Downsizing from Windows 7 to XP Pro


D

Dennis

I recently bought a laptop it has Windows 7 on it I dont like it. when I put
in the XP disc it said compatibility issues. What do I need to do to get rid
of Win 7 and put on XP Pro?
 
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L

LVTravel

Dennis said:
I recently bought a laptop it has Windows 7 on it I dont like it. when I
put
in the XP disc it said compatibility issues. What do I need to do to get
rid
of Win 7 and put on XP Pro?
You may not be able to. First have you gone to the manufacturer's web site
and downloaded all the XP drivers for your computer model, including but not
limited to: motherboard, audio, video and network? If not do so before
trying to install XP. Can't find the drivers. Try the component
manufacturer's web site. Still can't find, you can't install XP on the
computer.

2nd. You will need to boot from the Windows XP disk and remove the
partition that Windows 7 is installed onto and then repartition, format and
install XP. A newer computer will have a SATA drive interface and XP does
not. Therefore you either need to have the XP SATA drivers on a floppy disk
and press F6 during the boot process or turn the SATA controller to it's
"IDE" mode in the computer's bios to be able to install XP on the computer.
You have to totally strip the boot partition on the hard drive to
"downgrade" and then install XP from scratch.

3rd. If this is an OEM disk that you have from another computer by
licensing rules you would not be permitted to install the operating system
on any other computer than the first it was installed onto. If retail it
can't be currently installed onto any other computer. If a branded disk
(Dell, Gateway, HP, etc.) it is an OEM and it is also probably bios locked
to the original computer it was installed onto.
 
L

LD55ZRA

Dennis said:
I recently bought a laptop it has Windows 7 on it I dont like it. when I put
in the XP disc it said compatibility issues. What do I need to do to get rid
of Win 7 and put on XP Pro?
You need to insert your Windows XP CD in the drive and you need to boot
the machine. You also need to follow the instructions on the screen
mainly you need to choose Quick Format and to reinstall Windows XP.

Please first check from your BIOS that your system is configured to boot
from a CD first rather from the HD. If you don't know how to do this, I
suggest read this article:

<http://pcsupport.about.com/od/fixtheproblem/ss/bootorderchange.htm>

hth
 
R

Richard in AZ

Dennis said:
I recently bought a laptop it has Windows 7 on it I dont like it. when I put
in the XP disc it said compatibility issues. What do I need to do to get rid
of Win 7 and put on XP Pro?
Find someone with a laptop that has Windows XP Pro on it and give that person your Laptop and $50
and you would be ahead of the game.
 
D

DL

I suppose when you buy a new car & don't like it you would then trade that
in for a 10 year old car?
 
B

Bruce Chambers

Dennis said:
I recently bought a laptop it has Windows 7 on it I dont like it. when I put
in the XP disc it said compatibility issues. What do I need to do to get rid
of Win 7 and put on XP Pro?

There could be a couple possible adverse repercussions of which you
should be aware. First and foremost, if the specific computer model in
question was designed specifically for Windows 7, there may well be no
WinXP-specific device drivers available to make the computer's diverse
components work properly. Consult the computer's manufacturer about the
availability of device drivers. Secondly, removing an OEM-installed
operating system and replacing it with another will almost invariably
void any and all support agreements and, sometimes in rare cases, even
the warranty. You would, at the very least, have to re-install Windows 7
before getting any support from the manufacturer. Again, consult the
computer's manufacturer for specifics.

How to uninstall Windows 7
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/971762

--

Bruce Chambers

Help us help you:


http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx/kb/555375

They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. ~Benjamin Franklin

Many people would rather die than think; in fact, most do. ~Bertrand Russell

The philosopher has never killed any priests, whereas the priest has
killed a great many philosophers.
~ Denis Diderot
 
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S

SC Tom

Richard in AZ said:
Find someone with a laptop that has Windows XP Pro on it and give that
person your Laptop and $50 and you would be ahead of the game.
Best solution yet!!
--
SC Tom

"Owning a handgun doesn't make you armed
any more than owning a guitar makes you a musician."
Lt. Col. J.D. "Jeff" Cooper, USMC, Ret.
 
