HDMI to DVI on a laptop


P

plebism

I have an Acer laptop with HDMI out and was hoping to connect the laptop (Win 7) to my monitor via a HDMI to DVI cable

Problem is .. it doesn't work - the laptop doesn't register the monitor as being connected.

I bought the cable from eBay - are there different types?? or any other ideas?

Thx :D
 
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P

Paul

plebism said:
I have an Acer laptop with HDMI out and was hoping to connect the laptop (Win 7) to my monitor via a HDMI to DVI cable

Problem is .. it doesn't work - the laptop doesn't register the monitor as being connected.

I bought the cable from eBay - are there different types?? or any other ideas?

Thx :D

How do you select the input source on the LCD monitor ?

Is there a button to push, to select which connector ?

Or is that control buried in the OSD (on-screen display) of the LCD monitor ?

The laptop GPU should be able to impedance-sense the
connected HDMI device (100 ohm differential termination on four
signal pairs).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hdmi

On the laptop side, there is usually a hotkey you press, to change
video configuration. Perhaps F5. Options might be: Panel, External,
Panel/External both clones, and so on. The sequence repeats, so with
enough key presses on F5, you get back to Panel again and the laptop
screen should again work.

Just a guess,

Paul
 
F

Flasherly

I have an Acer laptop with HDMI out and was hoping to connect the laptop (Win 7) to my monitor via a HDMI to DVI cable

Problem is .. it doesn't work - the laptop doesn't register the monitor as being connected.

I bought the cable from eBay - are there different types?? or any other ideas?

Thx :D

Somebody who sells monitors. They're expensive. Nobody wants to go
through crap when a $1000 piece of gear arrives. Call their credit
card and file a dispute to make them eat $200 shipping. Get on the
horn and weasel it out of them. They should know damn well why at
those costs. The ideas behind HDMI, some - Digital Protection and
Copyrights - suffice to say why, then, is almost all serious equipment
sold now comes with a standard VGA included 15 years after "the
industry" began shifting its weight for directional purposes? First
place I look, anyway, is for a VGA connection, and, No - I won't buy
their product without it, and, Yes, I've been there, plugged in an
HDMI that didn't work. Maybe someday I'll try again and it will.
Maybe not.
 
P

plebism

How do you select the input source on the LCD monitor ?

Samsung syncmaster with one DVI port on the back, I believe it auto detects the input and swaps automatically

Is there a button to push, to select which connector ?
No


Or is that control buried in the OSD (on-screen display) of the LCD monitor ?

Ill check but I don't think there is

The laptop GPU should be able to impedance-sense the

connected HDMI device (100 ohm differential termination on four

signal pairs).



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hdmi



On the laptop side, there is usually a hotkey you press, to change

video configuration. Perhaps F5. Options might be: Panel, External,

Panel/External both clones, and so on. The sequence repeats, so with

enough key presses on F5, you get back to Panel again and the laptop

screen should again work.

I tried that but no joy - the monitor stays blank - if I disconnect the cable from the back of the monitor then an OSD windows pops up saying no input analog/digital ... so something must be happening

I've also checked DVI types of cable and I seem to have the right one - a dual link DVI-D
Just a guess,



Paul

Thanks mate :)

I have cycled through the Function button but it still doesn't bring the monitor into life

My monitor is a Samsung Syncmaster and I believe it is auto detect between analog and digital input but I will try going into the OSD menu again
 
P

Paul

plebism said:
Samsung syncmaster with one DVI port on the back, I believe it auto detects the input and swaps automatically



Ill check but I don't think there is



I tried that but no joy - the monitor stays blank - if I disconnect the cable from the back of the monitor then an OSD windows pops up saying no input analog/digital ... so something must be happening

I've also checked DVI types of cable and I seem to have the right one - a dual link DVI-D


Thanks mate :)

I have cycled through the Function button but it still doesn't bring the monitor into life

My monitor is a Samsung Syncmaster and I believe it is auto detect between analog and digital input but I will try going into the OSD menu again

Would the cable type, happen to be a "splitter" ?

