Copying windows to another box and activating it


M

mm

Copying windows to another box and activating it?

Now I have been given an old Dell PC that is still a lot newer than my
current mobo, and it is licensed for XP-home, which I'm using now.

My plan (LOL) is to clone*** my XP partition and my data partition
onto a new, big HDD, and install that HDD as the primary drive (and
the only one at first) in the Dell PC (a Dimension 4700, fwiw).

***I would use Acronis True Image Home 2011 which has an accessory
program, the Plus Pack, that will install different drivers to work
with the different hardware.
http://www.acronis.com/homecomputing/products/trueimage/#plus-pack
AFAIK, this is the only backup/restore program that will restore to
different hardware.

But the Dell already has a windows license, so I don't want to keep
using the retail license in the C partition. I want to use the Dell
license (and keep my retail license working on my current computer
which will now be a backup computer.)

Googling, most hits are about people who installed either with a
volume license or a leaked license, but fwiw, that's not me.

Those pages say one must deactivate windows by going to the registry
key they specify and changing one character.

Then run msoobe.exe. ("Out Of Box Experience" LOL)

In my situation, will it be necessary to deactivate first?
Yes, right?

Do I have to run msoobe.exe or will it somehow magically know the
product key from the CMOS or something?
I have to run msoobe, right?

When I run msoobe, if I choose activate over the net (or the phone),
should it let me just enter the Dell Product Key?

And I'm done????

Am I skipping something big? :)


P.S. Right now on the current computer, when I click on msoobe.exe,
nothing happens afaict. Maybe that's because my XP is activated and
doesn't need activation??

(I was also going to copy the the win98 partition to a 3rd partition
on the new HDD and run that under MS Virtual Windows. There's no rush
about that, but it shoudl work, right?)

Thanks.
 
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M

mm

Copying windows to another box and activating it?

Now I have been given an old Dell PC that is still a lot newer than my
current mobo, and it is licensed for XP-home, which I'm using now.

My plan (LOL) is to clone*** my XP partition and my data partition
onto a new, big HDD, and install that HDD as the primary drive (and
the only one at first) in the Dell PC (a Dimension 4700, fwiw).
***I would use Acronis True Image Home 2011 which has an accessory
program, the Plus Pack, that will install different drivers to work
with the different hardware.
http://www.acronis.com/homecomputing/products/trueimage/#plus-pack
AFAIK, this is the only backup/restore program that will restore to
different hardware.

But the Dell already has a windows license, so I don't want to keep
using the retail license in the C partition. I want to use the Dell
license (and keep my retail license working on my current computer
which will now be a backup computer.)

Googling, most hits are about people who installed either with a
volume license or a leaked license, but fwiw, that's not me.

Those pages say one must deactivate windows by going to the registry
key they specify and changing one character.

Then run msoobe.exe. ("Out Of Box Experience" LOL)

On another page, I read about the Windows Product Key Update Tool
http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=50346&clcid=0x409

KeyUpdateTool_enu.exe

IIUC, this seems even simpler. Just run this and enter the Dell
25-character Product Key. It says you have to then activate windows,
but given that windows is activated for all the hardware except the
new HDD, maybe it won't even ask for that. At any rate, it will tell
me what to do then.

Is it going to be this simple?
 
P

philo

Copying windows to another box and activating it?

Now I have been given an old Dell PC that is still a lot newer than my
current mobo, and it is licensed for XP-home, which I'm using now.

My plan (LOL) is to clone*** my XP partition and my data partition
onto a new, big HDD, and install that HDD as the primary drive (and
the only one at first) in the Dell PC (a Dimension 4700, fwiw).


<snip>

nope

If you take XP from one machine...
due to the different hardware, it's not likely to even boot
if you put in on a second machine
 
M

mm

Unless they are identical machines. I replaced a motherboard once with
the exact same model and XP didn't even burp.

The OP does have two different machines and should clean install XP on
the new one.

But what about what it says here http://kb.acronis.com/content/13671

Acronis Universal Restore is a module that allows changing Windows
Hardware Abstraction Layer (HAL.dll) and install mass storage boot
device drivers into the system.

It installs boot device drivers (e.g. hard drive or RAID controller
drivers) into the system during the recovery process, so that the
operating system can boot from this boot device. If there are proper
NIC drivers present in the folder with the drivers, Acronis Universal
Restore will copy them into the restored system and will schedule
their installation on Windows boot-up.

(!) All the other drivers (e.g. video and sound card drivers, plug and
play drivers) are not installed by Acronis Universal Restore, as they
can be installed in Windows after the successful migration.

