More PowerPoint Video Questions


G

Guest

I know how to fix this issue but its a goofy work around...

I run PowerPoint on laptops pretty much all the time. I would prefer
desktops but for travel its just not a good idea to take a tower...

So embedded video... How come PowerPoint displays a black overlay on some
videos (when using both local LCD and external)? Doesnt seem to matter the
format(codec) or length... I have found no real rhyme or reason to when/why
this happens but it really freaks out my clients...

I am used to it and I just make sure that my Primary display is the
external, or I run through a VGA to RGBHV interface and shutdown my local LCD
and use just the vga loop out on the box to feed a external monitor, sending
the RGB signal to the graphic screen switch...

Is there a way to prevent having to do these work arounds? Not that its
really an issue I would just love to have a real, concise answer for my
clients and none of the video engineers I talk to are computer nuts! lol...
good thing too keeps me employed!
 
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Advertisements

G

Guest

ok, poor choice of words with "embedded" but that is the generic term used
for video in powerpoint around my clients, etc.

by black over lay I mean exactly the black box on the projector... The
provided link is all informantion I already know... as I explained in my
original post...

I am a driver/update nut and everything I use is updated to the fullest
extent everytime I leave to op a show.

The question was: Why. I need to tell my clients why. I know how to fix it,
well, I know how to make it work the way I need to... but they want to know
WHY it happens... at this point they no longer care that I can fix it, they
just care that I can't give them a better answer then "I dont know why"... I
make speculations but it just never seems to cut it.

Thanks for the response and the link. It may help someone, but I already
knew all that and more...

Echo S said:
First, the video isn't embedded, it's linked.

Second, not sure what exactly you mean by a "black overlay," but see this:
Videos play correctly on computer but not on projector (black box)
http://www.rdpslides.com/pptfaq/FAQ00467.htm

--
Echo [MS PPT MVP] http://www.echosvoice.com
Fixing PowerPoint Annoyances http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/powerpointannoy/
How to Prevent PowerPoint Overload (March 23 webcast)
http://tinyurl.com/bp2h8


Brian Lynn said:
I know how to fix this issue but its a goofy work around...

I run PowerPoint on laptops pretty much all the time. I would prefer
desktops but for travel its just not a good idea to take a tower...

So embedded video... How come PowerPoint displays a black overlay on some
videos (when using both local LCD and external)? Doesnt seem to matter the
format(codec) or length... I have found no real rhyme or reason to
when/why
this happens but it really freaks out my clients...

I am used to it and I just make sure that my Primary display is the
external, or I run through a VGA to RGBHV interface and shutdown my local
LCD
and use just the vga loop out on the box to feed a external monitor,
sending
the RGB signal to the graphic screen switch...

Is there a way to prevent having to do these work arounds? Not that its
really an issue I would just love to have a real, concise answer for my
clients and none of the video engineers I talk to are computer nuts!
lol...
good thing too keeps me employed!
 
A

Austin Myers

Let's see if I can shed some light on it.

When you insert a video into PPT you are creating a placeholder. Normally
this placeholder is populated by the first key frame of the video. (PPT
does it.) There is NO movie there, just an image of the first key frame.

As I am certain you are aware, some videos do not have any key frames.
(Depends how it was encoded) or the first key frame is more than a second or
so into the video. This can also happen if the first few frames are "B"
frames. If PPT can't grab the key frame(an "I" frame), or if it is to far
into the video, a blank (black) image is placed into the placeholder.


Austin Myers
MS PowerPoint MVP Team

PowerPoint Video and PowerPoint Sound Solutions www.pfcmedia.com




Brian Lynn said:
ok, poor choice of words with "embedded" but that is the generic term used
for video in powerpoint around my clients, etc.

by black over lay I mean exactly the black box on the projector... The
provided link is all informantion I already know... as I explained in my
original post...

I am a driver/update nut and everything I use is updated to the fullest
extent everytime I leave to op a show.

