Question has been asked before~but


D

drybones

These 78 year old brain cells are still not clear on the question of 32 bi
over 64:

When upgrading from WinXP Media 2005 with SP2 32 bit to the Vista
operating system the option of installing 32 bit or 64 bit is the back
biter.

I utilized my machine for internet capabilities, PC gaming (role-play
mostly) and
general word processing for most part.

It seems that 64 bit is the future and really can not afford one more
computer
upgrade including 64 bit programs unless there is a very high possibility of
the
64 bit taking off.

Which version of Vista Home Premium would be my best choice; the 32 bit or
64 bit for upgrading from WinXP Media 2005 with SP2 32 ?

Present machine is:
Dell XPS 600 with
Intel Pentium D 960 processor [3.6 GHz]
4 GB DDR2 SDRAM 667 MHz RAM
Dual NVIDIA 7800GTX video cards in SLI configuration
2 160GB NCQ Serial ATA Hard Drives
X-Fi PCI Sound Card

Thank you for your time in reading and hopefully replying.
drybones
 
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F

Frankster

Unless you have a compelling need to run 64-bit, I'd recommend 32-bit, due
to its better vendor support of applications and drivers. Drivers in
particular, because the 64-bit version is not tolerant of "un-singed"
drivers, which many vendors continue to distribute.

-Frank
 
A

Adam Albright

These 78 year old brain cells are still not clear on the question of 32 bi
over 64:

Look at it this way; a CPU running 64 bit is taking twice as big a
gulp when grabbing code compared to a 32 bit CPU. So of course it runs
faster, but better, not always, not yet anyway. For sure 64 bit
processing is the future, but that future for the most part is years
off yet. The catch 22 is unless you have 64 bit capable software that
takes full advantage of your 64 bit CPU, its like going to the local
grocery store driving a fancy Jag sports car. Doesn't make a lot of
sense to have all that horsepower and not really use it. Then there is
the issue of finding 64 bit drivers. Right now those can be as scarce
as hen's teeth, especially for Vista. So unless you have some very
specific task in mind, already have a good source for hardware and
know you won't have trouble finding the needed 64 bit drivers,
pointless for most people. We may me there by your 80th birthday!
 
S

Shane Nokes

That's only if he buys Ultimate.

He quite clearly stated he wants to use Home Premium.

Home Premium retail cases only include 32-bit, but you can order a 64-bit
DVD later if needed.


kirk jim said:
WHoops.. I meant to say >>

"buy retail version of VISTA it has 2 dvds"

sorry


kirk jim said:
Hello

if you buy retail version of XP it has 2 dvds, one for 32 bit and one for
64 bit.. you can use any of those 2 but not both at the same time of
course IF your computer is 64 bit capable. Im not sure about your CPU is
64 bit capable.. perhaps somene can tell us that.

I would suggest you keep away from 64 bit for the time being...

There is no real advantage since you have 4 gb or ram...

if you wanted 8 gb of ram then you would need 64 bit, because only a 64
bit OS can handle more than 4...


drybones said:
These 78 year old brain cells are still not clear on the question of 32
bi over 64:

When upgrading from WinXP Media 2005 with SP2 32 bit to the Vista
operating system the option of installing 32 bit or 64 bit is the back
biter.

I utilized my machine for internet capabilities, PC gaming (role-play
mostly) and
general word processing for most part.

It seems that 64 bit is the future and really can not afford one more
computer
upgrade including 64 bit programs unless there is a very high
possibility of the
64 bit taking off.

Which version of Vista Home Premium would be my best choice; the 32 bit
or
64 bit for upgrading from WinXP Media 2005 with SP2 32 ?

Present machine is:
Dell XPS 600 with
Intel Pentium D 960 processor [3.6 GHz]
4 GB DDR2 SDRAM 667 MHz RAM
Dual NVIDIA 7800GTX video cards in SLI configuration
2 160GB NCQ Serial ATA Hard Drives
X-Fi PCI Sound Card

Thank you for your time in reading and hopefully replying.
drybones
 
D

Darkelldar

Vista Home and Business come with the 32 bit DVD you can order the 64 bit
DVD from MS if you need or want it. Vista Ultimate comes with both 32 and 64
bit disks in the package.
Cost $13.00 for shipping got mine in a week.

kirk jim said:
WHoops.. I meant to say >>

"buy retail version of VISTA it has 2 dvds"

sorry


kirk jim said:
Hello

if you buy retail version of XP it has 2 dvds, one for 32 bit and one for
64 bit.. you can use any of those 2 but not both at the same time of
course IF your computer is 64 bit capable. Im not sure about your CPU is
64 bit capable.. perhaps somene can tell us that.

