Seriously, has anybody dual booted XP with Linux and had problems?Do you use GAG or Grub boot loader


R

RayLopez99

Against my better judgment, I decided maybe to dual boot Linux with XP
(XP being installed first). I found a tutorial using Ubuntu for Linux
on how to do this (http://apcmag.com/
how_to_dual_boot_windows_xp_and_linux_xp_installed_first.htm) that
tries to make it look so easy, but the problem is in the MBR which
sometimes gets corrupted. To solve this, I found a Windows freeware
program called GAG http://www.softpedia.com/get/System/Boot-Manager-Disk/GAG-d.shtml

In Linux you can use the dual boot manager Grub (?) I think.

I'm asking if this is a good idea, if anybody has had any problems,
and what utilities, like GAG or Grub, they use.

Target machine: Pentium 4, 50 GB HD (IDE)--just one drive, so I'll
have to partition it, 1 GB RAM, currently with Windows XP installed.
Linux OS: I think Mint. I downloaded Puppy Live CD also today, and
it's much smaller, because Mike Easter likes it for LiveCD surfing of
the net (it's faster). But now that I might go the dual boot route, I
think Mint might be more robust for a HD installation.

Any thoughts appreciated. Rex Ballard and Aragorn: feel free to
write a step-by-step tutorial that runs for 100 pages and ages--I
promise to read all of it. This time I'm serious--wolf, wolf--and no
I'm not just posing these questions to see if the thread grows to 100
replies. In the last time we got to 99--cool.

Yes I can see the value of dual booting Linux: you can lern Linux at
your own pace, if you are a WIndows user, and at the same time use
Linux to surf the net faster than with a LiveCD distro. I realize you
cannot--absent a Virtual OS setup which Mike and Norm like--'hot swap'
between OSes on the fly. I had NT and Redhat dual booted ages ago (I
used a utility called BootMagic, now discontinued, to help). But it
is useful to dual boot for the reasons I just stated.

Thank you for your attention. Let the flames begin...

RL

Random info from surfing the net below...

http://apcmag.com/how_to_dual_boot_windows_xp_and_linux_xp_installed_first.htm


Boot Magic ( v. 1.0 ) - complete package (discontinued)
Accepted For a system that multi-boots different version...
For a system that multi-boots different versions of Windows, there
is not a lot of value to a boot manager utility. So long as you
install the different versions of Windows in the order they were
released, the Windows boot loader should take care of things.
The only tricky thing with the Windows boot loader is setting the
default OS.
The main value of a boot manager is when you are running different
styles of operating systems. Such as a system that dual boots Linux
and Windows. Or a true DOS OS and Windows.
Chas
Posted: 04/09/2006 @ 04:27 PM (PDT)

why do you need a boot manager.....just load the OSes....
separate partitions are ok, I prefer different drives for multibooting
only conceivable problem is boot.ini being rewritten -
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/323427/en-us

Free boot manager. Allows boot of up to 9 different operating systems
http://www.softpedia.com/get/System/Boot-Manager-Disk/GAG-d.shtml

GAG description
free boot manager. Allows boot of up to 9 different operating systems

GAG is a Boot Manager application. It's loaded when the computer is
turned on and allows you to choose the operating system you want to
use.

Here are some key features of "GAG d":

· Allows boot of up to 9 different operating systems.
· It can boot operating systems installed in primary and extended
partitions on any available hard disk.
· Can be installed from nearly all operating systems.
· GAG doesn't need its own partition. It installs itself in the first
track of the hard disk, wich is reserved for these kinds of programs.
It can also be instaled on a floppy disk, without using the hard disk.
· It has a timer to boot a default operating system (selectable by the
user).
· The configuration menu can be protected with a password.
· The program works in graphic mode (needs a VGA or better graphic
card), and has a lot of icons.
· Hides the primary partitions which allows the user to have instaled
more than one DOS and/or Windows in the same hard disk.
· Allows a password to be put on each operating system, denying access
to non-authorized people.
· Allows the boot manager text to be translated to all languages.
· Can exchange disk drives, allowing to boot from the second, third...
hard disk operating systems such as MS-DOS.
· Has the SafeBoot system, that allows to boot your hard disk even if
GAG is accidentally overwrited.
· Supports a great variety of keyboards (QWERTY, AZERTY, QWERTZ and
DVORAK keyboards).
· Fully support for hard disks up to 4 terabytes (4096 gigabytes).