The question was: Why. I need to tell my clients why. I know how to fix
it,
well, I know how to make it work the way I need to... but they want to
know
WHY it happens... at this point they no longer care that I can fix it,
they
just care that I can't give them a better answer then "I dont know why"...
I
make speculations but it just never seems to cut it.

Thanks for the response and the link. It may help someone, but I already
knew all that and more...

Echo S said:
First, the video isn't embedded, it's linked.

Second, not sure what exactly you mean by a "black overlay," but see
this:
Videos play correctly on computer but not on projector (black box)
http://www.rdpslides.com/pptfaq/FAQ00467.htm

--
Echo [MS PPT MVP] http://www.echosvoice.com
Fixing PowerPoint Annoyances
http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/powerpointannoy/
How to Prevent PowerPoint Overload (March 23 webcast)
http://tinyurl.com/bp2h8


Brian Lynn said:
I know how to fix this issue but its a goofy work around...

I run PowerPoint on laptops pretty much all the time. I would prefer
desktops but for travel its just not a good idea to take a tower...

So embedded video... How come PowerPoint displays a black overlay on
some
videos (when using both local LCD and external)? Doesnt seem to matter
the
format(codec) or length... I have found no real rhyme or reason to
when/why
this happens but it really freaks out my clients...

I am used to it and I just make sure that my Primary display is the
external, or I run through a VGA to RGBHV interface and shutdown my
local
LCD
and use just the vga loop out on the box to feed a external monitor,
sending
the RGB signal to the graphic screen switch...

Is there a way to prevent having to do these work arounds? Not that its
really an issue I would just love to have a real, concise answer for my
clients and none of the video engineers I talk to are computer nuts!
lol...
good thing too keeps me employed!
 
G

Guest

So I am confused... why would a first frame freeze effect playback? Its no
longer frozen... This issue occurs during playback... if the video is
stillframe I see it no problem on both screens...

This issue applies to video presentation in powerpoint on a laptop using
both screen where one screen gets video, the other gets a black box, as the
video PLAYS...

Thanks for the response, appreciate the input...

Austin Myers said:
Let's see if I can shed some light on it.

When you insert a video into PPT you are creating a placeholder. Normally
this placeholder is populated by the first key frame of the video. (PPT
does it.) There is NO movie there, just an image of the first key frame.

As I am certain you are aware, some videos do not have any key frames.
(Depends how it was encoded) or the first key frame is more than a second or
so into the video. This can also happen if the first few frames are "B"
frames. If PPT can't grab the key frame(an "I" frame), or if it is to far
into the video, a blank (black) image is placed into the placeholder.


Austin Myers
MS PowerPoint MVP Team

PowerPoint Video and PowerPoint Sound Solutions www.pfcmedia.com




Brian Lynn said:
ok, poor choice of words with "embedded" but that is the generic term used
for video in powerpoint around my clients, etc.

by black over lay I mean exactly the black box on the projector... The
provided link is all informantion I already know... as I explained in my
original post...

I am a driver/update nut and everything I use is updated to the fullest
extent everytime I leave to op a show.

The question was: Why. I need to tell my clients why. I know how to fix
it,
well, I know how to make it work the way I need to... but they want to
know
WHY it happens... at this point they no longer care that I can fix it,
they
just care that I can't give them a better answer then "I dont know why"...
I
make speculations but it just never seems to cut it.

Thanks for the response and the link. It may help someone, but I already
knew all that and more...

Echo S said:
First, the video isn't embedded, it's linked.

Second, not sure what exactly you mean by a "black overlay," but see
this:
Videos play correctly on computer but not on projector (black box)
http://www.rdpslides.com/pptfaq/FAQ00467.htm

--
Echo [MS PPT MVP] http://www.echosvoice.com
Fixing PowerPoint Annoyances
http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/powerpointannoy/
How to Prevent PowerPoint Overload (March 23 webcast)
http://tinyurl.com/bp2h8


I know how to fix this issue but its a goofy work around...

I run PowerPoint on laptops pretty much all the time. I would prefer
desktops but for travel its just not a good idea to take a tower...