I would suggest you keep away from 64 bit for the time being...

There is no real advantage since you have 4 gb or ram...

if you wanted 8 gb of ram then you would need 64 bit, because only a 64
bit OS can handle more than 4...


drybones said:
These 78 year old brain cells are still not clear on the question of 32
bi over 64:

When upgrading from WinXP Media 2005 with SP2 32 bit to the Vista
operating system the option of installing 32 bit or 64 bit is the back
biter.

I utilized my machine for internet capabilities, PC gaming (role-play
mostly) and
general word processing for most part.

It seems that 64 bit is the future and really can not afford one more
computer
upgrade including 64 bit programs unless there is a very high
possibility of the
64 bit taking off.

Which version of Vista Home Premium would be my best choice; the 32 bit
or
64 bit for upgrading from WinXP Media 2005 with SP2 32 ?

Present machine is:
Dell XPS 600 with
Intel Pentium D 960 processor [3.6 GHz]
4 GB DDR2 SDRAM 667 MHz RAM
Dual NVIDIA 7800GTX video cards in SLI configuration
2 160GB NCQ Serial ATA Hard Drives
X-Fi PCI Sound Card

Thank you for your time in reading and hopefully replying.
drybones
 
K

kirk jim

Hello

if you buy retail version of XP it has 2 dvds, one for 32 bit and one for 64
bit.. you can use any of those 2 but not both at the same time of course IF
your computer is 64 bit capable. Im not sure about your CPU is 64 bit
capable.. perhaps somene can tell us that.

I would suggest you keep away from 64 bit for the time being...

There is no real advantage since you have 4 gb or ram...

if you wanted 8 gb of ram then you would need 64 bit, because only a 64 bit
OS can handle more than 4...
 
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G

Guest

Here again we here lies from idiots. As you don't understand windows perhaps
you shouldn't talk about it.

Now unusually, you are almost right. Your advice is overall good.

But XP can access a lot more memory than 4GB. It has several modes of
operating.

kirk jim said:
Hello

if you buy retail version of XP it has 2 dvds, one for 32 bit and one for
64 bit.. you can use any of those 2 but not both at the same time of
course IF your computer is 64 bit capable. Im not sure about your CPU is
64 bit capable.. perhaps somene can tell us that.

I would suggest you keep away from 64 bit for the time being...

There is no real advantage since you have 4 gb or ram...

if you wanted 8 gb of ram then you would need 64 bit, because only a 64
bit OS can handle more than 4...


drybones said:
These 78 year old brain cells are still not clear on the question of 32
bi over 64:

When upgrading from WinXP Media 2005 with SP2 32 bit to the Vista
operating system the option of installing 32 bit or 64 bit is the back
biter.

I utilized my machine for internet capabilities, PC gaming (role-play
mostly) and
general word processing for most part.

It seems that 64 bit is the future and really can not afford one more
computer
upgrade including 64 bit programs unless there is a very high possibility
of the
64 bit taking off.

Which version of Vista Home Premium would be my best choice; the 32 bit
or
64 bit for upgrading from WinXP Media 2005 with SP2 32 ?

Present machine is:
Dell XPS 600 with
Intel Pentium D 960 processor [3.6 GHz]
4 GB DDR2 SDRAM 667 MHz RAM
Dual NVIDIA 7800GTX video cards in SLI configuration
2 160GB NCQ Serial ATA Hard Drives
X-Fi PCI Sound Card

Thank you for your time in reading and hopefully replying.
drybones
 
K

kirk jim

WHoops.. I meant to say >>

"buy retail version of VISTA it has 2 dvds"

sorry


kirk jim said:
Hello

if you buy retail version of XP it has 2 dvds, one for 32 bit and one for
64 bit.. you can use any of those 2 but not both at the same time of
course IF your computer is 64 bit capable. Im not sure about your CPU is
64 bit capable.. perhaps somene can tell us that.