What's New in This Release: [ read full changelog ]
 
Ad

Advertisements

A

Alias

Against my better judgment, I decided maybe to dual boot Linux with XP
(XP being installed first). I found a tutorial using Ubuntu for Linux
on how to do this (http://apcmag.com/
how_to_dual_boot_windows_xp_and_linux_xp_installed_first.htm) that
tries to make it look so easy, but the problem is in the MBR which
sometimes gets corrupted. To solve this, I found a Windows freeware
program called GAG http://www.softpedia.com/get/System/Boot-Manager-Disk/GAG-d.shtml

In Linux you can use the dual boot manager Grub (?) I think.

I'm asking if this is a good idea, if anybody has had any problems,
and what utilities, like GAG or Grub, they use.

Target machine: Pentium 4, 50 GB HD (IDE)--just one drive, so I'll
have to partition it, 1 GB RAM, currently with Windows XP installed.
Linux OS: I think Mint. I downloaded Puppy Live CD also today, and
it's much smaller, because Mike Easter likes it for LiveCD surfing of
the net (it's faster). But now that I might go the dual boot route, I
think Mint might be more robust for a HD installation.

Any thoughts appreciated. Rex Ballard and Aragorn: feel free to
write a step-by-step tutorial that runs for 100 pages and ages--I
promise to read all of it. This time I'm serious--wolf, wolf--and no
I'm not just posing these questions to see if the thread grows to 100
replies. In the last time we got to 99--cool.

Yes I can see the value of dual booting Linux: you can lern Linux at
your own pace, if you are a WIndows user, and at the same time use
Linux to surf the net faster than with a LiveCD distro. I realize you
cannot--absent a Virtual OS setup which Mike and Norm like--'hot swap'
between OSes on the fly. I had NT and Redhat dual booted ages ago (I
used a utility called BootMagic, now discontinued, to help). But it
is useful to dual boot for the reasons I just stated.

Thank you for your attention. Let the flames begin...

RL

Random info from surfing the net below...

http://apcmag.com/how_to_dual_boot_windows_xp_and_linux_xp_installed_first.htm


Boot Magic ( v. 1.0 ) - complete package (discontinued)
Accepted For a system that multi-boots different version...
For a system that multi-boots different versions of Windows, there
is not a lot of value to a boot manager utility. So long as you
install the different versions of Windows in the order they were
released, the Windows boot loader should take care of things.
The only tricky thing with the Windows boot loader is setting the
default OS.
The main value of a boot manager is when you are running different
styles of operating systems. Such as a system that dual boots Linux
and Windows. Or a true DOS OS and Windows.
Chas
Posted: 04/09/2006 @ 04:27 PM (PDT)

why do you need a boot manager.....just load the OSes....
separate partitions are ok, I prefer different drives for multibooting
only conceivable problem is boot.ini being rewritten -
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/323427/en-us

Free boot manager. Allows boot of up to 9 different operating systems
http://www.softpedia.com/get/System/Boot-Manager-Disk/GAG-d.shtml

GAG description
free boot manager. Allows boot of up to 9 different operating systems

GAG is a Boot Manager application. It's loaded when the computer is
turned on and allows you to choose the operating system you want to
use.

