Got a spare half hour -- then read these !

Abarbarian

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I have put some snippets from the articles below the links, but you need to read the whole story to see whats going on.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/7493365.stm

In the UK Virgin Media is sending out letters to subscribers on behalf of the BPI, accusing people of downloading unlicensed music, while proposed laws in Canada would make it a criminal offense to load your iPod with music from CDs you have bought.

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That's what the music industry wants at the moment - if you dare to damage their economic viability then you have to be excluded from everything the internet has to offer.

Of course you're also then cut off from buying from Amazon or Sainsbury's, clicking on Google adverts, sending campaign donations to your favourite candidate or taking part in a great deal of economic activity that benefits other organisations.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/7486743.stm

The BPI wants all UK ISPs to sign up to a so-called three strikes policy - where users of file sharing networks get two warnings and are then disconnected if they are sharing copyright files.
So far only Virgin Media has officially signed up and it is keen to stress that currently it is running an education-only campaign and that no-one has been thrown off the network.

Virgin said the wording on the envelope which contains the warning letter sent to 800 customers - which threatens consumers with disconnection - was a "mistake".


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The current system involves the BPI policing file sharing networks. It looks for illegal traffic and identifies the IP address from which it has come and informs the ISP.

There is no distinction made between someone who has downloaded one illegal track and someone who has downloaded thousands.

A joint letter from Virgin and the BPI is then sent to the individual.



http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/7488009.stm


Google must divulge the viewing habits of every user who has ever watched any video on YouTube, a US court has ruled.

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Digital rights group the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) called the ruling a "set-back to privacy rights".

The viewing log, which will be handed to Viacom, contains the log-in ID of users, the computer IP address (online identifier) and video clip details.

While the legal battle between the two firms is being contested in the US, it is thought the ruling will apply to YouTube users and their viewing habits everywhere.



http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/7312460.stm


Yet the CBC saved the best for last. Hours after the initial broadcast, it released a high-resolution version of the finale without copy protection on BitTorrent, the peer-to-peer protocol that is often linked with unauthorised file sharing.

The public is now able to download, copy, and share the program without restrictions.


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The use of BitTorrent may come as a surprise to those who mistakenly equate file sharing solely with infringing activities. BitTorrent and other peer-to-peer technologies are finding increasing favour with legitimate businesses attracted to its ability to distribute content in an efficient, cost-effective fashion.

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More broadcasters are likely to follow suit in the months ahead, complicating the claims of copyright lobby groups that BitTorrent is a "pirate" technology and ISP practices that hamper consumer access to authorised content online.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/6379309.stm

The IIPA recommendations are designed to highlight the inadequacies of IP protection around the world, yet the lobby group ultimately shines the spotlight on how US copyright policy has become out-of-touch and isolated from much of the rest of the globe.

The IIPA criticisms fall into three broad categories. First, the lobby group is very critical of any country that does not follow the US model for implementing the World Intellectual Property Organisation's Internet Treaties.

Those treaties, which create legal protection for technological protection measures, have generated enormous controversy with many experts expressing concern about their impact on consumer rights, privacy, free speech, and security research.


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There are literally hundreds of similar examples, as countries from Europe, Asia, Africa, North and South America are criticised for not adopting the DMCA, not extending the term of copyright, not throwing enough people in jail, or creating too many exceptions to support education and other societal goals.

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Countries singled out for criticism should not be deceived into thinking that their laws are failing to meet an international standard, no matter what US lobby groups say.

Rather, those countries should know that their approach - and the criticism that it inevitably brings from the US - places them in very good company.

happywave.gif

 
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So what happens if everyone that is downloading music refuses to stop. They gonna imprison them all

Nah.

Thing is so many folk nowadays leave their networks unprotected that is only going to cause multitudes of people using a neighbour connection to download the next bg album for their own benefit and thus not getting caught passing the blame to the user of that registered IP#

It's pathetic. Thousands of users will drop from the radar and hundreds of thousand of people all over the globe will terminate their contracts with their IP's stating a breach of contract over the internet privacy protection act. Also the laws from different countries vary that much it would take years to rewrite them and set them into effect.

Bring it on record companys. You have been screwing us for decades. Payback due IMO

Personally I dont give a rats bum. I dont buy or download albums or even listen to music tbh except for the radio and even then I get bored of it
 

floppybootstomp

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I'm a huge music fan.

I've been spending money on music for fifty years.

Bought my first single at age seven.

Then have promoted music via DJ-ing for over 30 years and generated sales.

Sometimes I will d/l music and check it out. If I like it I'll buy it.

I honestly think the music industry owes me.

I do not feel guilty about many things which are a little difficult to talk about on this forum.

Whatever they do there will always be a way round it.

In the seventies I recorded my albums to cassettes to save them from wear and tear. I'm still doing much the same thing.

If it wasn't for me - a person who is enthusiastically listening to, buying, checking out, talking about and spreading the word about music, the music industry would have fewer sales.