I would suggest you keep away from 64 bit for the time being...

There is no real advantage since you have 4 gb or ram...

if you wanted 8 gb of ram then you would need 64 bit, because only a 64
bit OS can handle more than 4...


drybones said:
These 78 year old brain cells are still not clear on the question of 32
bi over 64:

When upgrading from WinXP Media 2005 with SP2 32 bit to the Vista
operating system the option of installing 32 bit or 64 bit is the back
biter.

I utilized my machine for internet capabilities, PC gaming (role-play
mostly) and
general word processing for most part.

It seems that 64 bit is the future and really can not afford one more
computer
upgrade including 64 bit programs unless there is a very high possibility
of the
64 bit taking off.

Which version of Vista Home Premium would be my best choice; the 32 bit
or
64 bit for upgrading from WinXP Media 2005 with SP2 32 ?

Present machine is:
Dell XPS 600 with
Intel Pentium D 960 processor [3.6 GHz]
4 GB DDR2 SDRAM 667 MHz RAM
Dual NVIDIA 7800GTX video cards in SLI configuration
2 160GB NCQ Serial ATA Hard Drives
X-Fi PCI Sound Card

Thank you for your time in reading and hopefully replying.
drybones
 
J

John Barnett MVP

As it stands i would stick with 32 Bit. A vast majority of software isn't
even 64 bit compatable anyway. 64 bit may work faster, but it is still early
days.

--
John Barnett MVP
Associate Expert
Windows - Shell/User

Web: http://xphelpandsupport.mvps.org
Web: http://vistasupport.mvps.org

The information in this mail/post is supplied "as is". No warranty of any
kind, either expressed or implied, is made in relation to the accuracy,
reliability or content of this mail/post. The Author shall not be liable for
any direct, indirect, incidental or consequential damages arising out of the
use of, or inability to use, information or opinions expressed in this
mail/post..
 
G

Guest

Physical Address Extension
The Physical Address Extension (PAE) enables applications to address more
than 4 GB of physical memory. It is supported by Intel processors. The
following systems can use PAE to take advantage of physical memory beyond 4
GB:



Windows Server 2003, Enterprise Edition
Windows 2000 Datacenter Server
Windows 2000 Advanced Server
To enable PAE, use the /PAE switch in the Boot.ini file. To disable PAE, use
the /NOPAE switch.

With PAE enabled, the operating system moves from two-level linear address
translation to three-level address translation. The extra layer of
translation provides access to physical memory beyond 4 GB. Instead of a
linear address being split into three separate fields for indexing into
memory tables, it is split into four separate fields; a 2-bit field, two
9-bit fields, and a 12-bit field that corresponds to the page size
implemented by Intel Architecture (4 KB).


kirk jim said:
this has been discussed many times here and on the XP newsgroups.

I am welcome to new information that says that XP32bit can handle more
than 4gb ram. But if it cannot... then you are the idiot... :)


Here again we here lies from idiots. As you don't understand windows
perhaps you shouldn't talk about it.

Now unusually, you are almost right. Your advice is overall good.

But XP can access a lot more memory than 4GB. It has several modes of
operating.

kirk jim said:
Hello

if you buy retail version of XP it has 2 dvds, one for 32 bit and one
for 64 bit.. you can use any of those 2 but not both at the same time of
course IF your computer is 64 bit capable. Im not sure about your CPU is
64 bit capable.. perhaps somene can tell us that.

I would suggest you keep away from 64 bit for the time being...

There is no real advantage since you have 4 gb or ram...

if you wanted 8 gb of ram then you would need 64 bit, because only a 64
bit OS can handle more than 4...


These 78 year old brain cells are still not clear on the question of 32
bi over 64:

When upgrading from WinXP Media 2005 with SP2 32 bit to the Vista
operating system the option of installing 32 bit or 64 bit is the back
biter.

I utilized my machine for internet capabilities, PC gaming (role-play
mostly) and
general word processing for most part.

It seems that 64 bit is the future and really can not afford one more
computer
upgrade including 64 bit programs unless there is a very high
possibility of the
64 bit taking off.

Which version of Vista Home Premium would be my best choice; the 32 bit
or
64 bit for upgrading from WinXP Media 2005 with SP2 32 ?

