Getting a wireless HDMI transmitter to connect a Dell optiplex 3010to LG 47LN5400 TV screen


T

t

We have a Dell optiplex 3010 small form factor with VisionTEK ATI Radeon
HD 5570 1 GB DDR3 SFF Quad VHDCI x16 PCIe Graphics Card
http://accessories.us.dell.com/sna/productdetail.aspx?c=us&l=en&s=gen&sku=a4621685

Two of the DVI outputs from the graphic card are going to Dell
Professional P2012H 20" Monitor with LED) via DVI
The third DVI output from the ATI Radeon HD 5570 will need a DVI-HDMI
adapter
http://www.cdw.com/shop/products/IOGEAR-video-adapter-HDMI-DVI/2395310.aspx?
, then a wireless HDMI transmitter so that the TV screen LG 47LN5400
http://www.lg.com/us/tvs/lg-47LN5400-led-tv can work as the third
monitor for the Optiplex 3010 wirelessly

The distance between the computer and TV screen is around 10 feet with
some wooden chairs and a glass table in between. The Optiplex 3010 is on
the floor and the TV screen is mounted close to ceiling.

The TV screen will be used for displaying Word, Powerpoint documents and
occasionally some training videos.

I have stressed the benefits of using just a 10 feet HDMI wire citing
much lower cost and reliable connectivity, but am not the decision maker.

1. Would a wireless HDMI transmitter like
http://www.amazon.com/IOGEAR-GW3DHDKIT-Wireless-Digital-Channel/dp/B00630WKGI
work for our needs?




Thanks
 
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P

Paul

t said:
We have a Dell optiplex 3010 small form factor with VisionTEK ATI Radeon
HD 5570 1 GB DDR3 SFF Quad VHDCI x16 PCIe Graphics Card
http://accessories.us.dell.com/sna/productdetail.aspx?c=us&l=en&s=gen&sku=a4621685


Two of the DVI outputs from the graphic card are going to Dell
Professional P2012H 20" Monitor with LED) via DVI
The third DVI output from the ATI Radeon HD 5570 will need a DVI-HDMI
adapter
http://www.cdw.com/shop/products/IOGEAR-video-adapter-HDMI-DVI/2395310.aspx?
, then a wireless HDMI transmitter so that the TV screen LG 47LN5400
http://www.lg.com/us/tvs/lg-47LN5400-led-tv can work as the third
monitor for the Optiplex 3010 wirelessly

The distance between the computer and TV screen is around 10 feet with
some wooden chairs and a glass table in between. The Optiplex 3010 is on
the floor and the TV screen is mounted close to ceiling.

The TV screen will be used for displaying Word, Powerpoint documents and
occasionally some training videos.

I have stressed the benefits of using just a 10 feet HDMI wire citing
much lower cost and reliable connectivity, but am not the decision maker.

1. Would a wireless HDMI transmitter like
http://www.amazon.com/IOGEAR-GW3DHDKIT-Wireless-Digital-Channel/dp/B00630WKGI

work for our needs?

Thanks

This solution assumes the devices are in the same room. The receiver
has "junk" to put somewhere, such as a wall adapter (or USB cable) for
power. If the TV has a powered USB port, you can likely run the
receiver off USB, or if not, a wall adapter to barrel connector
power source can be used. $400 MSRP, street maybe $275

http://www.gefen.com/kvm/gtv-whd-1080p-sr.jsp?prod_id=10709

This one is used between rooms, and includes some sort of
IR passthru so you can control something from the other room
with a remote control.

http://www.gefen.com/kvm/gtv-whd-1080p-lr-blk.jsp?prod_id=10922

Units are based on WHDI and transmit around 5GHz.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whdi

WHDI 1.0 provides a high-quality, uncompressed wireless link which
supports data rates of up to 3 Gbit/s

(allowing 1920×1080 @ 60 Hz @ 24-bit) in a 40 MHz channel

and data rates of up to 1.5 Gbit/s

(allowing 1280×720 @ 60 Hz @ 24-bit or
1920×1080 @ 30 Hz @ 24-bit) in a single 20 MHz channel

of the 5 GHz unlicensed band, conforming to FCC and worldwide 5 GHz
spectrum regulations. Range is beyond 100 feet (30 m), through walls,
and latency is less than one millisecond.