Here are some key features of "GAG d":

· Allows boot of up to 9 different operating systems.
· It can boot operating systems installed in primary and extended
partitions on any available hard disk.
· Can be installed from nearly all operating systems.
· GAG doesn't need its own partition. It installs itself in the first
track of the hard disk, wich is reserved for these kinds of programs.
It can also be instaled on a floppy disk, without using the hard disk.
· It has a timer to boot a default operating system (selectable by the
user).
· The configuration menu can be protected with a password.
· The program works in graphic mode (needs a VGA or better graphic
card), and has a lot of icons.
· Hides the primary partitions which allows the user to have instaled
more than one DOS and/or Windows in the same hard disk.
· Allows a password to be put on each operating system, denying access
to non-authorized people.
· Allows the boot manager text to be translated to all languages.
· Can exchange disk drives, allowing to boot from the second, third...
hard disk operating systems such as MS-DOS.
· Has the SafeBoot system, that allows to boot your hard disk even if
GAG is accidentally overwrited.
· Supports a great variety of keyboards (QWERTY, AZERTY, QWERTZ and
DVORAK keyboards).
· Fully support for hard disks up to 4 terabytes (4096 gigabytes).

What's New in This Release: [ read full changelog ]

If you install XP first and then Mint, Mint will create Grub so you can
dual boot. Be sure and leave a partition for Mint when you install XP.
You may want to check out alt.os.linux.mint for support.
 
R

RayLopez99

Against my better judgment, I decided maybe to dual boot Linux with XP
(XP being installed first).  I found a tutorial using Ubuntu for Linux
on how to do this (http://apcmag.com/
how_to_dual_boot_windows_xp_and_linux_xp_installed_first.htm) that
tries to make it look so easy, but the problem is in the MBR which
sometimes gets corrupted.  To solve this, I found a Windows freeware
program called GAGhttp://www.softpedia.com/get/System/Boot-Manager-Disk/GAG-d.shtml
In Linux you can use the dual boot manager Grub (?) I think.
I'm asking if this is a good idea, if anybody has had any problems,
and what utilities, like GAG or Grub, they use.
Target machine: Pentium 4, 50 GB HD (IDE)--just one drive, so I'll
have to partition it, 1 GB RAM, currently with Windows XP installed.
Linux OS: I think Mint.  I downloaded Puppy Live CD also today, and
it's much smaller, because Mike Easter likes it for LiveCD surfing of
the net (it's faster).  But now that I might go the dual boot route, I
think Mint might be more robust for a HD installation.
Any thoughts appreciated.  Rex Ballard and Aragorn:  feel free to
write a step-by-step tutorial that runs for 100 pages and ages--I
promise to read all of it.  This time I'm serious--wolf, wolf--and no
I'm not just posing these questions to see if the thread grows to 100
replies.  In the last time we got to 99--cool.
Yes I can see the value of dual booting Linux:  you can lern Linux at
your own pace, if you are a WIndows user, and at the same time use
Linux to surf the net faster than with a LiveCD distro.  I realize you
cannot--absent a Virtual OS setup which Mike and Norm like--'hot swap'
between OSes on the fly.  I had NT and Redhat dual booted ages ago (I
used a utility called BootMagic, now discontinued, to help).  But it
is useful to dual boot for the reasons I just stated.
Thank you for your attention.  Let the flames begin...

Random info from surfing the net below...