Present machine is:
Dell XPS 600 with
Intel Pentium D 960 processor [3.6 GHz]
4 GB DDR2 SDRAM 667 MHz RAM
Dual NVIDIA 7800GTX video cards in SLI configuration
2 160GB NCQ Serial ATA Hard Drives
X-Fi PCI Sound Card

Thank you for your time in reading and hopefully replying.
drybones
 
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G

Guest

It uses more physical memory (virtual memory uses a lot of physical memory
to track it - PAE uses a hell of a lot of physical memory). Programs must be
written to use it. And criminal cartels prefer to extract maximun cash from
people. The memory modes are generally designed for server apps and are not
suitable for browsing the web and watching porn

I only posted one of the many memory modes..
kirk jim said:
Yes, I know this but this is not on XP, and not on vista 32bit either...
and not on the linux systems I have seen around...

If it was so simple why dont they do it for all computers..

if it is just a matter of a switch why not add that and add 16 gb of ram
on your 32 bit machine...

there must be something other than marketing here.. because linux is
free..
they have no advantage to not give this functionality to people.



Physical Address Extension
The Physical Address Extension (PAE) enables applications to address more
than 4 GB of physical memory. It is supported by Intel processors. The
following systems can use PAE to take advantage of physical memory beyond
4 GB:



Windows Server 2003, Enterprise Edition
Windows 2000 Datacenter Server
Windows 2000 Advanced Server
To enable PAE, use the /PAE switch in the Boot.ini file. To disable PAE,
use the /NOPAE switch.

With PAE enabled, the operating system moves from two-level linear
address translation to three-level address translation. The extra layer
of translation provides access to physical memory beyond 4 GB. Instead of
a linear address being split into three separate fields for indexing into
memory tables, it is split into four separate fields; a 2-bit field, two
9-bit fields, and a 12-bit field that corresponds to the page size
implemented by Intel Architecture (4 KB).


kirk jim said:
this has been discussed many times here and on the XP newsgroups.

I am welcome to new information that says that XP32bit can handle more
than 4gb ram. But if it cannot... then you are the idiot... :)


<.> wrote in message Here again we here lies from idiots. As you don't understand windows
perhaps you shouldn't talk about it.

Now unusually, you are almost right. Your advice is overall good.

But XP can access a lot more memory than 4GB. It has several modes of
operating.

Hello

if you buy retail version of XP it has 2 dvds, one for 32 bit and one
for 64 bit.. you can use any of those 2 but not both at the same time
of course IF your computer is 64 bit capable. Im not sure about your
CPU is 64 bit capable.. perhaps somene can tell us that.

I would suggest you keep away from 64 bit for the time being...

There is no real advantage since you have 4 gb or ram...

if you wanted 8 gb of ram then you would need 64 bit, because only a
64 bit OS can handle more than 4...


These 78 year old brain cells are still not clear on the question of
32 bi over 64:

When upgrading from WinXP Media 2005 with SP2 32 bit to the Vista
operating system the option of installing 32 bit or 64 bit is the
back biter.

I utilized my machine for internet capabilities, PC gaming (role-play
mostly) and
general word processing for most part.

It seems that 64 bit is the future and really can not afford one more
computer
upgrade including 64 bit programs unless there is a very high
possibility of the
64 bit taking off.

Which version of Vista Home Premium would be my best choice; the 32
bit or
64 bit for upgrading from WinXP Media 2005 with SP2 32 ?

Present machine is:
Dell XPS 600 with
Intel Pentium D 960 processor [3.6 GHz]
4 GB DDR2 SDRAM 667 MHz RAM
Dual NVIDIA 7800GTX video cards in SLI configuration
2 160GB NCQ Serial ATA Hard Drives
X-Fi PCI Sound Card

Thank you for your time in reading and hopefully replying.
drybones
 
K

kirk jim

this has been discussed many times here and on the XP newsgroups.

I am welcome to new information that says that XP32bit can handle more than
4gb ram. But if it cannot... then you are the idiot... :)


Here again we here lies from idiots. As you don't understand windows
perhaps you shouldn't talk about it.

Now unusually, you are almost right. Your advice is overall good.