B

bj

SC Tom said:
Best solution yet!!
--
I guess that if I ever pry my XP machines (one Home, one Pro) out of my
hands I will have no trouble finding them good home(s). Maybe I'll do that
instead of upgrading. :)

Actually, I hated Vista so much I *did* give that machine to a non-profit &
got me a new "downgraded to XP" laptop. (I still have the unopened Vista
disks that came along with it!)
bj
 
T

Twayne

In
LVTravel said:
You may not be able to. First have you gone to the
manufacturer's web site and downloaded all the XP drivers
for your computer model, including but not limited to:
motherboard, audio, video and network? If not do so before
trying to install XP. Can't find the drivers. Try the
component manufacturer's web site. Still can't find, you
can't install XP on the computer.
Mobo drivers for sure, along with anything else needed for the
chipset. But if the audio video and network are cards, then
the drivers are already present if they're needed. Plus XP
probably has drivers that would work until getting around to
the other installs.
2nd. You will need to boot from the Windows XP disk and
remove the partition that Windows 7 is installed onto and
then repartition, format and install XP.
Well, a multi-boot is often possible. But one does want to
start right from scratch, deleting and recreating the
partitions. XP will allow you to do up to 4 IIRC, which should
be fine.

A newer computer
will have a SATA drive interface and XP does not.
XP certainly does, since SP2, have the fixin's for SATA. My
nearly ten year old Gateway in fact had the controller and
connectors for 2 sata drives. No muss, no fuss; indicate which
one you want to be the boot drive, and go. The only downside I
came across was that I had to assign my own drive letters;
they weren't automatically assigned. But it's a simple job
with Drive Management, which is native to XP.
Therefore you either need to have the XP SATA drivers on a
floppy disk and press F6 during the boot process or turn
the SATA controller to it's "IDE" mode in the computer's
bios to be able to install XP on the computer.
I missed that. Where did the need for IDE mode come up? I
didn't see it mentioned and it's not an issue.

You have to
totally strip the boot partition on the hard drive to
"downgrade" and then install XP from scratch.
"Strip the hard drive" and installing XP from scratch
INCLUDES, and starts with, the deletion and re-creation of
partitions if you wish to do so. TAkes only seconds to do the
partition work, and then wait for the formats to be done. No
problem at all.
3rd. If this is an OEM disk that you have from another
computer by licensing rules you would not be permitted to
install the operating system on any other computer than the
first it was installed onto.
The disks have nothing to do with anything. As long as you
have the same version disk, ANY disk can be used. What
matters is the COA code - THAT is what's registered and kept
track of at MS. You can borrow any like OS disk to get things
going as long as you use your own key. They know the computer
by its contents and no other way.

If retail it can't be
currently installed onto any other computer.
A retail OS disk can be moved to any other computer you wish
to use it on. It's what distunguishes OEM from Retail, in
fact. It does not however have anything to do with the fact
that you cannot install the OS in more than one instance on
more than one computer, including with Virtual machines.
That's true no matter what and always has been.

If a branded
disk (Dell, Gateway, HP, etc.) it is an OEM and it is also
probably bios locked to the original computer it was
installed onto.
Actually, not necessarily, but it's becoming more common.
That's negligible compared to the problem of activation with
the correct COA. It doesn't care; if it's even the same
computer but too many things have been changed, you might have
some hoops to jump thru to get it activated. The algorithm
they use is rather complex and AFAIK anyway, still unknown in
public.

Please, get your facts right before posting things such as
this. You may have meant well, but there were a lot of
misleading things in your post.

HTH,

Twayne`
 
T

Twayne

In
Richard in AZ said:
Find someone with a laptop that has Windows XP Pro on it
and give that person your Laptop and $50 and you would be
ahead of the game.
That would work fine as long as it was activated with his own
key code from his own XP. If not, it will fail to be activated
though. And the keycode has to be for a like OS; Home or Pro -
one is not usable for the other in any way.

