New battery in wireless mouse


J

Jax

I put a new battery in my wireless mouse and although it shouldn't
make any difference it seemed to make the it more responsive and
focused. Is there some reason this would happen?
 
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G

GlowingBlueMist

I put a new battery in my wireless mouse and although it shouldn't
make any difference it seemed to make the it more responsive and
focused. Is there some reason this would happen?
Most likely just knocked some dust or dirt off the optical sensor.
 
F

Flasherly

I put a new battery in my wireless mouse and although it shouldn't
make any difference it seemed to make the it more responsive and
focused. Is there some reason this would happen?

It's not a logitec
It's not wear on the bones in your wrist
It's not that your eyes need glasses
It's not a $300 gaming mouse
 
J

John Doe

Jax said:
I put a new battery in my wireless mouse and although it
shouldn't make any difference it seemed to make the it more
responsive and focused. Is there some reason this would happen?

No. More likely you just knocked some dust around.

By some canned air and give it some puffs every once in a while.
 
M

Michael Black

I put a new battery in my wireless mouse and although it shouldn't
make any difference it seemed to make the it more responsive and
focused. Is there some reason this would happen?
We live with things until we finally do something about it, and then
suddenly it looks so much better.

I'd put off changing the ribbon in my typewriter, but the minute I put in
a new one, I could see how much better it was. The old one lost it's
potency over a long time, so I slowly adjusted. I couldn't tell how bad
it had really gotten, until I saw the new ribbon in place.

I notice the same thing with remotes, over a long period it gets fussier
and fussier, until I finally have to do something, which is to change the
battery. And there's a dramatic improvement. That's because it is back
to full operation, while I lived with the slow decay over a long time.

If the wireless connection between the mouse and the computer was decaying
because the battery was getting weak, the responsiveness might go down
because it was spending time repeating itself to get the information out
(I have no idea of what's in the wireless link from a mouse, or if it is
two-way so the computer can tell it to repeat). Or if the battery got
really ow, it might start affecting operation.

Best to replace the batteries earlier.

Michael
 
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J

Jax

We live with things until we finally do something about it, and
then suddenly it looks so much better.

I'd put off changing the ribbon in my typewriter, but the minute I
put in a new one, I could see how much better it was. The old one
lost it's potency over a long time, so I slowly adjusted. I
couldn't tell how bad it had really gotten, until I saw the new
ribbon in place.

I notice the same thing with remotes, over a long period it gets
fussier and fussier, until I finally have to do something, which
is to change the battery. And there's a dramatic improvement.
That's because it is back to full operation, while I lived with
the slow decay over a long time.

If the wireless connection between the mouse and the computer was
decaying because the battery was getting weak, the responsiveness
might go down because it was spending time repeating itself to get
the information out (I have no idea of what's in the wireless link
from a mouse, or if it is two-way so the computer can tell it to
repeat). Or if the battery got really ow, it might start
affecting operation.

Best to replace the batteries earlier.

Michael

Mivchael you need to get with the times if you're still using an old
fashioned typewriter. Give it to the grand kids and get yourself a
decent HP Laser Jet.
 
F

Flasherly

You're right, Flashy.

You should be more like me, then, and use a Logitech Trackman Marble;-
apparently I just break (the delicate programmable touch sensors) and
have to go out and keep repurchasing them for new units. No real
issues, otherwise, than being on my third unit since I first taught
myself to be a southpaw trackball user (more intuitive to regain the
key-to-hand placement than a right-handed mouse operand). Logitech
might advertise: Once you've used one, damned fresh batteries just
won't do anymore. It's the cheapest USB unit they make, I found on
sale at Best Buy last week for $20;- the RF/IR in the same-unit make
is a third or more expensive.

I'm fine, though, just peachy, with a damned good, convential
battery-operated wireless mouse on my other computer. Also a
Logitech, but only so long as I don't have to type or actually do much
else other than what multimedia comuters demand. It's so very
classic: I've truly a glass coffee table it will, besides, work from
upon.

And I tried like hell, honestly, I really did, not to buy from that
BestBuy sale on a Logitech - tried every angle I could to justify
changing and buy a Kensington trackball, instead.
 