But XP can access a lot more memory than 4GB. It has several modes of
operating.

kirk jim said:
Hello

if you buy retail version of XP it has 2 dvds, one for 32 bit and one for
64 bit.. you can use any of those 2 but not both at the same time of
course IF your computer is 64 bit capable. Im not sure about your CPU is
64 bit capable.. perhaps somene can tell us that.

I would suggest you keep away from 64 bit for the time being...

There is no real advantage since you have 4 gb or ram...

if you wanted 8 gb of ram then you would need 64 bit, because only a 64
bit OS can handle more than 4...


drybones said:
These 78 year old brain cells are still not clear on the question of 32
bi over 64:

When upgrading from WinXP Media 2005 with SP2 32 bit to the Vista
operating system the option of installing 32 bit or 64 bit is the back
biter.

I utilized my machine for internet capabilities, PC gaming (role-play
mostly) and
general word processing for most part.

It seems that 64 bit is the future and really can not afford one more
computer
upgrade including 64 bit programs unless there is a very high
possibility of the
64 bit taking off.

Which version of Vista Home Premium would be my best choice; the 32 bit
or
64 bit for upgrading from WinXP Media 2005 with SP2 32 ?

Present machine is:
Dell XPS 600 with
Intel Pentium D 960 processor [3.6 GHz]
4 GB DDR2 SDRAM 667 MHz RAM
Dual NVIDIA 7800GTX video cards in SLI configuration
2 160GB NCQ Serial ATA Hard Drives
X-Fi PCI Sound Card

Thank you for your time in reading and hopefully replying.
drybones
 
G

Guest

The program has to be written for the environment. Many morons here
reccomend setting the /3gb switch. Apart from the fact your hardware may not
work with the reduction in memory for the system (servers have simple, if
expensive, hardware requirements compared to a home user). But an
application needs to be written to support it. And only server apps are. So
setting it will reduce memory for the hardware and system to use and no
normal program can take advantage of it.

I punish people who talk trash. Because it is annoying to hear some idiot
talk about what they know nothing about. And it could prevent the computer
from booting. There is no advantage and only actual and (note AND not maybe)
potential disadvantage
kirk jim said:
The memory modes are generally designed for server apps and are not
suitable for browsing the web and watching porn


that is what I suspected... so there are other problems to this... you
cant use photoshop for example
and use all that ram...16gb

I was reading this page after you posted about the switches...
http://www.brianmadden.com/content/content.asp?ID=69

someone here posted this interesting post:


32 Bit CPU does not mean 32 bit addressing.
Posted by an Anonymous Visitor on 16 December 2004
Although it does not influence the rest of the article, the statement that
32 bit CPU means 32 addressbits is incorrect:

By definition, a 32-bit processor uses 32 bits to refer to the location of
each byte of memory

The 32 bit refers to the with of the CPU internal DATA bus and registers
and not to the width of the ADDRESS bus. This has always be the case. Go
back in history: the Z80 is an 8 bit CPU, but has 16 address bits (so 64
KB of memory). The 8086 is an 16 bits CPU, but has 20 addressbits (so 1 MB
of memory). The 80286 is also an 16 bit CPU, but with 24 addressbits (so
16 MB of memory).




It uses more physical memory (virtual memory uses a lot of physical
memory to track it - PAE uses a hell of a lot of physical memory).
Programs must be written to use it. And criminal cartels prefer to
extract maximun cash from people. The memory modes are generally designed
for server apps and are not suitable for browsing the web and watching
porn

I only posted one of the many memory modes..
kirk jim said:
Yes, I know this but this is not on XP, and not on vista 32bit either...
and not on the linux systems I have seen around...

If it was so simple why dont they do it for all computers..

if it is just a matter of a switch why not add that and add 16 gb of ram
on your 32 bit machine...

there must be something other than marketing here.. because linux is
free..
they have no advantage to not give this functionality to people.



<.> wrote in message Physical Address Extension
The Physical Address Extension (PAE) enables applications to address
more than 4 GB of physical memory. It is supported by Intel processors.
The following systems can use PAE to take advantage of physical memory
beyond 4 GB:



Windows Server 2003, Enterprise Edition
Windows 2000 Datacenter Server
Windows 2000 Advanced Server
To enable PAE, use the /PAE switch in the Boot.ini file. To disable
PAE, use the /NOPAE switch.