So embedded video... How come PowerPoint displays a black overlay on
some
videos (when using both local LCD and external)? Doesnt seem to matter
the
format(codec) or length... I have found no real rhyme or reason to
when/why
this happens but it really freaks out my clients...

I am used to it and I just make sure that my Primary display is the
external, or I run through a VGA to RGBHV interface and shutdown my
local
LCD
and use just the vga loop out on the box to feed a external monitor,
sending
the RGB signal to the graphic screen switch...

Is there a way to prevent having to do these work arounds? Not that its
really an issue I would just love to have a real, concise answer for my
clients and none of the video engineers I talk to are computer nuts!
lol...
good thing too keeps me employed!
 
A

Austin Myers

Ah, I see I didn't understand your question. If you are seeing a playing
video on the lappie screen and a black box on the projector then the problem
lays in the hardware/environment and not PPT.

They usual suspects are, DirectX, video driver(s), signal out settings, and
possibly hardware acceleration.

You need to understand the video is not really being shown "in" Powerpoint.
DirectX is being used to create an overlay on top of the PPT slide. (That
is why no PPT object can be "on top" of a playing video.) To be blunt, many
laptops have a hard time doing this due to the way video is intigrated on
the MoBo and the switching of signal output.

I wish I had a general cure all for it but I don't. My best advice is to
make certain the latest video drivers are installed (usually behind when it
comes to lappies even if new from the factory), the latest version of
DirectX is installed, and then experiment with the signal output functions.
(Be certain to run the DirectX test to make certain all is working.) If
that doesn't work I would try reducing video hardware acceleration.

Unfortuantely lappie video systems tend to be vendor specific so trial and
error is the order of the day.



Austin Myers
MS PowerPoint MVP Team

PowerPoint Video and PowerPoint Sound Solutions www.pfcmedia.com






Brian Lynn said:
So I am confused... why would a first frame freeze effect playback? Its no
longer frozen... This issue occurs during playback... if the video is
stillframe I see it no problem on both screens...

This issue applies to video presentation in powerpoint on a laptop using
both screen where one screen gets video, the other gets a black box, as
the
video PLAYS...

Thanks for the response, appreciate the input...

Austin Myers said:
Let's see if I can shed some light on it.

When you insert a video into PPT you are creating a placeholder.
Normally
this placeholder is populated by the first key frame of the video. (PPT
does it.) There is NO movie there, just an image of the first key frame.

As I am certain you are aware, some videos do not have any key frames.
(Depends how it was encoded) or the first key frame is more than a second
or
so into the video. This can also happen if the first few frames are "B"
frames. If PPT can't grab the key frame(an "I" frame), or if it is to
far
into the video, a blank (black) image is placed into the placeholder.


Austin Myers
MS PowerPoint MVP Team

PowerPoint Video and PowerPoint Sound Solutions www.pfcmedia.com




Brian Lynn said:
ok, poor choice of words with "embedded" but that is the generic term
used
for video in powerpoint around my clients, etc.

by black over lay I mean exactly the black box on the projector... The
provided link is all informantion I already know... as I explained in
my
original post...

I am a driver/update nut and everything I use is updated to the fullest
extent everytime I leave to op a show.

The question was: Why. I need to tell my clients why. I know how to fix
it,
well, I know how to make it work the way I need to... but they want to
know
WHY it happens... at this point they no longer care that I can fix it,
they
just care that I can't give them a better answer then "I dont know
why"...
I
make speculations but it just never seems to cut it.

Thanks for the response and the link. It may help someone, but I
already
knew all that and more...

:

First, the video isn't embedded, it's linked.

Second, not sure what exactly you mean by a "black overlay," but see
this:
Videos play correctly on computer but not on projector (black box)
http://www.rdpslides.com/pptfaq/FAQ00467.htm

--
Echo [MS PPT MVP] http://www.echosvoice.com
Fixing PowerPoint Annoyances
http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/powerpointannoy/
How to Prevent PowerPoint Overload (March 23 webcast)
http://tinyurl.com/bp2h8


I know how to fix this issue but its a goofy work around...

