Dumbest Question Ever - Shut Down and Start Up Issue


D

Dano

I have been having a shut down and start up issue that I think is so
simplistic, yet confounding, that I have decided to post here.

My computer runs properly, and all things are swell, until I shut down
from Windows XP Home SP2. My computer was built for me using an Inwin
box (looks a lot like this one:
http://www.in-win.us/products_pccase_series.php?cat_id=1&series_id=11&model_id=40)
and a Intel Motherboard, please see specs below. I shut it down,
through Start>Turn Off Computer>Shut Down, and it shuts down fine, but
I cannot use the power button the front to start it up again. I have
to use this wacked out procedure to start it up again:

1. Turn off main computer switch in back of tower.
2. Turn off Power to surge protector
3. Wait 5 seconds
4. Flip back on power on the back of the tower
5. Flip on bower to surge protector

Computer starts after that. What settings do I have wrong? Is it
bios, is it electrical, is it something else?

Here is the strange part, when I tested in the past and plugged right
into my wall (sans surge protector), this did not happen, but this
never happened until about 6 months ago and I have brought in a new
surge protector.

Thanks.
Dano

BIOS Date: 02/13/05
BIOS Type: American Megatrends licensed to Intel
BIOS ID: 63-0100-000001-00101111-021305-iSPGDL_G-RL865006
OEM Sign-On: BIOS Date: 02/13/05 22:02:08 V
Chipset: Intel 2570 rev 2
Superio: Unknown
OS: WinXP SP2
CPU: Intel(R) Pentium(R) 4 processor 2600 Mhz MAX: 3060 Mhz
BIOS ROM In Socket: No
BIOS ROM Size: 512K
Memory Installed: 1536 MB
Memory Maximum: 4096 MB
Memory Slot 01: 256 MB
Memory Slot 02: 512 MB
Memory Slot 03: 256 MB
Memory Slot 04: 512 MB
ACPI Revision: 1.0
 
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J

JAD

Dano said:
I have been having a shut down and start up issue that I think is so
simplistic, yet confounding, that I have decided to post here.

My computer runs properly, and all things are swell, until I shut down
from Windows XP Home SP2. My computer was built for me using an Inwin
box (looks a lot like this one:
http://www.in-win.us/products_pccase_series.php?cat_id=1&series_id=11&model_id=40)
and a Intel Motherboard, please see specs below. I shut it down,
through Start>Turn Off Computer>Shut Down, and it shuts down fine, but
I cannot use the power button the front to start it up again. I have
to use this wacked out procedure to start it up again:

1. Turn off main computer switch in back of tower.
2. Turn off Power to surge protector
3. Wait 5 seconds
4. Flip back on power on the back of the tower
5. Flip on bower to surge protector

Computer starts after that. What settings do I have wrong? Is it
bios, is it electrical, is it something else?

Here is the strange part, when I tested in the past and plugged right
into my wall (sans surge protector), this did not happen, but this
never happened until about 6 months ago and I have brought in a new
surge protector.


thats because you unplugged and replugged into the wall. The temporary
complete shut down allows the PSU to cool (or whatever the fault) and it
works again. Get a new PSU.
 
1

1932

Dano said:
I have been having a shut down and start up issue that I think is so
simplistic, yet confounding, that I have decided to post here.

My computer runs properly, and all things are swell, until I shut down
from Windows XP Home SP2. My computer was built for me using an Inwin
box (looks a lot like this one:
http://www.in-win.us/products_pccase_series.php?cat_id=1&series_id=11&model_id=40)
and a Intel Motherboard, please see specs below. I shut it down,
through Start>Turn Off Computer>Shut Down, and it shuts down fine, but
I cannot use the power button the front to start it up again. I have
to use this wacked out procedure to start it up again:

1. Turn off main computer switch in back of tower.
2. Turn off Power to surge protector
3. Wait 5 seconds
4. Flip back on power on the back of the tower
5. Flip on bower to surge protector

Computer starts after that. What settings do I have wrong? Is it
bios, is it electrical, is it something else?

Here is the strange part, when I tested in the past and plugged right
into my wall (sans surge protector), this did not happen, but this
never happened until about 6 months ago and I have brought in a new
surge protector.
Try starting and shut down, just plugging straight into
the wall. ( a few times).
If that solves it, it`s the surge protector, cutting in/out.
 
W

w_tom

Apparently some part of the power supply 'system' has become
marginal or defective. Which part? Collect numbers to better identify
it. Cooling, etc has nothing to do with the problem and is not a
solution. If cooling 'fixes' something, that something is 100%
defective.

Start with power to the power supply controller. That is a purple
wire from power supply to motherboard. A 3.5 digit multimeter is
required to measure that voltage - best by pushing probe into the nylon
connector where wires connect to motherboard. Number must exceed 4.87.
Posting that number here provides other useful information.

Next is green wire voltage both before and when power switch is
pressed. Voltage should exceed 2.0 volts before and drop to well below
0.8 volts when switch is pressed.

And finally what is voltage on wire from switch to power board. That
voltage between two wires should be well above 2 volts before switch is
pressed and drop to well below 0.8 volts when switch is pressed. All
these numbers obtained without disconnecting anything.

Your replies will only be as good as information (the numbers)
posted. What are these numbers when computer does and does not power
up?

Surge protector is completely irrelevant. What they hope you don't
learn to believe a myth; it connects computer directly to AC mains.
Any relationship between protector and your problem would be
coincidence - maybe created a problem only because computer was
temporarily disconnected.
 