Some cable sellers, offer a splitter. In theory, what that
does, is use the (+) signal to drive one output, the (-)
signal to drive the other output. The signal amplitude
is reduced. I'm not sure of the compatibility issues with
such cables. You'd probably only use a splitter or "Y"
cable, with two monitors connected. You would not want
just one monitor on a Y cable, with the other connector
open circuit.

*******

For a straight-thru cable (this is the one I think you're using...)

DVI -------- HDMI

there should not be that much that can go wrong.
The cable needs to connect four pairs (three color pairs
and clock pair) for basic operation.

You could try testing with some other gear. That is, if
you can find some other cable, or LCD monitor, to test with.
Maybe the laptop output is broken ? Unlikely, but you
have to consider all the possibilities.

A cable which is too long, should produce a "colored snow"
picture on the screen. Once the signal amplitude drops
on the cable, the mis-detected signal looks like snow.

The resistor terminations of the LCD monitor, should have
been detected by the laptop, if they were electrically
connected. It would look like this electrically.

Laptop TMDS_Data0+ ------------- 100 ohm resistor ---+
|
TMDS_Data0- ----------------------------------+

TMDS_Data1+ ------------- 100 ohm resistor ---+
|
TMDS_Data1- ----------------------------------+

TMDS_Data2+ ------------- 100 ohm resistor ---+
|
TMDS_Data2- ----------------------------------+

TMDS_Clock+ ------------- 100 ohm resistor ---+
|
TMDS_Clock- ----------------------------------+

\_________________/
|
Inside the LCD Monitor

The video chip can tell, when the 100 ohm resistors are
touching the signals. And then, in Display control panel,
in the area where you set up custom setup details,
you'd see the second monitor detected. Even in Linux
you should be able to see it (Linux also has a display
control where you can see multiple monitors).

HTH,
Paul
 
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P

plebism

Would the cable type, happen to be a "splitter" ?



Some cable sellers, offer a splitter. In theory, what that

does, is use the (+) signal to drive one output, the (-)

signal to drive the other output. The signal amplitude

is reduced. I'm not sure of the compatibility issues with

such cables. You'd probably only use a splitter or "Y"

cable, with two monitors connected. You would not want

just one monitor on a Y cable, with the other connector

open circuit.



*******



For a straight-thru cable (this is the one I think you're using...)



DVI -------- HDMI



there should not be that much that can go wrong.

The cable needs to connect four pairs (three color pairs

and clock pair) for basic operation.



You could try testing with some other gear. That is, if

you can find some other cable, or LCD monitor, to test with.

Maybe the laptop output is broken ? Unlikely, but you

have to consider all the possibilities.



A cable which is too long, should produce a "colored snow"

picture on the screen. Once the signal amplitude drops

on the cable, the mis-detected signal looks like snow.



The resistor terminations of the LCD monitor, should have

been detected by the laptop, if they were electrically

connected. It would look like this electrically.



Laptop TMDS_Data0+ ------------- 100 ohm resistor ---+

|

TMDS_Data0- ----------------------------------+



TMDS_Data1+ ------------- 100 ohm resistor ---+

|

TMDS_Data1- ----------------------------------+



TMDS_Data2+ ------------- 100 ohm resistor ---+

|

TMDS_Data2- ----------------------------------+



TMDS_Clock+ ------------- 100 ohm resistor ---+

|

TMDS_Clock- ----------------------------------+



\_________________/

|

Inside the LCD Monitor



The video chip can tell, when the 100 ohm resistors are

touching the signals. And then, in Display control panel,

in the area where you set up custom setup details,

you'd see the second monitor detected. Even in Linux

you should be able to see it (Linux also has a display

control where you can see multiple monitors).



HTH,

Paul

wow that's a super geeky reply - respect to your knowledge :D

I have tried just a normal HDMI cable to my TV and that works ... so it does suggest that the HDMI/DVI cable may be the culprit

Ill see about using on another device and or a different cable

Thanks for all your help Paul :)

Simon
 
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