HP Officejet 6310 All-In-One printer won't turn on


J

Juan Wei

The printer was fine until I spilled some coffee that got into its base.
I dried it and let it sit for hours. Then I switched it on. It came on
for a few minutes and then gave a "memory card error".

I searched for a solution and someone suggested inserting a card and
waiting for a "use only one card at a time" message. Then turn it off.

I did that and several minutes later, tried to turn it on. Absolutely no
response.

The LED on the power cable (where it plugs into the printer) and the LED
in the printer (next to the socket) are both on, so I believe that the
external power supply is OK.

What can I do? Thanks in advance.
 
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P

philo 

The printer was fine until I spilled some coffee that got into its base.
I dried it and let it sit for hours.
Probably a mistake it would take considerably longer than that to dry
out...plus you would have needed to have cleaned the coffee out of it
with rubbing alcohol .


Then I switched it on. It came on
 
J

Juan Wei

philo has written on 10/16/2013 8:28 PM:
Probably a mistake it would take considerably longer than that to dry
out...plus you would have needed to have cleaned the coffee out of it
with rubbing alcohol .
Any idea how to open the case?
 
P

Paul

Juan said:
philo has written on 10/16/2013 8:28 PM:

Any idea how to open the case?
There is mention of Torx screws, and the scanner
cover is a compression plastic thing. It would be
pretty difficult to verbally describe the complete
disassembly of the thing.

http://www.fixya.com/support/t13213121-disassemble_hp_officejet_6310

With printers, the idea is for the thing to be
"one shiny big black plastic box". That means they don't want
fasteners to be visible on the outside. That means the
screws will either be inserted up through the bottom.
Or, with the unit hinged open, major sub-assemblies will
be bolted down to the base.

Just have a look, and take your best guess. Like
we all do.

When no screws are visible, and the plastic is pretty
rigid, then compression tabs are probably holding it
together, Which means you'll need to work on the seams,
and use your wood chisel set (the chisels that never
get used for woodworking, and spend their days
prying cheesy plastic products apart) :) LCD
monitors are an example of a thing involving
those tabs. You have to be "good" to not
leave any marks :) That, and broadband modem/router/switch
boxes need the chisel set too. Some chisels keep
the pried apart pieces from snapping together
again, while you work on depressing the next
tab.

"My favorite prying tools..."
- you can use a hammer on the plastic handle
- I think I chipped the blade on one of these,
too much violence...

http://toolmonger.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/04/Fuller_chisels.jpg

Now, if I owned one of these instead, it would be
ruined in no time. The handles just don't hold up.
The Fuller ones make "better weapons".

http://www.woodcraft.com/Images/products/600/07F28.jpg

Paul
 
J

Juan Wei

Paul has written on 10/17/2013 3:03 AM:
There is mention of Torx screws, and the scanner
cover is a compression plastic thing. It would be
pretty difficult to verbally describe the complete
disassembly of the thing.

http://www.fixya.com/support/t13213121-disassemble_hp_officejet_6310

With printers, the idea is for the thing to be
"one shiny big black plastic box". That means they don't want
fasteners to be visible on the outside. That means the
screws will either be inserted up through the bottom.
Or, with the unit hinged open, major sub-assemblies will
be bolted down to the base.

Just have a look, and take your best guess. Like
we all do.

When no screws are visible, and the plastic is pretty
rigid, then compression tabs are probably holding it
together, Which means you'll need to work on the seams,
and use your wood chisel set (the chisels that never
get used for woodworking, and spend their days
prying cheesy plastic products apart) :) LCD
monitors are an example of a thing involving
those tabs. You have to be "good" to not
leave any marks :) That, and broadband modem/router/switch
boxes need the chisel set too. Some chisels keep
the pried apart pieces from snapping together
again, while you work on depressing the next
tab.

"My favorite prying tools..."
- you can use a hammer on the plastic handle
- I think I chipped the blade on one of these,
too much violence...

http://toolmonger.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/04/Fuller_chisels.jpg

Now, if I owned one of these instead, it would be
ruined in no time. The handles just don't hold up.
The Fuller ones make "better weapons".

http://www.woodcraft.com/Images/products/600/07F28.jpg

Paul
Thanks, Paul. Valuable information!

However, I think I will just take it to the recycling depot. :) I was
enjoying its speed of printing, but I will happily go back to the Canon
AIO that it replaced.

Thanks again.
 
E

eoptionsonline123

As you have mentioned power supply is OK. Still you have to check your printer again.
 
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J

Juan Wei

(e-mail address removed) has written on 10/24/2013 2:52 AM:
As you have mentioned power supply is OK. Still you have to check your printer again.
??? Looks like the circuit board has a popped trace. Off to the
Recycling Center!
 

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