Moving from SCSI Raid array to internal IDE disk


B

BertieBigBollox

Got a server that, at the moment, runs from hardware RAID array which
basically presents as a 36GB logical drive. This is then partitioned
into C, D and E (with windows 2000 on C).

We want to get rid of the RAID and just use a single internal 40Gb
drive.

Tried using Ghost and it backs up the RAID disks no problem, and seems
to install on the new internal disk.

Trouble is it fails to boot with UNACCESSIBLE_BOOT_DEVICE. I assume
this because the boot disk is now totally different?

Is there any way to fix this? Would editing boot.ini or using bootcfg
(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/291980) sort this out?

Or maybe use Acronis true image with universal restore because I know
this will restore to different hardware (unlike ghost)?
 
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P

Pegasus [MVP]

Got a server that, at the moment, runs from hardware RAID array which
basically presents as a 36GB logical drive. This is then partitioned
into C, D and E (with windows 2000 on C).

We want to get rid of the RAID and just use a single internal 40Gb
drive.

Tried using Ghost and it backs up the RAID disks no problem, and seems
to install on the new internal disk.

Trouble is it fails to boot with UNACCESSIBLE_BOOT_DEVICE. I assume
this because the boot disk is now totally different?

Is there any way to fix this? Would editing boot.ini or using bootcfg
(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/291980) sort this out?

Or maybe use Acronis true image with universal restore because I know
this will restore to different hardware (unlike ghost)?

Windows is probably still looking for the SCSI RAID array driver. I would do
this to make it use an IDE controller.
1. Create or obtain a Bart PE boot CD.
2. Test the Bart CD. It must give you full access to the Windows System
partition.
3. Back up the System hive of the registry.
4. Boot the machine with the Bart CD and check if you can see both the
System hive and its backup copy.
5. Working through the Control Panel / System / Device Manager, change the
IDE ATA/ATAPI Controller from whatever it is to the Standard Dual Channel
PCI/IDE Controller.
6. Create your clone disk.
7. Disconnect the SCSI RAID controller and boot the machine with the IDE
disk.
8. If this fails, restore the original System hive from its backup copy,
using the Bart boot CD.

By the way, I think it is short-sighted to use a 40 GByte IDE disk for your
server. Use a 150 or 200 GByte disk to give you some elbow room! Make the
System partition 20 GBytes and use the rest for your data.
 
B

BertieBigBollox

Windows is probably still looking for the SCSI RAID array driver. I woulddo
this to make it use an IDE controller.
1. Create or obtain a Bart PE boot CD.
2. Test the Bart CD. It must give you full access to the Windows System
partition.
3. Back up the System hive of the registry.
4. Boot the machine with the Bart CD and check if you can see both the
System hive and its backup copy.
5. Working through the Control Panel / System / Device Manager, change the
IDE ATA/ATAPI Controller from whatever it is to the Standard Dual Channel
PCI/IDE Controller.
6. Create your clone disk.
7. Disconnect the SCSI RAID controller and boot the machine with the IDE
disk.
8. If this fails, restore the original System hive from its backup copy,
using the Bart boot CD.

By the way, I think it is short-sighted to use a 40 GByte IDE disk for your
server. Use a 150 or 200 GByte disk to give you some elbow room! Make the
System partition 20 GBytes and use the rest for your data.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -

Couldnt I get windows to look for the IDE disk using bootcfg?

BTW. Its actually a server PCI card with a 2.5" onboard drive hence
the reason for only 40gb.
 
D

Desk Rabbit

Got a server that, at the moment, runs from hardware RAID array which
basically presents as a 36GB logical drive. This is then partitioned
into C, D and E (with windows 2000 on C).

We want to get rid of the RAID and just use a single internal 40Gb
drive.

Tried using Ghost and it backs up the RAID disks no problem, and seems
to install on the new internal disk.

Trouble is it fails to boot with UNACCESSIBLE_BOOT_DEVICE. I assume
this because the boot disk is now totally different?

Is there any way to fix this? Would editing boot.ini or using bootcfg
(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/291980) sort this out?

Or maybe use Acronis true image with universal restore because I know
this will restore to different hardware (unlike ghost)?