P

PAS

Flasherly said:
You should be more like me, then, and use a Logitech Trackman Marble;-
apparently I just break (the delicate programmable touch sensors) and
have to go out and keep repurchasing them for new units. No real
issues, otherwise, than being on my third unit since I first taught
myself to be a southpaw trackball user (more intuitive to regain the
key-to-hand placement than a right-handed mouse operand). Logitech
might advertise: Once you've used one, damned fresh batteries just
won't do anymore. It's the cheapest USB unit they make, I found on
sale at Best Buy last week for $20;- the RF/IR in the same-unit make
is a third or more expensive.

I'm fine, though, just peachy, with a damned good, convential
battery-operated wireless mouse on my other computer. Also a
Logitech, but only so long as I don't have to type or actually do much
else other than what multimedia comuters demand. It's so very
classic: I've truly a glass coffee table it will, besides, work from
upon.

And I tried like hell, honestly, I really did, not to buy from that
BestBuy sale on a Logitech - tried every angle I could to justify
changing and buy a Kensington trackball, instead.

I've been using trackballs for about 18 years now. At one time, I had
the Logitech Cordless Trackman Opical, and excellent mouse. However,
after that one bit the dust after years of heavy use, I replaced it with
a Kensington Slimblade. By far, it's the best trackball I've ever used.
 
C

Charlie Hoffpauir

I've been using trackballs for about 18 years now. At one time, I had
the Logitech Cordless Trackman Opical, and excellent mouse. However,
after that one bit the dust after years of heavy use, I replaced it with
a Kensington Slimblade. By far, it's the best trackball I've ever used.

GASP!

I just Googled it and price runs from $93.998 to 124.95!

It certainly ought to be good.
 
F

Flasherly

I've been using trackballs for about 18 years now. At one time, I had
the Logitech Cordless Trackman Opical, and excellent mouse. However,
after that one bit the dust after years of heavy use, I replaced it with
a Kensington Slimblade. By far, it's the best trackball I've ever used.

And an amen for the man.

That's what I was looking at, rather ended up there -- for effectively
matching the functionality I need. A $30 or $50 Kensington just
wasn't happening after a hard look -- oh, no, best believe it wasn't
long before a $100 SlimBlade did catch my attention.

(Also needed to know precisely what options were available for those
four buttons in the way of macro assignments, which I did not or quite
so easily ascertain. Native Windows hotkeys, things such as "switch
to last task." It's actually three on a Logitech, at least for me:
those two smaller buttons superimposed on the larger - for a "switch
hitting" lefty, such as myself, the small left button just is not, at
all, conducive for deft usage. I wanted to tear it apart and swap out
the smallest microswitches, but, alas - Logitech is getting pretty
good at pressing together plastic parts, it would appear, for impeding
such an attempt.)

Tell you, too, I will spend over $50 on a keyboard, more -- I've
already done that before, $100 for the best of keyboards. Just never
that much on a mouse. As for exactly why, I'd be a little dark on the
insides and stuck to say. (Probably because I'm still typing on this
one - a $59 Focus keyboard from after when I wore out a $100
Northgate/Omnikey, and Focus bought out Omnikey. Most gamers with
their "colored - brown/blue/red" tactile keyswitchesd wouldn't be as
likely to recognize those names.)

Good to see someone who does know a quality item, though. Apart from
having it jump up and bite them on the ass. . . .After 3 Trackman
Marbles, (god, hope I'm not mistaken about that, and it's not already
four replacements), I'm halfway there -- as it is, doing it not so
much my way anymore, but the hard way -- Logitech's Way.
 
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P

PAS

Charlie Hoffpauir said:
GASP!

I just Googled it and price runs from $93.998 to 124.95!

It certainly ought to be good.

Some of Kensington's trackballs have always been expensive. The first
one I got was about 19 years ago, it was the "Expert Mouse":

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/96/Trackball-Kensington-ExpertMouse5.jpg

It cost $100.00 back then and it still works. The SlimBlade I have cost
me $55.00 from a small online seller, others were selling it for around
$100.00. I've not seen it priced lower than $100.00 since I bought it.
The best feature of these Kensington's is the large and somewhat heavy
trackball that they use. It looks to be about the size of a billiard
ball.
 

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