HTH,

Twayne`
 
T

Twayne

In
bj said:
I guess that if I ever pry my XP machines (one Home, one
Pro) out of my hands I will have no trouble finding them
good home(s). Maybe I'll do that instead of upgrading. :)

Actually, I hated Vista so much I *did* give that machine
to a non-profit & got me a new "downgraded to XP" laptop.
(I still have the unopened Vista disks that came along with
it!) bj
Same here. Hang onto them though; MS may just come up with a
way to finally make XP unusable since Vista and win7(Vista+)
have been such turds. Already, things like office7 won't
handle old versioned Office files without some hoops. They
hate backwards compatability.

HTH,

Twayne`
 
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L

LVTravel

Twayne said:
In

Mobo drivers for sure, along with anything else needed for the chipset.
But if the audio video and network are cards, then the drivers are already
present if they're needed. Plus XP probably has drivers that would work
until getting around to the other installs.
XP's disk won't have drivers for 2009-10 hardware. Where would the
"drivers are already present if they're needed" be located if not on the XP
disk and as stated I really don't think new hardware's drivers would be on a
disk that is more than 6 years older than the current hardware. I have a
USB wireless network card that was sold after Vista came out that doesn't
have XP drivers available for it from the manufacturer How would that
particular device ever be used with XP if it was an installed device in the
OP's new computer?
Well, a multi-boot is often possible. But one does want to start right
from scratch, deleting and recreating the partitions. XP will allow you to
do up to 4 IIRC, which should be fine.
The OP says he wants information to "need to do to get rid of Win 7" so my
comment is correct. Doesn't want Win 7 so a dual boot is not what the OP
wants.

A newer computer

XP certainly does, since SP2, have the fixin's for SATA. My nearly ten
year old Gateway in fact had the controller and connectors for 2 sata
drives. No muss, no fuss; indicate which one you want to be the boot
drive, and go. The only downside I came across was that I had to assign my
own drive letters; they weren't automatically assigned. But it's a simple
job with Drive Management, which is native to XP.
Maybe SP 2 does have SATA drivers (SP3 certainly does) but who knows what SP
of XP the person has. If the OP tries to install using XP Gold or SP1 on a
SATA drive the install will fail unless he puts the bios for the drive
controller in IDE mode (now granted it is not called that in the bios.)
I missed that. Where did the need for IDE mode come up? I didn't see it
mentioned and it's not an issue.

You have to

"Strip the hard drive" and installing XP from scratch INCLUDES, and starts
with, the deletion and re-creation of partitions if you wish to do so.
TAkes only seconds to do the partition work, and then wait for the formats
to be done. No problem at all.
Exactly what I said. You just used more words.
The disks have nothing to do with anything. As long as you have the same
version disk, ANY disk can be used. What matters is the COA code - THAT
is what's registered and kept track of at MS. You can borrow any like OS
disk to get things going as long as you use your own key. They know the
computer by its contents and no other way.
OK, you were really getting picky here. When the OP is installing XP he
needs a disk. Who cares where he gets it from. Yes it is the license that
can't be transferred with an OEM license.
If retail it can't be

A retail OS disk can be moved to any other computer you wish to use it on.
It's what distunguishes OEM from Retail, in fact. It does not however have
anything to do with the fact that you cannot install the OS in more than
one instance on more than one computer, including with Virtual machines.
That's true no matter what and always has been.
Again, I said the exact same thing but in a lot fewer words.
If a branded

Actually, not necessarily, but it's becoming more common.
I currently have 4 computers that have bios locked XP installation disks.
The oldest is a Dell 8500 that was first created when Windows ME came out.
I have recently found out that the XP OEM disk that Dell sent me for that
computer is bios locked to that computer as I recently tried to use that
disk on a Sony computer. Didn't work but the OEM Sony disk did. Same SP
level. Therefore, bios locked CDs have been common in the past. They are
not necessarily "becoming more common."

That's negligible compared to the problem of activation with the correct
COA. It doesn't care; if it's even the same computer but too many things
have been changed, you might have some hoops to jump thru to get it
activated. The algorithm they use is rather complex and AFAIK anyway,
still unknown in public.
I agree with that statement except who cares about the preceding paragraph.
It isn't pertinent to the point that with a bios locked disk the OP would
not be able to use it anyway.