Acronis Universal Restore is applicable for:

* Instant recovery of a failed system on different hardware;
* Migration to a machine with dissimilar hardware;
* Real-to-virtual and virtual-to-real computer migration for
system recovery, testing and other purposes.
 
M

mm

Looks good. Go for it.

Thanks. It will be a few weeks before I can let you know how well it
works.

What did you think about the question in the original post, about
changing the XP Product Key from what will be on the clone of my
current computer to the Key that goes with the newer Dell?

Either 1) deactivating windows by going to the registry key they
specify and changing one character. Then running msoobe.exe.

On 2) running Windows Product Key Update Tool KeyUpdateTool_enu.exe
http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=50346&clcid=0x409


Two seems even simpler than One. Just run it and enter the Dell
25-character Product Key.

Is it going to be this simple?
 
D

Daave

mm said:
Thanks. It will be a few weeks before I can let you know how well it
works.

What did you think about the question in the original post, about
changing the XP Product Key from what will be on the clone of my
current computer to the Key that goes with the newer Dell?

Either 1) deactivating windows by going to the registry key they
specify and changing one character. Then running msoobe.exe.

On 2) running Windows Product Key Update Tool KeyUpdateTool_enu.exe
http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=50346&clcid=0x409


Two seems even simpler than One. Just run it and enter the Dell
25-character Product Key.

Is it going to be this simple?

I doubt very much it would work at first. The Dell key is OEM, which
won't work with a Retail license/type unless you edit the setupp.ini
file:

http://www.thetechguide.com/howto/setuppini.html

But I think a Clean Install using a Dell XP Home installation CD would
be preferable.
 
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B

BillW50

In
mm said:
But what about what it says here http://kb.acronis.com/content/13671

Acronis Universal Restore is a module that allows changing Windows
Hardware Abstraction Layer (HAL.dll) and install mass storage boot
device drivers into the system.

It installs boot device drivers (e.g. hard drive or RAID controller
drivers) into the system during the recovery process, so that the
operating system can boot from this boot device. If there are proper
NIC drivers present in the folder with the drivers, Acronis Universal
Restore will copy them into the restored system and will schedule
their installation on Windows boot-up.

(!) All the other drivers (e.g. video and sound card drivers, plug and
play drivers) are not installed by Acronis Universal Restore, as they
can be installed in Windows after the successful migration.

Acronis Universal Restore is applicable for:

* Instant recovery of a failed system on different hardware;
* Migration to a machine with dissimilar hardware;
* Real-to-virtual and virtual-to-real computer migration for
system recovery, testing and other purposes.

Don't forget about Paragon's Adaptive Restore. Might also be available
in Paragon's free versions, I am not sure. As it plugs in all of the
generic drivers, so the restore can run on any computer. And once you
boot up, Windows starts to find better drivers and starts to install
them on first boot.

I also have Acronis True Image. But Acronis Universal Restore requires
Acronis True Image Plus, which isn't cheap.
 
D

Don Phillipson

Thanks. It will be a few weeks before I can let you know how well it
works.

What did you think about the question in the original post, about
changing the XP Product Key from what will be on the clone of my
current computer to the Key that goes with the newer Dell?

If you use the Acronis clone app, you will not need to
input a new or old product key. (But you should later have
a look at it via / Control Panel / System..)
 
M

mm

If you use the Acronis clone app, you will not need to
input a new or old product key. (But you should later have
a look at it via / Control Panel / System..)

Aha. I see the number there now. I wouldn't have recognized it were
it not for the url that Daave posted.

And your answer sounds good. I just need to choose between Acronis
and Paragon, and buy more memory for the next computer.

Thanks, Don, and Alias and Daave.
 
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M

mm

In

Don't forget about Paragon's Adaptive Restore. Might also be available

I didn't know about this one at all. I will look. See below.
in Paragon's free versions, I am not sure. As it plugs in all of the
generic drivers, so the restore can run on any computer. And once you
boot up, Windows starts to find better drivers and starts to install
them on first boot.

I also have Acronis True Image. But Acronis Universal Restore requires
Acronis True Image Plus, which isn't cheap.

I must admit I was confused at the start, months ago, because of the
trial copy, and thought True Image Home was free and all I had to buy
was the Plus. But I'm not sure so I'll look and post soon.
Comparatively it was a lot for something that it says works on Win7
but will still somehow be obsolete by the next time I want to use it.

OTOH, hardware failure is always a possibility, can happen without
notice, and this would get me up and running again quickly in another
computer, so it's good to practice now. Taking backups that will ONLY
work on this computer or an identical one is only of limited value.