I run PowerPoint on laptops pretty much all the time. I would prefer
desktops but for travel its just not a good idea to take a tower...

So embedded video... How come PowerPoint displays a black overlay on
some
videos (when using both local LCD and external)? Doesnt seem to
matter
the
format(codec) or length... I have found no real rhyme or reason to
when/why
this happens but it really freaks out my clients...

I am used to it and I just make sure that my Primary display is the
external, or I run through a VGA to RGBHV interface and shutdown my
local
LCD
and use just the vga loop out on the box to feed a external monitor,
sending
the RGB signal to the graphic screen switch...

Is there a way to prevent having to do these work arounds? Not that
its
really an issue I would just love to have a real, concise answer for
my
clients and none of the video engineers I talk to are computer nuts!
lol...
good thing too keeps me employed!
 
Ad

Advertisements

G

Guest

This is basically what I've been telling my clients, and none of them has
ever been happy when I gently suggest their laptops are not up to par for
what they want to do... specially when mine does it just fine... but mine has
a full desktop replacement form and a true non-mobile X600 chipset for
graphics. They know even less about thier hardware then they do about
PowerPoint. And don't even try to talk to them about why they need to bring
thier proprietary video codecs! Its like greek to them, but that's ok, keeps
me employed I guess (though I think some of the actually believe I can do
magic at times!).

Thanks for the response!

Austin Myers said:
Ah, I see I didn't understand your question. If you are seeing a playing
video on the lappie screen and a black box on the projector then the problem
lays in the hardware/environment and not PPT.

They usual suspects are, DirectX, video driver(s), signal out settings, and
possibly hardware acceleration.

You need to understand the video is not really being shown "in" Powerpoint.
DirectX is being used to create an overlay on top of the PPT slide. (That
is why no PPT object can be "on top" of a playing video.) To be blunt, many
laptops have a hard time doing this due to the way video is intigrated on
the MoBo and the switching of signal output.

I wish I had a general cure all for it but I don't. My best advice is to
make certain the latest video drivers are installed (usually behind when it
comes to lappies even if new from the factory), the latest version of
DirectX is installed, and then experiment with the signal output functions.
(Be certain to run the DirectX test to make certain all is working.) If
that doesn't work I would try reducing video hardware acceleration.

Unfortuantely lappie video systems tend to be vendor specific so trial and
error is the order of the day.



Austin Myers
MS PowerPoint MVP Team

PowerPoint Video and PowerPoint Sound Solutions www.pfcmedia.com






Brian Lynn said:
So I am confused... why would a first frame freeze effect playback? Its no
longer frozen... This issue occurs during playback... if the video is
stillframe I see it no problem on both screens...

This issue applies to video presentation in powerpoint on a laptop using
both screen where one screen gets video, the other gets a black box, as
the
video PLAYS...

Thanks for the response, appreciate the input...

Austin Myers said:
Let's see if I can shed some light on it.

When you insert a video into PPT you are creating a placeholder.
Normally
this placeholder is populated by the first key frame of the video. (PPT
does it.) There is NO movie there, just an image of the first key frame.

As I am certain you are aware, some videos do not have any key frames.
(Depends how it was encoded) or the first key frame is more than a second
or
so into the video. This can also happen if the first few frames are "B"
frames. If PPT can't grab the key frame(an "I" frame), or if it is to
far
into the video, a blank (black) image is placed into the placeholder.


Austin Myers
MS PowerPoint MVP Team

PowerPoint Video and PowerPoint Sound Solutions www.pfcmedia.com




ok, poor choice of words with "embedded" but that is the generic term
used
for video in powerpoint around my clients, etc.

by black over lay I mean exactly the black box on the projector... The
provided link is all informantion I already know... as I explained in
my
original post...

I am a driver/update nut and everything I use is updated to the fullest
extent everytime I leave to op a show.

