Toe-tale


Taffycat

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Three days ago (Tuesday) I underwent toenail surgery at the Podiatry Department of our local hospital.

No, it's okay, I'm not going to gross anyone out by going into minute detail about the procedure - would I be that cruel? ;)

Basically, I had two options. Either they could remove just the sides of my toenail, which were causing quite a lot of pain, or, I could have the whole nail removed, which would prevent a possible recurrence of the problem. Oh, and I could, of course, just leave things as they were, however, that was not a serious option for me.

The Podiatrist was a guy whom I would guess to be in his thirties. He was very easy to get along with, and at my "assessment" appointment, he took the time to explain all that I needed to know, before making my decision. I would have a week to think about it.

I was careful to keep away from the YouTube horror stories, or blogs with scary blow-by-blow descriptions. It seemed more sensible to absorbe the info I'd been given, by the chappie who would be performing the deed! But of course, in the meanwhile, a gory-story broke in the press, regarding a young female who apparently paid to have her foot amputated, following "complications" after toenail surgery. Oh cr@p!

My totally laid-back attitude, became ever-so-slightly less positive. The Podiatrist had read the story too, but chatting with him, he quickly restored my confidence and once again, I felt happy for him to proceed.

It was actually quite interesting. I sat up and watched as he deftly worked on the offending nail. (It was, of course, full of local anaesthetic, so there was no discomfort.) A nurse sat in one corner of the room, but she mainly dealt with the written consent form and that kind of thing. They both were happy to chat and they even remarked that it was good to be able to do so; apparently some patients don't say a word (understandable if they are nervous, of course) so the room is thrown into total silence. The Podiatrist and nurse both admitted that they both felt a bit uncomfortable when that happens, because on such occasions, they are concerned about appearing to be rude, if they just chat amongst themselves.

Anyway, half an hour later, with a slightly bulky dressing and I was good to go! I was told keep the foot elevated, then to return on the following day to have the dressing changed and inspected. From then on, I would need to do that myself, daily.... which is really the only slight drawback, because my "dodgy" back is currently very painful. This really doesn't help with the contortions necessary in applying dressings to a big-toe! :rolleyes:

I should perhaps add, that even when the feeling returned to my toe, I was not in pain. An occasional dull ache that evening, and an occasional mild twinge since, but no throbbing or intense pain. So I'm pretty impressed. When this one has healed, I don't think I will be at all worried about getting the other one fixed-up. :thumb:
 

Becky

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I'm glad to hear it went well TC! Must have been pretty interesting to watch. Sorry to hear your back is problematic at the moment, that can't be easy for you right now. One of my favourite back remedies is my heat pad (this one) - it's so soothing, even when painkillers aren't helping. Well worth a try if you haven't got one already.

My step-dad recently had a minor procedure done on his toenail - the nail on his big toe was ingrowing slightly at the sides and causing him a lot of pain, so the person he saw attached a sprung metal clip. It clips around the sides of the nail and sits across the middle. Apparently it encourages the nail to flatten out as it grows, and once the curly nail has fully grown out you don't need the clip any more. It's still early days for my step-dad though, so I don't know how well it will work in practice, but fingers crossed.

What is the expected recovery time for your toe?
 
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Taffycat

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Ooh, that sprung metal clip device your step-dad is trying, sounds pretty interesting. Does he find it uncomfortable at all? I would imagine that it would relieve the pressure of the ingrown area quite a lot, so I hope it will be successful for him.

What is the expected recovery time for your toe?
The Podiatrist seemed to think that it would take around 4 - 6 weeks. I think much will depend on the aftercare - following the advice about re-dressing daily, keeping it clean (of course) and avoiding pressure, or stubbing the toe... ouchie! :eek: :)

Oh yes, and the heat-pad is very soothing (for the back probs.) I also try to move around as much as I can in between. Ugh, backs eh? :rolleyes:
 

muckshifter

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ah, I have a different story!

I have/had ingrowing Big toenails and as a diabetic was having regular feet assessments. I noted that my left big toe would not stop bleeding under the nail. So, I quite quicky got an appointment with our local "Health & Wellbeing Center" where these 'minor' opps are performed.

Quickly passing over the gory details, I had just the sides of my toenail removed, was going to do both toes, but fortunately ran out of time as it took him 3 hours to stop the bleeding, and, I wasn't in the mood for a repeat anyway.