So, Virgin, BPI, RIAA and all you record company stooges - go stuff yourselves :)
 
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Someone i know had is bandwidth limited by Virgin it's not worth him trying to get online in the evening now because it's so slow.I'm much the same as FBS i think i have kept a big part of the music industry going for years now.
 

Abarbarian

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Those articles are not just about the music. They are about freedom and who is trying to control the internet. If these shady gits from the BPI and IIPA and otheres like them gain control of the internet then we will all be facing the same sort of repression that users in China are stiffled with now.

:(
 
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Frodo said:
Someone i know had is bandwidth limited by Virgin it's not worth him trying to get online in the evening now

Simple answer to this, get them to change ISP
 

floppybootstomp

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Abarbarian said:
Those articles are not just about the music. They are about freedom and who is trying to control the internet. If these shady gits from the BPI and IIPA and otheres like them gain control of the internet then we will all be facing the same sort of repression that users in China are stiffled with now.

:(

Aye, I realise that, and it's kinda scary.

The Internet has often been heralded as the last great home of free expression. Thus far it has been free of policing and almost anarchic, which I thoroughly aprove of.

If the blue meanies succeed that will be just another form of suppression.

Not quite sure why, but I'm reminded of the film 'Cabaret'. Perhaps an underlying menace is present in both scenarios.
 

Abarbarian

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Once you have even a glimmer of recent history and a sensetive and active mind then indeed Cabaret is a disturbing movie. Thats what makes it one of the greats.

Freedom is a personal idea, every one has their own view on it.

If you want to maintain your freedom then you have to be prepared to fight for it and that can be by signing a pettition, simply posting your views in a forum, or some simple act.

For example, I never drop litter, even way back in the 70's I never dropped litter. I will give up a seat on a train or bus to the elderly or infirm. I always have anti virus running on my pc. On busy roads I will slow down and let someone out of a side road.
Small acts |I grant you but thats how change or stasis is maintained, by millions of people making such small acts every day.

So if you want to live in a "free" world then you have to do something to keep it or make it as "free" as you want.

:D
 
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Correct me if I am wrong but!

Why do the likes of virgin supply V+ Box for TV recording + the capability to record to a DVD/CD? If that’s not breaking copyright laws what is it? If I record music from a channel I am able to put it to disc and play it wily nily.

So it appears they are breaking the copyright laws for allowing the aforesaid

Oh I give up the bloody law is more than an ass:wall:
 

cirianz

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Hmmmm... seems to me that, if someone checks out a few movie trailers & clips on you-tube & decides they want to go see it, or hire/buy the DVD, then you-tube's just done them a favour.
I know I very seldom waste money on a movie unless I'm pretty sure that I want to see it.
I also reckon, if they really want to check out rates of useage for different clips on you-tube what they might want to do, instead of using it to prosecute, use it to find out which films/old TV serieses etc are ripe for a re-release.
I know I've found plenty of random clips from old shows that I would definitely love to buy if they were available.
Plus found a few new musicians I'd never heard of before but love, AND puchase now.
And my daughter has once again come to me with money to ask me to make a purchase online for her for merchandise for one of her favourite bands, whom she keeps track of... lol, this particular band IS one that she discovered on you-tube & she is currently rabidly trying to convert everyone she knows into fandom.
The entertainment industry might do better if it looked at places like you-tube & P2P as free advertising and places to maintain fan loyalty during the dry periods between releases.

I tend to look at it in the same way as I do my paintings.
sure someone can print out a copy of one of my piccys off my website & stick it on their wall
Great, free advertising for me, pleasure for them, & who knows, they might even want to buy a piccy one day. Win - win.
Bottom line... someone who is happy with just a printed picture, was not going to buy a painting anyway, I haven't lost anything and, since, to an artist... getting know & staying known is the difference between a career and a hobby, it seems to me I've gained.

The entertainment industry goes on a lot about how much money they are losing because of the internet. But it seems to me that, with all the extra exposure & expansion of market the internet creates... Well, to me they aren't looking poorer than they were 'back in the good old days' when there was no internet and the only outlet was the local music shop.
 

Abarbarian

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itsme said:
Correct me if I am wrong but!

Why do the likes of virgin supply V+ Box for TV recording + the capability to record to a DVD/CD? If that’s not breaking copyright laws what is it? If I record music from a channel I am able to put it to disc and play it wily nily.

So it appears they are breaking the copyright laws for allowing the aforesaid

Oh I give up the bloody law is more than an ass:wall:


Ah ha, they are not breaking the law by supplying equipment. You might be if you use it though.

:p
 

cirianz

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lol, yeah, like he said :thumb:
They can make profit selling you the equipment :)
Then make even more proffit suing your ass off if you ever use it :)

Quote: Angelspit (My daughter's above mentioned favourite band) "God made me a cannibal to fix problems like you" (song is called "100%") :lol:
 

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