Here is what I found about Paragon Adaptive Restore:
http://blog.paragon-software.com/?p=237
"The first version of Adaptive Restore supported only Vista and
Windows 2008 operating systems due to use of a very simple adaptation
algorithm. ....Now Adaptive Restore supports modern Vista, Windows
2008, Windows 7 operating systems alongside with deprecated Windows
2000 and going out of date Windows XP/Windows 2003.

Adaptive Restore is intended to be both simple and comprehensive. It
usually doesn’t demand special attention or manual actions during the
operation set up, but informs you about any hardware without properly
installed drivers. Inexperienced users can completely rely on the
internal Adaptive Restore algorithm during the operation when others,
who feels themselves skilled enough, are able to change Adaptive
Restore behavior.

If you choose a simple scenario you will need only to pass a path to
the drivers’ repository in the program. There is no limit to amount of
these repositories; the program will scan them all while searching for
appropriate drivers. If the program fails it will ask you to provide a
path to another repository. The lack of this scenario is that you
cannot control which driver will be actually installed.

A long but detailed and interesting way to bring your system back on
rails is to use the advanced Adaptive Restore scenario. In this case
the program will provide you with additional Adaptive Restore
parameters and tuning. First of all in this scenario you can see all
the information about the hardware which drivers have to be installed
for in an easy to understand manner with device names.

Look at the list of found hardware. You can see properly configured
hardware, devices without drivers and absent hardware with installed
drivers for it." It continues with screen shots etc.

Also free evaluation copy. ??
http://www.paragon-software.com/business/adaptiverestore/download.html
You are to fill in all the fields below and then accept the Evaluation
Agreement to get an evaluation version of WinPE-based special
stand-alone solution - Adaptive Restore 2010. Your request will be
sent to us automatically. We'll consider it and contact you for
further details. All the provided information will remain strictly
confidential. -- This is what it asks on the first form. All the
fieldss are required, including phone number: "Title*:
First Name*:
Last Name*:
E-Mail Address*:
Company's Name*:
Country*:
State*
Language*:
Phone Number*:"

OTOH, http://www.paragon-software.com/home/brh/index.html
It seems for 30 dollars you can get Backup and Recovery 10 Home,
Download or in a box via Amazon for the same price.

which includes several things and "next generation of adaptive
restore: A powerful and unique technology that restores any version of
Windows (since Win2K) to completely different hardware by injecting
the required drivers crucial for a migration of this kind.
You can also recover the startup ability after an unsuccessful system
migration to a different hardware platform with 3-d party tool.
Smart Driver Injector: A powerful technology that makes the process of
adding new drivers (for P2P operations) smooth and easy.

Is it worth 30 dollars to not tell them your phone number?
Plus it includes "Comprehensive protection for systems and data:
* Backup & Recovery 10 Home is based on the latest proven backup
technology
* Support for any desktop Windows OS, including Windows 7
* Smart Backup Wizard helps you back up exactly what you need with
the best backup method
* Live backup technology allows you to create backup images
without rebooting your PC
* Selective Restore – no need to restore the entire image, you can
easily extract files and folders from a backup image
* Backup & Recovery 10 Home automates backup routines by
scheduling operations directly with a simple Backup Wizard
* DOS/Linux and WinPE 3.0 bootable recovery environments are
available on CD/DVD/Blu-ray or flash memory
* Support of all the latest hardware, Microsoft dynamic disks, GPT
disks, major virtual machines, and Apple Boot Camp configurations
* Fixes most common system boot problems"

Also
http://www.paragon-software.com/business/adaptiverestore/
 
M

mm

I also have Acronis True Image. But Acronis Universal Restore requires
Acronis True Image Plus, which isn't cheap.

I priced this months ago, but have forgotten.

Acronis talks about Family Pack: Back up 3 PCs and save 70 dollars.
Does that mean** I'll have to be buy more than one copy just for my
back up computer(s)? If so, I'll go back to using the free progrrams
I have for backup.

**Yes, I think so. 50 dollars for True Home Image 11, and 80 for
three copies. I didn't notice this in Paragon, but I wasn't looking
for it.

Plus for Plus Pack: $30. I thought it was 10 or 20 last year, but
I'm bad with numbers.

* Acronis True Image Plus Pack works with the Acronis® True Image™
Home 2011 standard edition, but not with the Acronis True Image
Netbook Edition or previous editions of Acronis True Image Home.

Maybe I should have bought it last year when iirc it did work with
free ATIH, or maybe it didn't even then, and that's why what I thought
was free expired in 30 days.


So, three questions I have to ask myself:
Rregardless of price, which one do I (or other people) think is
better, Aronis True Image Plus Pack, or Paragon Backup and Recovery 10
Home with Adaptive Restore???

