drawnings reffering the making of an excellent stabilized output. Irrigators will avoid the need for fans if they' re used dor cooling power transistors.
Finally all those items can be found on one store with no need running here and there. Also Internet can lead you on those (e.g. ebay, amazon, banggood, etc)
HAVE FUN!
 
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unknown guest and fethry - great minds think alike!
I'm fascinated to discover that you've actually succeeded in doing this fethry.
I'd like to learn more about how to do it myself.
I'd also like to go one step further and put a backup battery between the DC supply and the computer, so that the PC can work like a laptop for a limited amount of time.
I've found a good quality DC supply - http://www.excelsys.com/xsolo or http://www.excelsys.com/ux4/
The question now is, how do I go about wiring the DC supply to the motherboard components - the power regulators you speak of in step 2.
Let's forget about the crazy idea of using a battery for the moment.
 
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I've just found some instructions on how to connect your computer to DC power on wikihow:
http://www.wikihow.com/Run-Your-Desktop-off-DC-Power.

The author suggests buying a DC-DC ATX Power Supply Unit, and running it off a big power tool battery.
I'm not sure how the ATX PSU thing connects to the components on the motherboard, or which ATX PSU thing to buy for, say, a 95W TDP processor, but it seems that it's all very do-able if you have the know-how.
 
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