Please, get your facts right before posting things such as this. You may
have meant well, but there were a lot of misleading things in your post.

HTH,

Twayne`
Seems like you were very misleading in your post, going off half cocked and
with the facts given by the OP I was right on in my comments on "What do I
need to do to get rid of Win 7 and put on XP Pro?"
 
T

Twayne

In
LVTravel said:
XP's disk won't have drivers for 2009-10 hardware. Where
would the "drivers are already present if they're needed"
You need to reread the previous para. XP/SP3 (or even 2) has
drivers for a LOT of objects, and simply being dated 09/10(1/4
of anyway) doesn't mean by any means that drivers aren't with
XP. It is true I should have said "may have" the drivers
needed, but I corrected that in the following sentence.
be located if not on the XP disk and as stated I really
don't think new hardware's drivers would be on a disk that
is more than 6 years older than the current hardware.
XP is XP and SP is SP; many drivers will still apply and if
not the cards may well have drivers available. If not, you get
them from the mfr's site; is that too complex for you?
Regardless I'd probably get a new set of drivers for them
anyway. The only drivers that really matter are going to be
the ones for the motherboard; chipset etc.. I haven't yet seen
mainline audio, video et al cards that would only run on 10.
It's just not in their best interests.
I
have a USB wireless network card that was sold after Vista
came out that doesn't have XP drivers available for it from
the manufacturer How would that particular device ever be
used with XP if it was an installed device in the OP's new
computer?
The exception that proves the rule. YOu're out to be a picky
bass turd so that's how you're being treated.
The OP says he wants information to "need to do to get rid
of Win 7" so my comment is correct. Doesn't want Win 7 so
a dual boot is not what the OP wants.
Yeah, it's sure crude to provide full information, isn't it?
It might well be a way for the OP to do an XP install without
putting his whole machine out of commision for the duration of
figuring out the install. Rather than assisting anything you
seem more bent of being negative and leaving out anything that
might be a beneficial piece of information.
Maybe SP 2 does have SATA drivers (SP3 certainly does)
SP2 does have them. In fact, I went back and checked and one
of my SP1 XP machines had SATA connectors on the mobo. And the
manual explains how to install a SATA device and even has
links to learn more about SATA.

but
who knows what SP of XP the person has.
"One" asks if it's relevant. I'd be willing to bet he's at SP2
minimum, best case SP3. SP1 versions are a real mess of
updates these days and such machines are seldom found. I find
a lot more win98 machines than I do XP SP1 machines. Remember
how quickly SP1 came out?

If the OP tries to
install using XP Gold or SP1 on a SATA drive the install
will fail unless he puts the bios for the drive controller
in IDE mode (now granted it is not called that in the
bios.)
Actually, it is called that, on my machine at least, and in
the SATA docs that accompanied the drives. But I suspect it
doesn't mean what you think it does.

But that's a load of hogwash in its scope and breadth.