The only question for me, would be how often interference from
802.11n in the 5GHz band, would knock the WHDI pair down
to 20MHz channel usage. They mention here, the similarity
of the two standards "What is the relation between WHDI and 802.11n",
but don't go into details. (Which is usually a bad sign.) Wifi quotes
a large number of channels too, but channel spacing reduces
that to a practical choice of three channels.

https://web.archive.org/web/20091213050118/http://www.whdi.org/WHDISIG/FAQ.htm

With Wifi devices, don't expect a free lunch, and you won't
get any surprises you didn't expect. Wifi always over-quotes
bandwidth.

Paul
 
T

t

This solution assumes the devices are in the same room. The receiver
has "junk" to put somewhere, such as a wall adapter (or USB cable) for
power. If the TV has a powered USB port, you can likely run the
receiver off USB, or if not, a wall adapter to barrel connector
power source can be used. $400 MSRP, street maybe $275

http://www.gefen.com/kvm/gtv-whd-1080p-sr.jsp?prod_id=10709

This one is used between rooms, and includes some sort of
IR passthru so you can control something from the other room
with a remote control.

http://www.gefen.com/kvm/gtv-whd-1080p-lr-blk.jsp?prod_id=10922

Units are based on WHDI and transmit around 5GHz.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whdi

WHDI 1.0 provides a high-quality, uncompressed wireless link which
supports data rates of up to 3 Gbit/s

(allowing 1920×1080 @ 60 Hz @ 24-bit) in a 40 MHz channel

and data rates of up to 1.5 Gbit/s

(allowing 1280×720 @ 60 Hz @ 24-bit or
1920×1080 @ 30 Hz @ 24-bit) in a single 20 MHz channel

of the 5 GHz unlicensed band, conforming to FCC and worldwide 5 GHz
spectrum regulations. Range is beyond 100 feet (30 m), through walls,
and latency is less than one millisecond.

The only question for me, would be how often interference from
802.11n in the 5GHz band, would knock the WHDI pair down
to 20MHz channel usage. They mention here, the similarity
of the two standards "What is the relation between WHDI and 802.11n",
but don't go into details. (Which is usually a bad sign.) Wifi quotes
a large number of channels too, but channel spacing reduces
that to a practical choice of three channels.

https://web.archive.org/web/20091213050118/http://www.whdi.org/WHDISIG/FAQ.htm


With Wifi devices, don't expect a free lunch, and you won't
get any surprises you didn't expect. Wifi always over-quotes
bandwidth.

Paul

Thanks Paul,

Since we are in same room, less distance(about 10 feet), are there any
other options which are priced a little less?

I understand it is priced around 245 at
http://www.provantage.com/gefen-gtv-whd-1080p-sr~7GEFN06X.htm

As always, your time and assistance in this forum is appreciated.
 
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P

Paul

t said:
Thanks Paul,

Since we are in same room, less distance(about 10 feet), are there any
other options which are priced a little less?

I understand it is priced around 245 at
http://www.provantage.com/gefen-gtv-whd-1080p-sr~7GEFN06X.htm

As always, your time and assistance in this forum is appreciated.

You could start with the WHDI forum/website and trace down who
makes the things.

This is an article from 2007, when they made their first chipset.
Chipset prices tend to drop, as larger quantities are shipped
(in the millions). The first generation of WHDI, they were
using two chipsets in parallel to do HD.

http://gizmodo.com/293937/amimons-full-1080p-wireless-hdmi-confirmed-as-ready-and-shipping

Naturally, Wifi for HDMI has been around for a while, with
Wimax units existing for a while and then going out of production.
(I liked the antenna shape on these.)

http://www.gefen.com/kvm/dproduct.jsp?prod_id=4318

There would also be a smattering of units based on regular Wifi,
and with lots of compression thrown in (so movie watching would
not be an option with those). At the time these things
came out, they all seemed wonderful. The only advantage
of time passing, is now sites like Amazon will have
customer reviews for some of them, so you can find out
how terrible they really were.

AS near as I can tell, on this one, the PC end has regular Wifi
and runs some software. The software compresses the content of the
PC screen, and sends it via Wifi to the hardware box (where the
hardware box is located next to the TV set). I would definitely
want to see a review for this, because conceptually it's bound
to be a bit of a stinker. (It's like "Winmodems", buy a solution
that does it all in hardware instead... Software based solutions
are hardly satisfying.)

http://www.startech.com/AV/Extender...-Extender-with-Audio-High-Definition~WIFI2HD2

If you "must have" an install with no wires, $400 isn't so bad.
Lots of this stuff in the past, was $1000 a pair, and part of the
reason is the low quantities shipped. If they don't sell
very many, they can't even pay for the engineering.

Paul
 

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