With PAE enabled, the operating system moves from two-level linear
address translation to three-level address translation. The extra layer
of translation provides access to physical memory beyond 4 GB. Instead
of a linear address being split into three separate fields for indexing
into memory tables, it is split into four separate fields; a 2-bit
field, two 9-bit fields, and a 12-bit field that corresponds to the
page size implemented by Intel Architecture (4 KB).


this has been discussed many times here and on the XP newsgroups.

I am welcome to new information that says that XP32bit can handle more
than 4gb ram. But if it cannot... then you are the idiot... :)


<.> wrote in message Here again we here lies from idiots. As you don't understand windows
perhaps you shouldn't talk about it.

Now unusually, you are almost right. Your advice is overall good.

But XP can access a lot more memory than 4GB. It has several modes of
operating.

Hello

if you buy retail version of XP it has 2 dvds, one for 32 bit and
one for 64 bit.. you can use any of those 2 but not both at the same
time of course IF your computer is 64 bit capable. Im not sure about
your CPU is 64 bit capable.. perhaps somene can tell us that.

I would suggest you keep away from 64 bit for the time being...

There is no real advantage since you have 4 gb or ram...

if you wanted 8 gb of ram then you would need 64 bit, because only a
64 bit OS can handle more than 4...


These 78 year old brain cells are still not clear on the question
of 32 bi over 64:

When upgrading from WinXP Media 2005 with SP2 32 bit to the Vista
operating system the option of installing 32 bit or 64 bit is the
back biter.

I utilized my machine for internet capabilities, PC gaming
(role-play mostly) and
general word processing for most part.

It seems that 64 bit is the future and really can not afford one
more computer
upgrade including 64 bit programs unless there is a very high
possibility of the
64 bit taking off.

Which version of Vista Home Premium would be my best choice; the 32
bit or
64 bit for upgrading from WinXP Media 2005 with SP2 32 ?

Present machine is:
Dell XPS 600 with
Intel Pentium D 960 processor [3.6 GHz]
4 GB DDR2 SDRAM 667 MHz RAM
Dual NVIDIA 7800GTX video cards in SLI configuration
2 160GB NCQ Serial ATA Hard Drives
X-Fi PCI Sound Card

Thank you for your time in reading and hopefully replying.
drybones
 
K

kirk jim

Yes, I know this but this is not on XP, and not on vista 32bit either...
and not on the linux systems I have seen around...

If it was so simple why dont they do it for all computers..

if it is just a matter of a switch why not add that and add 16 gb of ram
on your 32 bit machine...

there must be something other than marketing here.. because linux is free..
they have no advantage to not give this functionality to people.



Physical Address Extension
The Physical Address Extension (PAE) enables applications to address more
than 4 GB of physical memory. It is supported by Intel processors. The
following systems can use PAE to take advantage of physical memory beyond
4 GB:



Windows Server 2003, Enterprise Edition
Windows 2000 Datacenter Server
Windows 2000 Advanced Server
To enable PAE, use the /PAE switch in the Boot.ini file. To disable PAE,
use the /NOPAE switch.

With PAE enabled, the operating system moves from two-level linear address
translation to three-level address translation. The extra layer of
translation provides access to physical memory beyond 4 GB. Instead of a
linear address being split into three separate fields for indexing into
memory tables, it is split into four separate fields; a 2-bit field, two
9-bit fields, and a 12-bit field that corresponds to the page size
implemented by Intel Architecture (4 KB).


kirk jim said:
this has been discussed many times here and on the XP newsgroups.

I am welcome to new information that says that XP32bit can handle more
than 4gb ram. But if it cannot... then you are the idiot... :)


Here again we here lies from idiots. As you don't understand windows
perhaps you shouldn't talk about it.

Now unusually, you are almost right. Your advice is overall good.

But XP can access a lot more memory than 4GB. It has several modes of
operating.

Hello

if you buy retail version of XP it has 2 dvds, one for 32 bit and one
for 64 bit.. you can use any of those 2 but not both at the same time
of course IF your computer is 64 bit capable. Im not sure about your
CPU is 64 bit capable.. perhaps somene can tell us that.

I would suggest you keep away from 64 bit for the time being...

There is no real advantage since you have 4 gb or ram...

if you wanted 8 gb of ram then you would need 64 bit, because only a 64
bit OS can handle more than 4...


