How do I replace a hard drive?


G

Guest

I have an 80 GB ide drive and an 80 GB SATA drive. Windows XP Pro is
installed on the ide drive. The SATA drive is divided into 2 partitions, 1
for games and 1 for my personal files. My motherboard only has one ide
connector so with the ide drive connected I can only use one of my two
DVD-ROM drives. I have recently purchased a 320 GB SATA drive and
transferred everything from the 80 GB SATA drive onto the new drive. I want
to tranfer everything (including the operating system) from the 80GB ide
drive to the 80GB SATA drive, and then give the empty ide drive to my niece,
and finally be able to use both DVD-ROM drives again. All three hard drives
are currently connected to this computer.

How do I do this? I can't imagine I'm the only person on earth to ever want
to replace a hard drive, but I've been going around and around in "Help" and
on the forums and can't seem to find what I need.

Any help would be appreciated. Sorry if I went into too much detail...
 
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A

Anna

AntiMnemonic said:
I have an 80 GB ide drive and an 80 GB SATA drive. Windows XP Pro is
installed on the ide drive. The SATA drive is divided into 2 partitions,
1
for games and 1 for my personal files. My motherboard only has one ide
connector so with the ide drive connected I can only use one of my two
DVD-ROM drives. I have recently purchased a 320 GB SATA drive and
transferred everything from the 80 GB SATA drive onto the new drive. I
want
to tranfer everything (including the operating system) from the 80GB ide
drive to the 80GB SATA drive, and then give the empty ide drive to my
niece,
and finally be able to use both DVD-ROM drives again. All three hard
drives
are currently connected to this computer.

How do I do this? I can't imagine I'm the only person on earth to ever
want
to replace a hard drive, but I've been going around and around in "Help"
and
on the forums and can't seem to find what I need.

Any help would be appreciated. Sorry if I went into too much detail...


AntiMnemonic:
First of all, you needn't apologize for going into "too much detail". You
did well. Usually the problem is just the opposite in that posters raising
issues or problems don't provide sufficient detail so it's difficult, if not
impossible, for potential responders to offer intelligent & reasonable
suggestions or possible courses of action to resolve the issue/problem.


1. I take it that your current 80 GB SATA HDD was being used as a secondary
HDD, i.e., it was used for backup and/or storage purposes, i.e., it did not
contain an OS. So that your new 320 GB HDD is, in effect, a copy of that 80
GB SATA HDD.

2. So what you want to do is to "clone" the contents of your present boot
drive - the 80 GB PATA HDD (what you refer to as an "ide drive") - to the 80
GB SATA HDD. You can accomplish this in basically one of two ways...
a. Use the disk copying utility that's included with a retail boxed version
of the HDD, or which you can usually obtain as a free download from the
manufacturer of the HDD. Should you go this route you should obtain the disk
copying utility from the manufacturer of either of the two disks that you
will be using for the transfer (cloning) of data.
b. Use a third-party disk cloning/disk imaging program such as Acronis True
Image or Casper 4.0 (my current favorite) to effect the disk cloning
operation.

My recommendation would be to use the latter option. The third-party
programs are generally easier to use and more consistent in their results.
Then, too, you can use such a program for routine, systematic backup
purposes in the future.

I'm wondering why you're not planning to use your new 320 GB HDD as your
day-to-day working HDD, i.e., your boot drive, in lieu of the 80 GB one. As
a general proposition that's what I would be recommending. And then using
your 80 GB HDD as the backup/storage device. Is it that you have an enormous
amount of data that you're using for storage purposes? So that you need a
larger-capacity HDD than the 80 GB one for that purpose?
Anna
 
G

Guest

AntiMnemonic:
First of all, you needn't apologize for going into "too much detail". You
did well. Usually the problem is just the opposite in that posters raising
issues or problems don't provide sufficient detail so it's difficult, if not
impossible, for potential responders to offer intelligent & reasonable
suggestions or possible courses of action to resolve the issue/problem.


1. I take it that your current 80 GB SATA HDD was being used as a secondary
HDD, i.e., it was used for backup and/or storage purposes, i.e., it did not
contain an OS. So that your new 320 GB HDD is, in effect, a copy of that 80
GB SATA HDD.

2. So what you want to do is to "clone" the contents of your present boot
drive - the 80 GB PATA HDD (what you refer to as an "ide drive") - to the 80
GB SATA HDD. You can accomplish this in basically one of two ways...
a. Use the disk copying utility that's included with a retail boxed version
of the HDD, or which you can usually obtain as a free download from the
manufacturer of the HDD. Should you go this route you should obtain the disk
copying utility from the manufacturer of either of the two disks that you
will be using for the transfer (cloning) of data.
b. Use a third-party disk cloning/disk imaging program such as Acronis True
Image or Casper 4.0 (my current favorite) to effect the disk cloning
operation.

My recommendation would be to use the latter option. The third-party
programs are generally easier to use and more consistent in their results.
Then, too, you can use such a program for routine, systematic backup
purposes in the future.

I'm wondering why you're not planning to use your new 320 GB HDD as your
day-to-day working HDD, i.e., your boot drive, in lieu of the 80 GB one. As
a general proposition that's what I would be recommending. And then using
your 80 GB HDD as the backup/storage device. Is it that you have an enormous
amount of data that you're using for storage purposes? So that you need a
larger-capacity HDD than the 80 GB one for that purpose?
Anna

Thank you! Casper 4.0 worked wonderfully and I am now operating from the
SATA drive. Windows started perfectly first time - in fact it started a
little faster than from the old drive.