Putting aside the fact that running a server on a single drive is a bad
idea (For bad read "a really stupid and dumb thing to do"), googling for
the correct error message will bring forth any number of solutions for
this very common question.

This for example:- http://www.motherboard.windowsreinstall.com/problems.htm
 
B

BertieBigBollox

Putting aside the fact that running a server on a single drive is a bad
idea (For bad read "a really stupid and dumb thing to do"), googling for
the correct error message will bring forth any number  of solutions for
this very common question.

This for example:-http://www.motherboard.windowsreinstall.com/problems.htm- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -

OK. It might run Windows 2000 server but its not a server as such. Its
a single board PC in a chassis of 6 of them, that runs windows 2000
and an application.
 
S

Sid Elbow

Tried using Ghost and it backs up the RAID disks no problem, and seems
to install on the new internal disk.

Trouble is it fails to boot with UNACCESSIBLE_BOOT_DEVICE. I assume
this because the boot disk is now totally different?


Assuming the hardware is in order (correct drive jumpering, good cables,
drive recognised properly in the BIOS ....

If you restored to a fresh (unpartitioned) drive, Ghost won't
automatically make any partition it creates it active (bootable). Check
with FDisk, Partition Magic or whatever partitioning program you have to
see if that's the case and make it bootable.

If that works and the partition then boots, you may yet have some
problems with the Windows installation if it has been set up for the
raid hardware.
 
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S

Sid Elbow

That's not it. K-man is right

It was my assumption the message was coming from the initial (BIOS)
boot. But If it's coming from the Windows boot, then yes, I agree.
 
P

Pegasus [MVP]

Windows is probably still looking for the SCSI RAID array driver. I would
do
this to make it use an IDE controller.
1. Create or obtain a Bart PE boot CD.
2. Test the Bart CD. It must give you full access to the Windows System
partition.
3. Back up the System hive of the registry.
4. Boot the machine with the Bart CD and check if you can see both the
System hive and its backup copy.
5. Working through the Control Panel / System / Device Manager, change the
IDE ATA/ATAPI Controller from whatever it is to the Standard Dual Channel
PCI/IDE Controller.
6. Create your clone disk.
7. Disconnect the SCSI RAID controller and boot the machine with the IDE
disk.
8. If this fails, restore the original System hive from its backup copy,
using the Bart boot CD.

By the way, I think it is short-sighted to use a 40 GByte IDE disk for
your
server. Use a 150 or 200 GByte disk to give you some elbow room! Make the
System partition 20 GBytes and use the rest for your data.- Hide quoted
text -

- Show quoted text -

Couldnt I get windows to look for the IDE disk using bootcfg?

===============

Acronis TrueImage with Universal Restore will cause this to happen - at a
price.
 
J

John Holmes

(e-mail address removed) "contributed" in 24hoursupport.helpdesk:
OK. It might run Windows 2000 server but its not a server as such. Its
a single board PC in a chassis of 6 of them, that runs windows 2000
and an application.

Do you even know what a "server" is supposed to do?
 
D

Desk Rabbit

OK. It might run Windows 2000 server but its not a server as such. Its
a single board PC in a chassis of 6 of them, that runs windows 2000
and an application.

I can only assume then that this is not a critical application and when
this single disk dies you can cope with the downtime required for
obtaining a replacement drive and restoring the O/S & data.
 
B

BertieBigBollox

Do you even know what a "server" is supposed to do?


Ho Hum. Cant go into details because of the nature of the application.
But its a specifically built chassis running several PC 'cards'
running windows 2000 server and running specific custom applications.
 
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D

Desk Rabbit

John said:
(e-mail address removed) "contributed" in 24hoursupport.helpdesk:


Do you even know what a "server" is supposed to do?
IMHO it is evident from the fact that the question was even asked in the
first place that this computing stuff is new to him.
 
B

BertieBigBollox

IMHO it is evident from the fact that the question was even asked in the
first place that this computing stuff is new to him.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -

Oh dear. Someone thinks they know everything here...
 
B

BertieBigBollox

I don't know everything but it's pretty obvious that I know a darn sight
more than you do.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -

Not going to argue because its pointless and childish.
 
B

BertieBigBollox

I don't know everything but it's pretty obvious that I know a darn sight
more than you do.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -

But my willy's bigger than yours !!!! LOL. ;-0
 
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