Boot Magic ( v. 1.0 ) - complete package (discontinued)
Accepted  For a system that multi-boots different version...
     For a system that multi-boots different versions of Windows,there
is not a lot of value to a boot manager utility.    So long as you
install the different versions of Windows in the order they were
released, the Windows boot loader should take care of things.
     The only tricky thing with the Windows boot loader is setting the
default OS.
     The main value of a boot manager is when you are running different
styles of operating systems. Such as a system that dual boots Linux
and Windows. Or a true DOS OS and Windows.
     Chas
     Posted: 04/09/2006 @ 04:27 PM (PDT)
why do you need a boot manager.....just load the OSes....
separate partitions are ok, I prefer different drives for multibooting
only conceivable problem is boot.ini being rewritten -
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/323427/en-us
Free boot manager. Allows boot of up to 9 different operating systems
     http://www.softpedia.com/get/System/Boot-Manager-Disk/GAG-d.shtml
GAG description
free boot manager. Allows boot of up to 9 different operating systems
GAG is a Boot Manager application. It's loaded when the computer is
turned on and allows you to choose the operating system you want to
use.
Here are some key features of "GAG d":
� Allows boot of up to 9 different operating systems.
� It can boot operating systems installed in primary and extended
partitions on any available hard disk.
� Can be installed from nearly all operating systems.
� GAG doesn't need its own partition. It installs itself in thefirst
track of the hard disk, wich is reserved for these kinds of programs.
It can also be instaled on a floppy disk, without using the hard disk.
� It has a timer to boot a default operating system (selectableby the
user).
� The configuration menu can be protected with a password.
� The program works in graphic mode (needs a VGA or better graphic
card), and has a lot of icons.
� Hides the primary partitions which allows the user to have instaled
more than one DOS and/or Windows in the same hard disk.
� Allows a password to be put on each operating system, denyingaccess
to non-authorized people.
� Allows the boot manager text to be translated to all languages.
� Can exchange disk drives, allowing to boot from the second, third...
hard disk operating systems such as MS-DOS.
� Has the SafeBoot system, that allows to boot your hard disk even if
GAG is accidentally overwrited.
� Supports a great variety of keyboards (QWERTY, AZERTY, QWERTZand
DVORAK keyboards).
� Fully support for hard disks up to 4 terabytes (4096 gigabytes).
What's New in This Release: [ read full changelog ]

If you install XP first and then Mint, Mint will create Grub so you can
dual boot. Be sure and leave a partition for Mint when you install XP.
You may want to check out alt.os.linux.mint for support.

Thanks Alias. Grub then will popup after Mint is installed, when you
reboot? Is that the idea? Or do you have to fiddle with Grub to make
it popup when you reboot? And what do you do if so? (what are the
switches?) or is it self explanatory about the popup?

Also when you create an ext2 partition (I plan to use a WIndows tool
that does this), will Mint recognize the ext2 partition the first time
you slip the Mint DVD/CD in, and install itself there? I hope so--
that it doesn't overwrite NTFS (the XP format)!

RL
 
A

Alias

Against my better judgment, I decided maybe to dual boot Linux with XP
(XP being installed first). I found a tutorial using Ubuntu for Linux
on how to do this (http://apcmag.com/
how_to_dual_boot_windows_xp_and_linux_xp_installed_first.htm) that
tries to make it look so easy, but the problem is in the MBR which
sometimes gets corrupted. To solve this, I found a Windows freeware
program called GAGhttp://www.softpedia.com/get/System/Boot-Manager-Disk/GAG-d.shtml
In Linux you can use the dual boot manager Grub (?) I think.
I'm asking if this is a good idea, if anybody has had any problems,
and what utilities, like GAG or Grub, they use.
Target machine: Pentium 4, 50 GB HD (IDE)--just one drive, so I'll
have to partition it, 1 GB RAM, currently with Windows XP installed.
Linux OS: I think Mint. I downloaded Puppy Live CD also today, and
it's much smaller, because Mike Easter likes it for LiveCD surfing of
the net (it's faster). But now that I might go the dual boot route, I
think Mint might be more robust for a HD installation.
Any thoughts appreciated. Rex Ballard and Aragorn: feel free to
write a step-by-step tutorial that runs for 100 pages and ages--I
promise to read all of it. This time I'm serious--wolf, wolf--and no
I'm not just posing these questions to see if the thread grows to 100
replies. In the last time we got to 99--cool.
Yes I can see the value of dual booting Linux: you can lern Linux at
your own pace, if you are a WIndows user, and at the same time use
Linux to surf the net faster than with a LiveCD distro. I realize you
cannot--absent a Virtual OS setup which Mike and Norm like--'hot swap'
between OSes on the fly. I had NT and Redhat dual booted ages ago (I
used a utility called BootMagic, now discontinued, to help). But it
is useful to dual boot for the reasons I just stated.
Thank you for your attention. Let the flames begin...