These 78 year old brain cells are still not clear on the question of
32 bi over 64:

When upgrading from WinXP Media 2005 with SP2 32 bit to the Vista
operating system the option of installing 32 bit or 64 bit is the back
biter.

I utilized my machine for internet capabilities, PC gaming (role-play
mostly) and
general word processing for most part.

It seems that 64 bit is the future and really can not afford one more
computer
upgrade including 64 bit programs unless there is a very high
possibility of the
64 bit taking off.

Which version of Vista Home Premium would be my best choice; the 32
bit or
64 bit for upgrading from WinXP Media 2005 with SP2 32 ?

Present machine is:
Dell XPS 600 with
Intel Pentium D 960 processor [3.6 GHz]
4 GB DDR2 SDRAM 667 MHz RAM
Dual NVIDIA 7800GTX video cards in SLI configuration
2 160GB NCQ Serial ATA Hard Drives
X-Fi PCI Sound Card

Thank you for your time in reading and hopefully replying.
drybones
 
D

drybones

Excellent reply and thank you for response.

drybones


Frankster said:
Unless you have a compelling need to run 64-bit, I'd recommend 32-bit, due
to its better vendor support of applications and drivers. Drivers in
particular, because the 64-bit version is not tolerant of "un-singed"
drivers, which many vendors continue to distribute.

-Frank

drybones said:
These 78 year old brain cells are still not clear on the question of 32
bi over 64:

When upgrading from WinXP Media 2005 with SP2 32 bit to the Vista
operating system the option of installing 32 bit or 64 bit is the back
biter.

I utilized my machine for internet capabilities, PC gaming (role-play
mostly) and
general word processing for most part.

It seems that 64 bit is the future and really can not afford one more
computer
upgrade including 64 bit programs unless there is a very high possibility
of the
64 bit taking off.

Which version of Vista Home Premium would be my best choice; the 32 bit
or
64 bit for upgrading from WinXP Media 2005 with SP2 32 ?

Present machine is:
Dell XPS 600 with
Intel Pentium D 960 processor [3.6 GHz]
4 GB DDR2 SDRAM 667 MHz RAM
Dual NVIDIA 7800GTX video cards in SLI configuration
2 160GB NCQ Serial ATA Hard Drives
X-Fi PCI Sound Card

Thank you for your time in reading and hopefully replying.
drybones
 
Ad

Advertisements

K

kirk jim

The memory modes are generally designed for server apps and are not
suitable for browsing the web and watching porn


that is what I suspected... so there are other problems to this... you cant
use photoshop for example
and use all that ram...16gb

I was reading this page after you posted about the switches...
http://www.brianmadden.com/content/content.asp?ID=69

someone here posted this interesting post:


32 Bit CPU does not mean 32 bit addressing.
Posted by an Anonymous Visitor on 16 December 2004
Although it does not influence the rest of the article, the statement that
32 bit CPU means 32 addressbits is incorrect:

By definition, a 32-bit processor uses 32 bits to refer to the location of
each byte of memory

The 32 bit refers to the with of the CPU internal DATA bus and registers and
not to the width of the ADDRESS bus. This has always be the case. Go back in
history: the Z80 is an 8 bit CPU, but has 16 address bits (so 64 KB of
memory). The 8086 is an 16 bits CPU, but has 20 addressbits (so 1 MB of
memory). The 80286 is also an 16 bit CPU, but with 24 addressbits (so 16 MB
of memory).




It uses more physical memory (virtual memory uses a lot of physical memory
to track it - PAE uses a hell of a lot of physical memory). Programs must
be written to use it. And criminal cartels prefer to extract maximun cash
from people. The memory modes are generally designed for server apps and
are not suitable for browsing the web and watching porn

I only posted one of the many memory modes..
kirk jim said:
Yes, I know this but this is not on XP, and not on vista 32bit either...
and not on the linux systems I have seen around...

If it was so simple why dont they do it for all computers..

if it is just a matter of a switch why not add that and add 16 gb of ram
on your 32 bit machine...

there must be something other than marketing here.. because linux is
free..
they have no advantage to not give this functionality to people.