As you have todo for a clean install of ANY operating system,
in fact.
Exactly what I said. You just used more words.
Not at all. Who knows what you mean by "strip"? There is no
need to "strip" anything; you just go ahead and boot from the
XP media, assuming you have it and it's not a media machine,
in which case you need a specific partitioning disk first.
OK, you were really getting picky here. When the OP is
installing XP he needs a disk. Who cares where he gets it
from. Yes it is the license that can't be transferred with
an OEM license.
Because if you try to use a Pro for a Home installation, it
will fail to activate unless you have a pirated code to use.
And if you try to use a Home for Home install, the same thing
happens; no activation possible.
Again, I said the exact same thing but in a lot fewer words.
NO, you said it "can't be currently installed onto any other
computer", whatever that means.
I currently have 4 computers that have bios locked XP
installation disks. The oldest is a Dell 8500 that was
first created when Windows ME came out. I have recently
found out that the XP OEM disk that Dell sent me for that
computer is bios locked to that computer as I recently
tried to use that disk on a Sony computer. Didn't work but
the OEM Sony disk did. Same SP level. Therefore, bios
locked CDs have been common in the past. They are not
necessarily "becoming more common."
But they arent necessarily locked. My last three Gateways all
came with OEM disk sets, but when those machines went belly
up, I used the XP install disk to do a clean install to
another computer. So I had to make a 5 minute phone call, big
deal. Never had a single problem. Those machines are still
running. I also have two win98 machines running well. Up to
date, stable and all updates saved to DVDs. In process of the
same with XP although I don't trust them to not issue a final
SP4 when all is done and said. But I"m at SP3 so it's not that
much data, really.
I agree with that statement except who cares about the
preceding paragraph. It isn't pertinent to the point that
with a bios locked disk the OP would not be able to use it
anyway.
But not all of them are "locked" as you describe. If it's an
actual XP install disk, then it's not locked at all. The XP
and win7 disks that came with this machine I'm typing on are
legitimate, unbastardized disks, too. I did a quick compare
of it and my previous XP disk and they are identical with the
exception that the latest one has SP3 on it. Usually it's
the Activation" that locks the computers, not the disk. Buy a
machine from one of the popular outlets like Tiger and see
what you get; they're legit XP OEM disks. I have a friend
that has bought & built three of them that way.
Seems like you were very misleading in your post, going off
half cocked and with the facts given by the OP I was right
on in my comments on "What do I need to do to get rid of
Win 7 and put on XP Pro?"
You were pretty half-fast and neglected several points plus
made vague references to things. I simply added some more
facts, useful or not to the OP I don't know, and could not
care less that you let your nose get out of joint. Many of
your sweeping statements only made it seem less likely the OP
could downgrade and you completely left out many things that
could have put a more positive spin on the distinct
possibilities.

Oh, did I forget to mention, I have done the "downgrade" to
two win7 machines and four Vista machines? Yes, I did the
homework first. We lucked out; but then I know to look first
for the chipset drivers and go from there, not just give it a
sweeping mass of why it can't or shouldn't be tried.

Now, since we're so off topic and in the way of the OP and any
actual help he may be able to get, I'm done conversing with
you over this silliness.

HTH,

Twayne`
 
D

db

this has been one of my
foremost criticisms' of
microsoft for not including
former desktop themes
with their newer o.s.

in any case, as a possible
solution for you,

you may want to shop
around for third party
programs that can
change a modern windows
desktop theme with an older
style theme while leaving the
current o.s./system in tact.

I think you can start at
a website called windows
blinds.

by the way, before trying out
or applying any third party
programs like themes
be sure to make a system
restore point before hand..
--

db·´¯`·...¸><)))º>
DatabaseBen, Retired Professional
- Systems Analyst
- Database Developer
- Accountancy
- Veteran of the Armed Forces
- Microsoft Partner
- @hotmail.com
~~~~~~~~~~"share the nirvana" - dbZen
 
S

smlunatick

I recently bought a laptop it has Windows 7 on it I dont like it. when I put
in the XP disc it said compatibility issues. What do I need to do to get rid
of Win 7 and put on XP Pro?
As with the other posts, besides finding the required XP drivers, you
need to also consult the warranty info. I have seen previous laptops
that had the warranty "not honoured" because it did not have the
version of Windows that was delivered with it.

BTW: You can not install XP from within Windows 7. Since Windows 7 is
much newer than XP, Windows 7 will not let you to downgrade to XP.
You must start the PC from the XP install CD.
 
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W

WhitePaw

LVTravel its very evident you have no clue what your talking about so please
quit giving bad advice. I am a pc tech of 17 years, and I have done plenty of
xp sp1 installs with sata. my own computers have sata, and I use a sp1 disk
every time to reinstall. Granted there basic ones, but that is common for
lots of hardware, and they work. Fact is SATA is not the issue at all of him
not being able to install, sounds to me the compatibility issue came up when
he/she tried to put the disk in WITH windows 7 running already instead of
booting from it. If he boots from disk, clears the old partition, and does a
clean install he/she is fine.

On a side note I too had windows 7 from beta, rc, and now full windows 7
pro, and after giving a throw chance before making my mind up I too went back
to xp.
 
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