Random info from surfing the net below...

Boot Magic ( v. 1.0 ) - complete package (discontinued)
Accepted For a system that multi-boots different version...
For a system that multi-boots different versions of Windows, there
is not a lot of value to a boot manager utility. So long as you
install the different versions of Windows in the order they were
released, the Windows boot loader should take care of things.
The only tricky thing with the Windows boot loader is setting the
default OS.
The main value of a boot manager is when you are running different
styles of operating systems. Such as a system that dual boots Linux
and Windows. Or a true DOS OS and Windows.
Chas
Posted: 04/09/2006 @ 04:27 PM (PDT)
why do you need a boot manager.....just load the OSes....
separate partitions are ok, I prefer different drives for multibooting
only conceivable problem is boot.ini being rewritten -
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/323427/en-us
Free boot manager. Allows boot of up to 9 different operating systems
http://www.softpedia.com/get/System/Boot-Manager-Disk/GAG-d.shtml
GAG description
free boot manager. Allows boot of up to 9 different operating systems
GAG is a Boot Manager application. It's loaded when the computer is
turned on and allows you to choose the operating system you want to
use.
Here are some key features of "GAG d":
� Allows boot of up to 9 different operating systems.
� It can boot operating systems installed in primary and extended
partitions on any available hard disk.
� Can be installed from nearly all operating systems.
� GAG doesn't need its own partition. It installs itself in the first
track of the hard disk, wich is reserved for these kinds of programs.
It can also be instaled on a floppy disk, without using the hard disk.
� It has a timer to boot a default operating system (selectable by the
user).
� The configuration menu can be protected with a password.
� The program works in graphic mode (needs a VGA or better graphic
card), and has a lot of icons.
� Hides the primary partitions which allows the user to have instaled
more than one DOS and/or Windows in the same hard disk.
� Allows a password to be put on each operating system, denying access
to non-authorized people.
� Allows the boot manager text to be translated to all languages.
� Can exchange disk drives, allowing to boot from the second, third...
hard disk operating systems such as MS-DOS.
� Has the SafeBoot system, that allows to boot your hard disk even if
GAG is accidentally overwrited.
� Supports a great variety of keyboards (QWERTY, AZERTY, QWERTZ and
DVORAK keyboards).
� Fully support for hard disks up to 4 terabytes (4096 gigabytes).
What's New in This Release: [ read full changelog ]

If you install XP first and then Mint, Mint will create Grub so you can
dual boot. Be sure and leave a partition for Mint when you install XP.
You may want to check out alt.os.linux.mint for support.

Thanks Alias. Grub then will popup after Mint is installed, when you
reboot? Is that the idea? Or do you have to fiddle with Grub to make
it popup when you reboot? And what do you do if so? (what are the
switches?) or is it self explanatory about the popup?

Also when you create an ext2 partition (I plan to use a WIndows tool
that does this), will Mint recognize the ext2 partition the first time
you slip the Mint DVD/CD in, and install itself there? I hope so--
that it doesn't overwrite NTFS (the XP format)!

RL

I didn't notice it was you, the troll. No more help from me, sorry.
 
T

The poster formerly known as 'The Poster Formerly

Against my better judgment, I decided maybe to dual boot Linux with XP
(XP being installed first). I found a tutorial using Ubuntu for Linux
on how to do this (http://apcmag.com/
how_to_dual_boot_windows_xp_and_linux_xp_installed_first.htm) that
tries to make it look so easy, but the problem is in the MBR which
sometimes gets corrupted. To solve this, I found a Windows freeware
program called GAG http://www.softpedia.com/get/System/Boot-Manager-Disk/GAG-d.shtml

In Linux you can use the dual boot manager Grub (?) I think.

