Home Network Printer IP Address Changes


B

BeeJ

Home Network Printer IP Address Changes

My home network has a Win 7 Pro 64 PC and a Win XP Pro laptop.
All are up to date.

From time to time the printer IP address changes. Seems to happen when
I plug in new network equipment like a NAS.

The Win 7 Pro 64 systems seems to track the IP address change while the
Win XP Pro laptop does not. I have to fiddle to figure out what to do
to get the Win XP Pro laptop connected.

Is there a way to
1) stop the printer IP address from changing?
2) get Win XP Pro to track the Printer IP address change?
3) anything else to consider?

Please give detailed steps or links to things you have found to be
reliable fixes.

Thanks!
 
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Z

Zaphod Beeblebrox

On Thu, 10 Jan 2013 14:40:37 -0500, "David H. Lipman"
All that information and NONE inportrant pertaining to the printer in
question and how it is networked.

+1

Statically set the IP on the un-named Printer/Print Server.

Or alternatively, reserve an IP address for the printer's MAC address
in the router's DHCP configuration (I dislike managing a network with
static IP addresses.)

--
Zaphod

Arthur: All my life I've had this strange feeling that there's
something big and sinister going on in the world.
Slartibartfast: No, that's perfectly normal paranoia. Everyone in the
universe gets that.
 
B

BeeJ

Doubt you know the innards of my printer.
It is a Samsung 3175FN tied directly to the router.

So if all my stuff is at 192.168.1.xxx is there any address range
within xxx that are usually used for printers or do I just pick some
arbitrary number up to 255 or?
 
B

BeeJ

On Thu, 10 Jan 2013 14:40:37 -0500, "David H. Lipman"


Or alternatively, reserve an IP address for the printer's MAC address
in the router's DHCP configuration (I dislike managing a network with
static IP addresses.)

It is a LinkSys WRT610N rev 1 (they fixed stuff in rev 2).
Can you please give me a little more terminology details on how to do
this?
And how do I get the MAC address easily?
Thanks!
 
V

VanguardLH

Zaphod Beeblebrox said:
"David H. Lipman" ...


Or alternatively, reserve an IP address for the printer's MAC address
in the router's DHCP configuration (I dislike managing a network with
static IP addresses.)

Not all consumer-grade routers have the option to assign IP by MAC.
When I had a Dlink, I could do that. When I got the Linksys BEFSR41,
that feature was missing. That configuration is lost when the router is
reset. Static IP assignment at the host will survive a router reset.

With the Dlink, I could assign IP by MAC plus I could punch holes in its
firewall using port forwarding by MAC which remained the same whether
the host (to which traffic got forwarded through the router) had static
or dynamic IP addressing. When the Dlink died and replaced by the
Linksys, assign IP by MAC and port forward by MAC weren't available.
Also, I believe the Dlink had an export feature so if it got reset then
I could import my saved settings. No such export/import in my Linksys.
 
V

VanguardLH

BeeJ said:
Zaphod Beeblebrox supposed:


It is a LinkSys WRT610N rev 1 (they fixed stuff in rev 2).
Can you please give me a little more terminology details on how to do
this?
And how do I get the MAC address easily?

RTFM

[Online copy of] User Guide
http://homedownloads.cisco.com/downloads/userguide/WRT610N_V20_UG_NC-WEB.pdf
page 9
"Manually adding a client"

You'll need to know the MAC (Media Access Control) address of the
network adapter in the host to which you want to always assign the same
IP address. You may be able to identify that host from info displayed
by the router; else, on the host and in a command shell, run:

ipconfig.exe /all

The 12 hexidecimal digit (48 bit) "Physical Address" field is the MAC
address of the network adapter. If you have multiple enabled network
adapters, use the one that is connected to the router.
 
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V

VanguardLH

BeeJ said:
Doubt you know the innards of my printer.
It is a Samsung 3175FN tied directly to the router.

So if all my stuff is at 192.168.1.xxx is there any address range
within xxx that are usually used for printers or do I just pick some
arbitrary number up to 255 or?

RTFM

On the host (your printer), configure its TCP/IP settings so it uses a
static IP address which should also be *outside* the IP address range
provided by your router. If your router's DHCP addressing range is
192.168.1.100 for 50 addresses (.100 to .149), then start using static
IP addresses configured on your hosts that are below that range (e.g.,
192.168.1.10 or above that range (e.g., 192.168.1.200). Don't use .0,
..1, .254, or .255 as those are reserved or often inuse.

For a networked printer, presumably it incorporates in internal web
server or on-device control panel that lets you configure its settings.
Is it this your printer in the link below?

http://www.samsung.com/us/computer/printers/CLX-3175FN/XAA

If so, it's online user manual at:

http://downloadcenter.samsung.com/content/UM/200910/20091026132451875/Guide_EN.pdf

says on page 25 under "Setting IP Address" how to configure that device
to use a static IP address.
 
V

VanguardLH

David H. Lipman said:
From: "BeeJ"


192.168.1.1 is the Router

Well, sometimes it is. RTFM to find out what is its default IP address.
192.168.1.255 is rarely available as an address.

..255 is the multicast address. Both .0 and .255 are IANA reserved.
Don't use those.
Therefore you can choose any IP from 192.168.1.2 ~ 192.168.1.254 that is
NOT in use by another device.

Typically routers used .1 for their default static IP address. Some
newer home routers are now defaulting to the .254 address. Best not to
use that one, either.

Use .2 to .253 EXCEPT do not use a static IP address within the IP
address range of the upstream DHCP server (router). If the router's
DHCP server is configured to supply IP addresses starting from
192.168.1.100 for 100 addresses then don't use any static IP addresses
on your hosts in the 192.168.1.100 to 192.168.1.199 range to prevent
assignment overlap. The DHCP server doesn't know about the static IP
addresses you've assigned elsehwere.
 
B

BeeJ

Glad you are there.
Thanks for this tutorial.
Let me study it and try some things out.
 
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V

VanguardLH

VanguardLH said:
Typically routers used .1 for their default static IP address. Some
newer home routers are now defaulting to the .254 address. Best not to
use that one, either.

By the way, I also remember that some routers (via their installer) add
an entry into the 'hosts' file (under %windir%\system32\drivers\etc).
They expect you to find their router using a hostname rather than an IP
address. I think Netgear is one like this. The entry they add has both
their hostname and their IP address so you can use either.
 

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