Lost my lease!


J

JimL

Is there something an ordinary person can glean from the following Event
Viewer error messages?

"Your computer has lost the lease to its IP address 192.168.100.2 on the
Network Card with network address 0006253F71E1."

I don't remember signing a lease!

Scanning recent Event View entries I see quite a few DHCP errors.

There's also this one:

"The IP address lease 76.127.54.187 for the Network Card with network
address 0006253F71E1 has been denied by the DHCP server 0.0.0.0 (The DHCP
Server sent a DHCPNACK message)."

They sound ominous.

Thanks
 
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S

Steve Winograd [MS-MVP]

Is there something an ordinary person can glean from the following Event
Viewer error messages?

"Your computer has lost the lease to its IP address 192.168.100.2 on the
Network Card with network address 0006253F71E1."

I don't remember signing a lease!

Scanning recent Event View entries I see quite a few DHCP errors.

There's also this one:

"The IP address lease 76.127.54.187 for the Network Card with network
address 0006253F71E1 has been denied by the DHCP server 0.0.0.0 (The DHCP
Server sent a DHCPNACK message)."

They sound ominous.

Thanks

DHCP errors are common. If your computer isn't having trouble with
its network connection, ignore them. If it is, we can troubleshoot
the problem.

When connected directly to a cable modem, your computer's network
connection obtains (leases) an IP address from your Internet service
provider. That IP address uniquely identifies your computer and
allows web sites to send traffic to you. The assignment is for a
specific period of time. Before the end of that time, your computer
renews the address. Sometimes, the computer (you) and the DHCP server
(Comcast) argue with each other, with the details going to the event
log, before they agree on an address.

The IP address 192.168.100.2 appears to be one that your Comcast cable
modem assigned to your computer during a temporary Internet service
outage. The other IP address that you listed appears to be one
belonging to Comcast in Tennessee.
--
Best Wishes,
Steve Winograd, MS-MVP (Windows Desktop Experience)

Microsoft Most Valuable Professional Program
http://mvp.support.microsoft.com
 
J

JimL

Steve Winograd said:
DHCP errors are common. If your computer isn't having trouble with
its network connection, ignore them. If it is, we can troubleshoot
the problem.

When connected directly to a cable modem, your computer's network
connection obtains (leases) an IP address from your Internet service
provider. That IP address uniquely identifies your computer and
allows web sites to send traffic to you. The assignment is for a
specific period of time. Before the end of that time, your computer
renews the address. Sometimes, the computer (you) and the DHCP server
(Comcast) argue with each other, with the details going to the event
log, before they agree on an address.

The IP address 192.168.100.2 appears to be one that your Comcast cable
modem assigned to your computer during a temporary Internet service
outage. The other IP address that you listed appears to be one
belonging to Comcast in Tennessee.
--
Best Wishes,
Steve Winograd, MS-MVP (Windows Desktop Experience)

Microsoft Most Valuable Professional Program
http://mvp.support.microsoft.com


Thank you very much.
 
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S

Steve Winograd [MS-MVP]

Thank you very much.

You're welcome. BTW, the Event Viewer logs are full of
ominous-looking error reports that are actually inconsequential. You
could go crazy looking at all of them. I only look at them when
troubleshooting a specific, observable problem.
--
Best Wishes,
Steve Winograd, MS-MVP (Windows Desktop Experience)

Microsoft Most Valuable Professional Program
http://mvp.support.microsoft.com
 

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