I'm asking if this is a good idea, if anybody has had any problems,
and what utilities, like GAG or Grub, they use.

Target machine: Pentium 4, 50 GB HD (IDE)--just one drive, so I'll
have to partition it, 1 GB RAM, currently with Windows XP installed.
Linux OS: I think Mint. I downloaded Puppy Live CD also today, and
it's much smaller, because Mike Easter likes it for LiveCD surfing of
the net (it's faster). But now that I might go the dual boot route, I
think Mint might be more robust for a HD installation.

Yes I can see the value of dual booting Linux: you can lern Linux at
your own pace, if you are a WIndows user, and at the same time use


I use LILO and with fedora and have not had any recent problems.
 
R

RayLopez99

I didn't notice it was you, the troll. No more help from me, sorry.

You are sorry. And your help is worthless. After more research, I've
decided this is a very complicated problem. The most general solution
is found in the first link below, and you notice he uses FOUR (4)
partitions: the Windows NTFS, the Linux ext2 (that he upgrades to ext3
but you need to start with 2 first) then TWO additional partitions,
one being a FAT32 format for swapping info between Windows and Linux--
why? I think because if you want to, you can do this instead of
'emailing yourself' with the information you want exchanged between
Windows and Linux.

This is very hairy, very complex. I might just abandon this project.
Seriously.

RL

http://www.matthewjmiller.net/howtos/dual-boot-linux-and-windows/ (a
general HOWTO on dual booting XP and Linux-- note how many steps there
are--not the usual soft soap selling technique of the other HOWTOs)

http://www.ghacks.net/2008/12/15/how-to-dual-boot-linux-and-windows-xp/
(a dual boot HOWTO that uses the distro GParted Live CD to do the
heavy lifting--so he makes it look easy when it may not be, unless you
are locked into the GParted distro of Linux, which I never heard
of...I want MINT.)

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2319615,00.asp (a dual boot HOWTO
that uses the Asus Netbook, which has a proprietary setup in certain
areas, so it may not work on a more generic XP installation.)

Whew! Wow. This is dual boot? Complicated.
 
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A

Alias

You are sorry. And your help is worthless. After more research, I've
decided this is a very complicated problem. The most general solution
is found in the first link below, and you notice he uses FOUR (4)
partitions: the Windows NTFS, the Linux ext2 (that he upgrades to ext3
but you need to start with 2 first) then TWO additional partitions,
one being a FAT32 format for swapping info between Windows and Linux--
why? I think because if you want to, you can do this instead of
'emailing yourself' with the information you want exchanged between
Windows and Linux.

This is very hairy, very complex. I might just abandon this project.
Seriously.

RL

You don't know what the **** you're talking about. All of the above is
pure, unadulterated BULLSHIT. I can read NTFS from Linux just fine,
thank you very much. XP cannot see Linux and it doesn't matter one iota
if XP is in FAT32 or NTFS.

Now, why don't you just **** off and stop trolling with bullshit?
 
B

bbgruff

This is very hairy, very complex. I might just abandon this project.
Seriously.

Very wise.
I've read what you have been saying in this thread, and it's clear that you
are as clueless as I thought.

Don't do it.
Linux is not for you.
You are too thick.
It will all end in tears.
 
C

Chris Ahlstrom

Alias pulled this Usenet face plant:

Pay no attention the the scarecrow behind the curtain.

It's no one else's call on whether you want to try Linux, or not.
I can read NTFS from Linux just fine, thank you very much.

You can even write to it, these days.
 
A

Alias

As usual you are completely wrong.

XP *can* see Linux file systems with the very good ext ifs drivers.

XP alone cannot. Oops. Only fools would let any flavor of Windows see
Linux. Ya know, like YOU.
Hint : when calling people idiots and morons and telling them to "****
off" it#s a good idea not to come across as a clueless wanker yourself.

Hint: go **** yourself.
 
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P

Peter Köhlmann

Hadron said:
As usual you are completely wrong.