It took 13 months to 'heal' sufficiently before I could wear a pair of shoes without my toe beading. My toe still hurts after nearly 3 years ... My right toe is NOT going to 'suffer' the same fate. :)

Hey! don't let me put you off, YMMV, my 'problem' is probably a combination of bad toe behaviour or diabetic foot associated problem.


I'm really glad you have had a positive experience TC. :thumb:
 

Taffycat

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I'm really glad you have had a positive experience TC. :thumb:
Thank you Mucks, and I am really sorry to think that your experience was such a bummer. :( I realise that I am extremely fortunate not to be a diabetic, which probably influenced your extended period of recovery. It sounds like you endured a pretty horrendous time - three hours of bleeding! Yikes! :eek:

I almost chose the "sides" option too, but the Podiatrist told me that removal of the whole nail, is a procedure which heals more quickly than the removal of just the sides option.

To be honest, I also feel that I was very fortunate in being referred to the Podiatry department of the hospital, because the guy who treated me, mentioned that he performs 8 of these procedures on his operating day, each week. So he certainly gets lots of practice. (Originally, I was just going to be referred to one of our GPs who happens to perform minor surgeries of various kinds, within our health centre. But thankfully, I was discouraged from following this option, by a Podiatrist I was seeing, on an unrelated matter, about a year ago.)

Unhappily, for every person who might have a "good" experience, I guess there will always be others, for whom things did not go too well. I am sorry that you are in that situation @Mucks. :nod:
 
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Surprise, surprise this ex Fireman is very squeamish cannot stand the sight of blood especially mine. Going out to RTC's and other bloody incidents with people screaming (there ok but the quiet ones are the to worry about) but my blood different matter.:eek: I think you are both very brave.
 

nivrip

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Three days ago (Tuesday) I underwent toenail surgery at the Podiatry Department of our local hospital.

No, it's okay, I'm not going to gross anyone out by going into minute detail about the procedure - would I be that cruel? ;)
Oh, please do, TC.

I love a gory tale. :D
 

nivrip

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attached a sprung metal clip. It clips around the sides of the nail and sits across the middle. Apparently it encourages the nail to flatten out as it grows, and once the curly nail has fully grown out you don't need the clip any more.
Crikey ! Sounds like an ancient torture device. :D

And how do you get your shoe on over the nine months or so that it takes a big toe nail to grow out? :)
 

muckshifter

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I was told, you need to cut your toenails straight across ... I've never seen straight toenail cutters, or flathead toes. :)
 

nivrip

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I was told, you need to cut your toenails straight across ... I've never seen straight toenail cutters, or flathead toes. :)
Use a sturdy pair of scissors to cut straight across. :)

Never cut down into the edges - it simply encourages ingrowing. :nod:
 

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Ooh, that sprung metal clip device your step-dad is trying, sounds pretty interesting. Does he find it uncomfortable at all? I would imagine that it would relieve the pressure of the ingrown area quite a lot, so I hope it will be successful for him.
He said it was uncomfortable having them fitted (there was no local anaesthetic) but fine afterwards. When we last saw him he stubbed his toe and that seemed to really hurt him, but other than that I think it really helped. Hopefully it will help the nail grow straighter like it's meant to!

Crikey ! Sounds like an ancient torture device. :D

And how do you get your shoe on over the nine months or so that it takes a big toe nail to grow out? :)
It's just a small strip of metal that lies across the nail - a little like this:

 

Taffycat

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He said it was uncomfortable having them fitted (there was no local anaesthetic) but fine afterwards.
Ouch! Yes, I can imagine that fitting it might be rather painful, but probably quite a relief when the pressure was taken off those side areas. It looks a lot neater than I imagined.

And how do you get your shoe on over the nine months or so that it takes a big toe nail to grow out? :)
I imagine that shoes would be less uncomfortable to manage, once the device begins to do its job(?) Wearing shoes - the sort with enclosed toes, that is - has been a bit of a nightmare for me, for the past year or more. So with the pressure reduced (by the device) my impression is that it would help a lot.
 
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Oh no you don't, that would be cruel and I would be sick all over my nice new illuminated keyboard:blush::blush::blush:
 
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