DHCP Win2K Server problem.


J

Jason

Here goes:

We started with one DC (DC1) running DHCP in our domain. Installed
second DC (DC2)in same domain and configured with same scope. Once the
scope was configured i disabled the scope on DC1 and enabled the scope
on DC2. Once all the clients had released/renewed from new DHCP
server, the DHCP server on DC1 was unauthorized and finally
uninstalled. Now I am receiving DHCP errors on DC1 saying "The
DHCP/BINL service has determined that it is not authorized to service
clients on this network for our domain." I've verified that DHCP is
not installed and the DHCP server service is not present in the list
of services. Why would i still be getting an error like this?
 
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J

Jason

I don't want DHCP on that server anymore. I thought i took the proper
steps to remove it.
 
J

Jason

DHCP is now running on DC2. I have removed it from DC1 but am still
receiving the errors in the event log.
 
M

Marina Roos

Can you give us the exact errormessage and on which DC are you getting them?

Marina
 
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R

Roland Hall

I have seen this before, since NT, when you do not manually release the IP
address from all workstation prior to moving DHCP servers.

ipconfig /release ...
ipconfig /renew ...

I seem to remember they would eventually time out but based upon what the
DHCP scope had for lease expiration. Microsoft uses, or used to use, a
50/100 ratio. Default lease expiration on NT was 3 days by default so they
would renew at 50% of TTL or 1.5 days. However, they would still make a
request, AFAIK, to obtain the previous address but if it was taken, you
would get the next available address.

If the timeout has not occured and you're using a new DHCP server, then
until it does time out, the workstation will keep trying to go to the old
server unless you manually remove the IP address. If there is another way
to get around this issue, I'm not aware of it.

DHCP is now running on DC2. I have removed it from DC1 but am still
receiving the errors in the event log.
 
J

Jason

Thank you for the follow up. I had told everyone to do a manual
release/renew but of course i can't be sure that they did.
Are you saying that if I went to each computer and did a manual
release/renew that it may fix the problem? It's a small office so that
isn't much of a big deal.
Thanks again,
 
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R

Roland Hall

It may. I only moved the DHCP server once in an existing network. Trying
to solve the issue, I found I had to execute from the client to remove the
lease. I could delete it on the server but that doesn't affect the client
because it stores information, or appears to. Where else could it get it?

What if the DHCP server is down? Is it necessary to delete the information
from the client at that time? What if the DHCP server comes back up in a
couple of minutes. How does the client get the information from the server
now when it should already have it? You could argue that it should release
it and, as a reservation works, grab your existing lease when you can
connect. However, what if the server goes down and someone else creates a
DHCP scope somewhere else and it's not what you wanted to do? Could you
then now have the potential for corruption across your network?

What if the server cannot be reached by a particular client? When they
reboot, even though they have time left on their lease, and they are not
able to reach the DHCP server, can they not still have their IP address
assigned in their lease? There is no reason for the DHCP server to expire
the lease just because the client hasn't checked in. In fact, it won't
until the lease time is set to expire.

It looks like the whole thing needs some work but then that is a very loose
view from where I'm sitting.

This document may support my argument:

http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;167014&Product=win2000

Thank you for the follow up. I had told everyone to do a manual
release/renew but of course i can't be sure that they did.
Are you saying that if I went to each computer and did a manual
release/renew that it may fix the problem? It's a small office so that
isn't much of a big deal.
Thanks again,
 

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