Physical Address Extension
The Physical Address Extension (PAE) enables applications to address
more than 4 GB of physical memory. It is supported by Intel processors.
The following systems can use PAE to take advantage of physical memory
beyond 4 GB:



Windows Server 2003, Enterprise Edition
Windows 2000 Datacenter Server
Windows 2000 Advanced Server
To enable PAE, use the /PAE switch in the Boot.ini file. To disable PAE,
use the /NOPAE switch.

With PAE enabled, the operating system moves from two-level linear
address translation to three-level address translation. The extra layer
of translation provides access to physical memory beyond 4 GB. Instead
of a linear address being split into three separate fields for indexing
into memory tables, it is split into four separate fields; a 2-bit
field, two 9-bit fields, and a 12-bit field that corresponds to the page
size implemented by Intel Architecture (4 KB).


this has been discussed many times here and on the XP newsgroups.

I am welcome to new information that says that XP32bit can handle more
than 4gb ram. But if it cannot... then you are the idiot... :)


<.> wrote in message Here again we here lies from idiots. As you don't understand windows
perhaps you shouldn't talk about it.

Now unusually, you are almost right. Your advice is overall good.

But XP can access a lot more memory than 4GB. It has several modes of
operating.

Hello

if you buy retail version of XP it has 2 dvds, one for 32 bit and one
for 64 bit.. you can use any of those 2 but not both at the same time
of course IF your computer is 64 bit capable. Im not sure about your
CPU is 64 bit capable.. perhaps somene can tell us that.

I would suggest you keep away from 64 bit for the time being...

There is no real advantage since you have 4 gb or ram...

if you wanted 8 gb of ram then you would need 64 bit, because only a
64 bit OS can handle more than 4...


These 78 year old brain cells are still not clear on the question of
32 bi over 64:

When upgrading from WinXP Media 2005 with SP2 32 bit to the Vista
operating system the option of installing 32 bit or 64 bit is the
back biter.

I utilized my machine for internet capabilities, PC gaming
(role-play mostly) and
general word processing for most part.

It seems that 64 bit is the future and really can not afford one
more computer
upgrade including 64 bit programs unless there is a very high
possibility of the
64 bit taking off.

Which version of Vista Home Premium would be my best choice; the 32
bit or
64 bit for upgrading from WinXP Media 2005 with SP2 32 ?

Present machine is:
Dell XPS 600 with
Intel Pentium D 960 processor [3.6 GHz]
4 GB DDR2 SDRAM 667 MHz RAM
Dual NVIDIA 7800GTX video cards in SLI configuration
2 160GB NCQ Serial ATA Hard Drives
X-Fi PCI Sound Card

Thank you for your time in reading and hopefully replying.
drybones
 
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D

drybones

Thanks, Richard Harper.

Have no idea where to get 64 bit drivers let alone a bloody NVIDIA
Vista driver <grin>

Will stick with 32 bit after reading the many nicely put replies.

Drybones

Richard G. Harper said:
Unless you can be 100% sure you can get 64-bit drivers for every device
you have, including motherboard, printers, multimedia, etc. then you
should stick with 32-bit Vista.

--
Richard G. Harper [MVP Shell/User] (e-mail address removed)
* NEW! Catch my blog ... http://msmvps.com/blogs/rgharper/
* PLEASE post all messages and replies in the newsgroups
* The Website - http://rgharper.mvps.org/
* HELP us help YOU ... http://www.dts-l.org/goodpost.htm


drybones said:
These 78 year old brain cells are still not clear on the question of 32
bi over 64:

When upgrading from WinXP Media 2005 with SP2 32 bit to the Vista
operating system the option of installing 32 bit or 64 bit is the back
biter.

I utilized my machine for internet capabilities, PC gaming (role-play
mostly) and
general word processing for most part.

It seems that 64 bit is the future and really can not afford one more
computer
upgrade including 64 bit programs unless there is a very high possibility
of the
64 bit taking off.

Which version of Vista Home Premium would be my best choice; the 32 bit
or
64 bit for upgrading from WinXP Media 2005 with SP2 32 ?

Present machine is:
Dell XPS 600 with
Intel Pentium D 960 processor [3.6 GHz]
4 GB DDR2 SDRAM 667 MHz RAM
Dual NVIDIA 7800GTX video cards in SLI configuration
2 160GB NCQ Serial ATA Hard Drives
X-Fi PCI Sound Card

Thank you for your time in reading and hopefully replying.
drybones
 

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