He is totally right.
Linux can see NTFS FS by default, on wintendo nothing useful happens
XP *can* see Linux file systems with the very good ext ifs drivers.

It can see it. And "very good" my ass.
It is a EXT2 driver, which can't use EXT3 features at all.
If you write through that driver by windows, it is FS-Check time the next time
you start linux

So your "very good" amounts to "will damage the FS"


And no, it can *not* work with EXT4 *at* *all* and that is the standard driver
on most distros for quite some time
Hint : when calling people idiots and morons and telling them to "****
off" it#s a good idea not to come across as a clueless wanker yourself.

And *again* Hadron Larry Snot Quark proves his utter idiocy

Do you even know *anything* at all about linux, Hadron Larry?
 
E

Ezekiel

You are sorry. And your help is worthless. After more research, I've
decided this is a very complicated problem. The most general solution
is found in the first link below, and you notice he uses FOUR (4)
partitions: the Windows NTFS, the Linux ext2


Then get a set of these which is similar to what I have...

http://images17.newegg.com/is/image/newegg/17-121-177-S02?$S640W$


You can buy just the tray/caddy for about $10/each. This will let you
completely swap out a drive in about 5 seconds and install whatever OS you
want with absolutely ZERO chance of your install damaging the other
partition.
 
G

GangGreene

Hadron said:
As usual you are completely wrong.

XP *can* see Linux file systems with the very good ext ifs drivers.

I dual boot Win-7 (64-bit) and Arch linux x86_64.

Win7 cannot see any of my linux filesystems as they are encrypted on top of
LVM. Oh that's right windows doesn't do LVM. Windows also doesn't do
bootable encrypted filesystems. It needs an open source project called
truecrypt do do so. I am also using JFS can windows read jfs? No....I
didn't think so.
 
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A

Alias

This is *extremely* interesting. You are a power user, yet you prefer
such a "physical" approach! Why is that Ezekiel? Don't trust grub
maybe?

RL

I don't use Grub either. I have Win XP on one hard drive, Ubuntu on
another and Mint on yet another. When there's an update for the kernel
or Grub, I disconnect all drives except the one I'm updating. My BIOS
allows me to hit F8 upon boot to get the choice as to which hard drive I
want to boot into if it isn't the default drive.
 
E

Ezekiel

It's not a matter of trusting or not trusting grub. It's just what works
better for me. I have several old drives from an old RAID array that I don't
use any more. These are 250-gigs each and this sort of arrangement lets me
boot any OS by simply sliding in the correct drive cartridge. I don't have
to worry about grub (or me) making a mistake and it just makes things a lot
easier for me. I did dual-boot at one time with my old setup and I just like
this a lot better.

I don't use Grub either. I have Win XP on one hard drive, Ubuntu on
another and Mint on yet another. When there's an update for the kernel or
Grub, I disconnect all drives except the one I'm updating. My BIOS allows
me to hit F8 upon boot to get the choice as to which hard drive I want to
boot into if it isn't the default drive.

This is the equivalent of disconnecting the drives except that you don't
need to mess with any cables. Any drive can be removed and substituted with
any other drive right from the front of the computer case. I actually have
two of these installed... one for the OS and the other for the large data
drive.
 
A

Alias

This is the equivalent of disconnecting the drives except that you don't
need to mess with any cables. Any drive can be removed and substituted with
any other drive right from the front of the computer case. I actually have
two of these installed... one for the OS and the other for the large data
drive.

I like your set up better and that's in my plans. In the meantime,
disconnecting SATA drives isn't what PATA drives used to be anyway ;-)
 
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A

Alias

What hell are you talking about?

You weren't expected to understand and you met all expectations with
flying colors.
Windows XP can and DOES see Linux file systems. OBVIOUSLY you need to
install the driver.
Need?


There are many reasons why you might want Windows to see Linux file
systems. Erm, its why the driver exists.
Chuckle.

Are you retarded or merely trolling?

Neither one.
 

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