The question was: Why. I need to tell my clients why. I know how to fix
it,
well, I know how to make it work the way I need to... but they want to
know
WHY it happens... at this point they no longer care that I can fix it,
they
just care that I can't give them a better answer then "I dont know
why"...
I
make speculations but it just never seems to cut it.

Thanks for the response and the link. It may help someone, but I
already
knew all that and more...

:

First, the video isn't embedded, it's linked.

Second, not sure what exactly you mean by a "black overlay," but see
this:
Videos play correctly on computer but not on projector (black box)
http://www.rdpslides.com/pptfaq/FAQ00467.htm

--
Echo [MS PPT MVP] http://www.echosvoice.com
Fixing PowerPoint Annoyances
http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/powerpointannoy/
How to Prevent PowerPoint Overload (March 23 webcast)
http://tinyurl.com/bp2h8


I know how to fix this issue but its a goofy work around...

I run PowerPoint on laptops pretty much all the time. I would prefer
desktops but for travel its just not a good idea to take a tower...

So embedded video... How come PowerPoint displays a black overlay on
some
videos (when using both local LCD and external)? Doesnt seem to
matter
the
format(codec) or length... I have found no real rhyme or reason to
when/why
this happens but it really freaks out my clients...

I am used to it and I just make sure that my Primary display is the
external, or I run through a VGA to RGBHV interface and shutdown my
local
LCD
and use just the vga loop out on the box to feed a external monitor,
sending
the RGB signal to the graphic screen switch...

Is there a way to prevent having to do these work arounds? Not that
its
really an issue I would just love to have a real, concise answer for
my
clients and none of the video engineers I talk to are computer nuts!
lol...
good thing too keeps me employed!
 
E

Echo S

Then do as I do and explain it's an issue with hardware, usually their video
card, and leave it at that. Don't suggest their system isn't up to par,
because that's not necessarily the issue. Really, it's just that some video
cards handle multimedia and PPT better than others....

--
Echo [MS PPT MVP] http://www.echosvoice.com
Fixing PowerPoint Annoyances http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/powerpointannoy/
How to Prevent PowerPoint Overload (March 23 webcast)
http://tinyurl.com/bp2h8


Brian Lynn said:
This is basically what I've been telling my clients, and none of them has
ever been happy when I gently suggest their laptops are not up to par for
what they want to do... specially when mine does it just fine... but mine
has
a full desktop replacement form and a true non-mobile X600 chipset for
graphics. They know even less about thier hardware then they do about
PowerPoint. And don't even try to talk to them about why they need to
bring
thier proprietary video codecs! Its like greek to them, but that's ok,
keeps
me employed I guess (though I think some of the actually believe I can do
magic at times!).

Thanks for the response!

Austin Myers said:
Ah, I see I didn't understand your question. If you are seeing a playing
video on the lappie screen and a black box on the projector then the
problem
lays in the hardware/environment and not PPT.

They usual suspects are, DirectX, video driver(s), signal out settings,
and
possibly hardware acceleration.

You need to understand the video is not really being shown "in"
Powerpoint.
DirectX is being used to create an overlay on top of the PPT slide.
(That
is why no PPT object can be "on top" of a playing video.) To be blunt,
many
laptops have a hard time doing this due to the way video is intigrated on
the MoBo and the switching of signal output.

I wish I had a general cure all for it but I don't. My best advice is to
make certain the latest video drivers are installed (usually behind when
it
comes to lappies even if new from the factory), the latest version of
DirectX is installed, and then experiment with the signal output
functions.
(Be certain to run the DirectX test to make certain all is working.) If
that doesn't work I would try reducing video hardware acceleration.

Unfortuantely lappie video systems tend to be vendor specific so trial
and
error is the order of the day.



Austin Myers
MS PowerPoint MVP Team

PowerPoint Video and PowerPoint Sound Solutions www.pfcmedia.com






Brian Lynn said:
So I am confused... why would a first frame freeze effect playback? Its
no
longer frozen... This issue occurs during playback... if the video is
stillframe I see it no problem on both screens...