In reply to your question as to what I use the larger drive for, I may have
mistated what is on there. Half is for games (I already have two on there
that are bigger than 5 GB!) and the other half is "working space" - it's
where I install all programs that are non-gaming related, and where I have
all my photographs and scans. Most days I add about 100 MB of photos and I
haven't even started saving them in RAW format yet, so I think I'm really
going to appreciate the extra space!

All that should really be on the C: is the operating system itself, and some
of what I call "utility programs". Oh, and everything that won't let me
choose where to install it. Keeping the amount of data on this drive makes
it easier and faster to defrag, which encourages me to do it more regularly.

I plan to keep the old hard drive as a backup for the next two weeks. If
all goes well, it will get a complete wipe and then donated to my neice. She
currently has about 3% of free space on her 40GB drive, so I'm sure she'll
appreciate it!

Again, thank you very much Anna for your help. It was an incredibly
painless operation.
 
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A

Anna

AntiMnemonic said:
I have an 80 GB ide drive and an 80 GB SATA drive. Windows XP Pro is
installed on the ide drive. The SATA drive is divided into 2 partitions,
1
for games and 1 for my personal files. My motherboard only has one ide
connector so with the ide drive connected I can only use one of my two
DVD-ROM drives. I have recently purchased a 320 GB SATA drive and
transferred everything from the 80 GB SATA drive onto the new drive. I
want
to tranfer everything (including the operating system) from the 80GB ide
drive to the 80GB SATA drive, and then give the empty ide drive to my
niece,
and finally be able to use both DVD-ROM drives again. All three hard
drives
are currently connected to this computer.

How do I do this? I can't imagine I'm the only person on earth to ever
want
to replace a hard drive, but I've been going around and around in "Help"
and
on the forums and can't seem to find what I need.

Any help would be appreciated. Sorry if I went into too much detail...

:>


Thank you! Casper 4.0 worked wonderfully and I am now operating from the
SATA drive. Windows started perfectly first time - in fact it started a
little faster than from the old drive.

In reply to your question as to what I use the larger drive for, I may
have
mistated what is on there. Half is for games (I already have two on there
that are bigger than 5 GB!) and the other half is "working space" - it's
where I install all programs that are non-gaming related, and where I have
all my photographs and scans. Most days I add about 100 MB of photos and
I
haven't even started saving them in RAW format yet, so I think I'm really
going to appreciate the extra space!

All that should really be on the C: is the operating system itself, and
some
of what I call "utility programs". Oh, and everything that won't let me
choose where to install it. Keeping the amount of data on this drive
makes
it easier and faster to defrag, which encourages me to do it more
regularly.

I plan to keep the old hard drive as a backup for the next two weeks. If
all goes well, it will get a complete wipe and then donated to my neice.
She
currently has about 3% of free space on her 40GB drive, so I'm sure she'll
appreciate it!

Again, thank you very much Anna for your help. It was an incredibly
painless operation.


AntiMnemonic:
Glad it all worked out. We've been mighty impressed with the Casper 4.0 disk
cloning program and we've been using it nearly exclusively for our disk
cloning operations as well as recommending that program to others.

As to your objective in keeping your boot drive "lean & mean" as it were, so
that it contains only the OS and some utility programs...if you're
comfortable with that arrangement and find that it meets your particular
needs...so be it. It's not the way we generally organize our PC systems but
whatever works for *you* - and not anyone else - must, of course, be your
guiding principle in organizing your system.

But now that you're working with the Casper 4.0 program which carries out
its disk-cloning operations effectively and with reasonably fast speed due
to its "SmartClone" technology so that you have a real incentive to back up
your system on a much more frequent basis than heretofore, might you give
consideration to incorporating *all* the data that's now contained on both
HDDs, i.e., the OS, your utility programs, your games, photos, etc. - in
short, *everything*, on a single large-capacity HDD such as your 320 GB HDD,
or perhaps even a larger one (see below)? And then, on a routine &
systematic basis, use your Casper 4.0 program to clone the contents of that
HDD to another large-capacity HDD (see below) and thus establish a
near-failsafe backup program?

Given today's modern HDDs & PC systems, I really don't see any intrinsic
value in this division of OS, programs, and user-created data either from a
performance or safety point of view - *provided* that one routinely employs
a comprehensive backup program such as provided by a disk cloning (or disk
imaging) one like the Casper 4.0 program that we've been discussing.

I might add that we are not "defragmenters", nor are we "partitioneers".
Based on our own experience and the various tests we have come across to
determine the effectiveness of defragmenting one's HDD, except for some very
unusual circumstances which seem to apply to only a tiny number of cases in
our experience, we are not convinced that routine disk defragmenting in an
XP environment is of any significant value. When users ask us about how
often they should defragment their disks we usually provide the previous
comment, but if they feel more comfortable in doing so - at least doing so
from time-to-time - we recommend carrying out those operations on New Years
Day and Independence Day. More than sufficient in our view. But once
again...if *you* believe routine defragmenting improves the operation of
your system - by all means pursue that course. At least except for a rare
occurrence we haven't found any issues of the defragmentation process going
awry and causing significant problems in an XP OS environment as we did
all-too-frequently encounter with previous operating systems.

I just thought I would add the above for your consideration and perhaps
others who might be interested.

It certainly sounds like you could use another large-capacity HDD. Are you
convenient to a Staples store? I notice Staples has on sale the WD 500 GB
SATA HDD this week - $119.99 (and no mail-in rebates!!). We've previously
worked with that disk and it's a nice one so if your present finances allow
you to swing for another large-capacity HDD, consider this one.
Anna
 

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