R

Rod Speed

w_tom said:
Apparently some part of the power supply 'system' has become
marginal or defective. Which part? Collect numbers to better identify
it. Cooling, etc has nothing to do with the problem and is not a solution.
If cooling 'fixes' something, that something is 100% defective.
Start with power to the power supply controller. That is
a purple wire from power supply to motherboard. A 3.5
digit multimeter is required to measure that voltage - best
by pushing probe into the nylon connector where wires
connect to motherboard. Number must exceed 4.87.

Wrong, as always. This clown is so stupid that it cant even manage
to read and comprehend the ATX spec which actually says 4.75,
or even understand how multimeters work either, regardless of
how often its been told this VERY basic stuff.
Posting that number here provides other useful information.

Mostly all it provides is more pig ignorant drivel from you.
Next is green wire voltage both before and when power
switch is pressed. Voltage should exceed 2.0 volts before
and drop to well below 0.8 volts when switch is pressed.

Thats unlikely to be the problem given that unplugging it fixes the problem.
And finally what is voltage on wire from switch to power board.
That voltage between two wires should be well above 2 volts before
switch is pressed and drop to well below 0.8 volts when switch is
pressed. All these numbers obtained without disconnecting anything.
Your replies will only be as good as information (the numbers) posted.

Wrong again on those other numbers.
What are these numbers when computer does and does not power up?
Surge protector is completely irrelevant. What they hope you don't
learn to believe a myth; it connects computer directly to AC mains.
Any relationship between protector and your problem would be
coincidence - maybe created a problem only because computer was
temporarily disconnected.

More pig ignorant drivel that you have been corrected on time after time after time.

To the OP, if you are seriously considering what this clown has
posted, have a look at his history in groups.google first, particularly
the comments made about what he has posted in the past.
 
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D

Dano

Instantly. I thought it was my older surge protector, so I got a
pretty decent one, not high end, but pretty good, and the same issue
happened as soon as I plugged the sucker in.
 
D

Dano

Hey guys, Ron asked a question/commented on my other post,
http://groups-beta.google.com/group...23b5ac2ca0d/e8358d9b9203e4db#e8358d9b9203e4db,
that I may only need to turn off the towers main power button, wait a
few seconds and then turn it back on again to get my system to start
instead of my long, drawn out process below.

Indeed, I tested that theory, and when I shout down as indicated below,
I only really have to turn the back tower switch off, count to five and
turn it back on again. Thats good news I guess, but its annoying that
the front button does not seem to work.

Does this still sound like a PSU issue and do you think that it is
worth my time to fix on a system from 2003? I guess I would get it
fixed if it is risking other components in the PC to failure of some
sort.

Thanks for all the help.
Dano
 
R

Rod Speed

Dano said:
Hey guys, Ron asked a question/commented on my other post,
http://groups-beta.google.com/group...23b5ac2ca0d/e8358d9b9203e4db#e8358d9b9203e4db,
that I may only need to turn off the towers main power button,
wait a few seconds and then turn it back on again to get my
system to start instead of my long, drawn out process below.
Indeed, I tested that theory, and when I shout down as indicated
below, I only really have to turn the back tower switch off, count
to five and turn it back on again. Thats good news I guess, but
its annoying that the front button does not seem to work.
Does this still sound like a PSU issue

Yes, it looks like the PSU needs to discharge something
internally before it will start using the front button again.
and do you think that it is worth my time to fix on a system from 2003?

Really depends on how soon you plan to replace it. I wouldnt bother
myself, I'd just use the mains power switch on the odd occasion that
I did want to leave the system off for a few days etc and wear that
if I was planning to replace the whole system any time soon.
I guess I would get it fixed if it is risking other
components in the PC to failure of some sort.

Its unlikely to be risking anything to just keep using it like
that except that cheap power supplys can die rather
spectacularly and kill what is being powered by them.

Guess you could argue that the PSU may have some bad
caps inside and that you are taking some risk that the
problem may get worse and see it die rather spectacularly.

The risk of that happening isnt all that high tho.
 
J

johns

All of my older InWin boxes do that. If you
have the PC running, and you shut down
by just turning off the power, from then on,
the PC will power on as soon as AC is
applied. I have to start the things .. do a
soft power off, and then the front switch
works again ... until I remove AC standby
power somehow. Then, I'm right back to
the AC power on. All of them do that.

johns
 
J

JAD

johns said:
All of my older InWin boxes do that. If you
have the PC running, and you shut down
by just turning off the power, from then on,
the PC will power on as soon as AC is
applied

bios switch...power loss - power on

.. I have to start the things .. do a
 
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R

Rod Speed

All of my older InWin boxes do that.

Nope, he's talking about a different effect to you.
If you have the PC running, and you shut down by just turning off the power,

He isnt doing that.
from then on, the PC will power on as soon as AC is applied.
I have to start the things .. do a soft power off, and then the front
switch works again ... until I remove AC standby power somehow.
Then, I'm right back to the AC power on. All of them do that.

He isnt turning it off like that.
 
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D

Dano

That InWin psupply is goofy any way you
do it. It works, but it will make you nuts.

johns

Thank guys for all the help, I appreciate it. I am going to keep it
as is--no fixing the PSU--and buck up and get a new system before the
year is out. Wish me luck.

Dano
 

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