This issue applies to video presentation in powerpoint on a laptop
using
both screen where one screen gets video, the other gets a black box, as
the
video PLAYS...

Thanks for the response, appreciate the input...

:

Let's see if I can shed some light on it.

When you insert a video into PPT you are creating a placeholder.
Normally
this placeholder is populated by the first key frame of the video.
(PPT
does it.) There is NO movie there, just an image of the first key
frame.

As I am certain you are aware, some videos do not have any key frames.
(Depends how it was encoded) or the first key frame is more than a
second
or
so into the video. This can also happen if the first few frames are
"B"
frames. If PPT can't grab the key frame(an "I" frame), or if it is to
far
into the video, a blank (black) image is placed into the placeholder.


Austin Myers
MS PowerPoint MVP Team

PowerPoint Video and PowerPoint Sound Solutions www.pfcmedia.com




ok, poor choice of words with "embedded" but that is the generic
term
used
for video in powerpoint around my clients, etc.

by black over lay I mean exactly the black box on the projector...
The
provided link is all informantion I already know... as I explained
in
my
original post...

I am a driver/update nut and everything I use is updated to the
fullest
extent everytime I leave to op a show.

The question was: Why. I need to tell my clients why. I know how to
fix
it,
well, I know how to make it work the way I need to... but they want
to
know
WHY it happens... at this point they no longer care that I can fix
it,
they
just care that I can't give them a better answer then "I dont know
why"...
I
make speculations but it just never seems to cut it.

Thanks for the response and the link. It may help someone, but I
already
knew all that and more...

:

First, the video isn't embedded, it's linked.

Second, not sure what exactly you mean by a "black overlay," but
see
this:
Videos play correctly on computer but not on projector (black box)
http://www.rdpslides.com/pptfaq/FAQ00467.htm

--
Echo [MS PPT MVP] http://www.echosvoice.com
Fixing PowerPoint Annoyances
http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/powerpointannoy/
How to Prevent PowerPoint Overload (March 23 webcast)
http://tinyurl.com/bp2h8


I know how to fix this issue but its a goofy work around...

I run PowerPoint on laptops pretty much all the time. I would
prefer
desktops but for travel its just not a good idea to take a
tower...

So embedded video... How come PowerPoint displays a black overlay
on
some
videos (when using both local LCD and external)? Doesnt seem to
matter
the
format(codec) or length... I have found no real rhyme or reason
to
when/why
this happens but it really freaks out my clients...

I am used to it and I just make sure that my Primary display is
the
external, or I run through a VGA to RGBHV interface and shutdown
my
local
LCD
and use just the vga loop out on the box to feed a external
monitor,
sending
the RGB signal to the graphic screen switch...

Is there a way to prevent having to do these work arounds? Not
that
its
really an issue I would just love to have a real, concise answer
for
my
clients and none of the video engineers I talk to are computer
nuts!
lol...
good thing too keeps me employed!
 
S

Steve Rindsberg

Man is that an understatement....

So I'm wondering ... some time back, people would use PCMCIA video cards to get
round the limitations of onboard laptop video.

Is this a possible way of solving "lappie can't cut it" problems?
 
G

Guest

Would love to see a PCMCIA video card =) Even better one for the PCIe??(i
think)slot on my new laptop...

Austin I dont directly tell them their hardware isnt up to par... just
that's how they take it when I tell them their hardware isnt going to do what
they would like it to...

Best way I've found to solve this, and still be able to locally monitor the
PPT (when you are shipping vga out to a remote display, like a
projector/screen) is to DA (distribution amp) the output on the lappy and not
use the local screen at all... Have not run into a laptop that cant do
that... some might be choppy or drop major frames but they all seem to be
able avoid the black box with just single monitor running...

Thanks for all the input guys!
 
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S

Steve Rindsberg

Would love to see a PCMCIA video card =) Even better one for the PCIe??(i
think)slot on my new laptop...

Try googling "pcmcia video adapter"

All kinds of interesting stuff, including a $90 USB gadget that lets you add second
video out to a lappie.

Whether any of it's any good ... ???
 

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