Which one is better in general? And which one is better for what I
want, restoring to different hardware?

And does it change if price is considered, about 80 for Acronis and
afaict 30 for Paragon?
 
B

BillW50

In
mm said:
I priced this months ago, but have forgotten.

I seem to recall the Plus Pack costs around 70 bucks alone.
* Acronis True Image Plus Pack works with the Acronis® True ImageT
Home 2011 standard edition, but not with the Acronis True Image
Netbook Edition or previous editions of Acronis True Image Home.

I don't *think* you need Acronis True Image Home 2011 to use the Plus
Pack. Although I could be wrong.
So, three questions I have to ask myself:
Rregardless of price, which one do I (or other people) think is
better, Aronis True Image Plus Pack, or Paragon Backup and Recovery 10
Home with Adaptive Restore???

Which one is better in general? And which one is better for what I
want, restoring to different hardware?

And does it change if price is considered, about 80 for Acronis and
afaict 30 for Paragon?

Yeah I can't tell you. As I don't have the Plus Pack for one. And I
never tried Paragon's Adaptive Restore for anything yet. Although I can
tell you that Paragon's Adaptive Restore comes with some other of their
products. Like I have Paragon Drive Copy Pro v11 and it comes with it as
well.

I can also tell you that for Windows 2000/XP, Adaptive Restore requires
the Windows install disc to grab the generic drivers from what I have
read. Vista and Windows 7 it doesn't since they don't delete the generic
drivers like 2000/XP does after the install.
 
M

mm

In

I seem to recall the Plus Pack costs around 70 bucks alone.

Wow. I'm sure it wasnt' that high when I looked, but for some
companies there is a lot of pricing strategy out there. Different
prices at different times, high prices maybe so they can lower the
price with a package. Though somehow now that you say 70, 30 seems
cheap and I'm thinking 30 was what I saw last time too.

Sometimes I have low expectations of a restaurant or some grocery
food, but I eat there/it and it tastes great. The next time I have
high expectations and the same food is a disappointment. The time
after that, I have low expectations and it tastes great again.
I don't *think* you need Acronis True Image Home 2011 to use the Plus
Pack. Although I could be wrong.

I still think you do need it, but probably not if you buy the 70
dollar version of Plus Pack.
Yeah I can't tell you. As I don't have the Plus Pack for one. And I
never tried Paragon's Adaptive Restore for anything yet.

I didn't look for that long, but I coudlnt' find an online review for
either.

It seems not many people have used either of these. Or at least those
who have don't post about it. I thought columnists got all this
stuff free on condition they try it and write about it. Maybe it's
not a condition.
Although I can
tell you that Paragon's Adaptive Restore comes with some other of their
products. Like I have Paragon Drive Copy Pro v11 and it comes with it as
well.

Good to know. I don't know what I could use more than another. I'll
think about it.

Here's something about Drive Copy Pro v11.
http://www.paragon-software.com/home/dc-professional/features.html

Dissimilar hardware is the fifth item, an Update they call it. So
version 10 didnt' have it.

And here's a free 30-day trial version
http://www.softsea.com/review/Paragon-Drive-Copy-Pro.html that does
NOT mention it, probably doesn't include it. Probably because people
only need it once every few years and would just use the trial version
and never buy anything.
I can also tell you that for Windows 2000/XP, Adaptive Restore requires
the Windows install disc to grab the generic drivers from what I have
read.

Good to know. I have Install discs for both of these, so that
shouldn't be a problem. Paragon said that even if you don't have the
drivers when you start, it will stop and ask you for them, and you can
give as many locations as you want, different folders on the CD or
floppy, I presume that usually means. I think they have to be
unzipped of course, but since I have another computer -- I'll still
have the source computer for that matter -- and can burn CDs or write
floppies, that shouldn't be a problem.

Won't it also accept, instead of generic, the Dell specific drivers I
just downloaded from the Dell site?

Or are you talking about driving things in addition to those, like
maybe does some non-hardware need drivers?
Vista and Windows 7 it doesn't since they don't delete the generic
drivers like 2000/XP does after the install.

That's good! Is microsoft trying to be more cooperative with the
customer?
 
B

BillW50

In
mm said:
Wow. I'm sure it wasnt' that high when I looked, but for some
companies there is a lot of pricing strategy out there. Different
prices at different times, high prices maybe so they can lower the
price with a package. Though somehow now that you say 70, 30 seems
cheap and I'm thinking 30 was what I saw last time too.

I did some more checking and I guess the retail price is closer to 80
bucks actually. Newegg has it around 65 bucks and on eBay two are around
55 bucks.

My Acronis True Image Home 2011 box says on the back that the Plus
version has everything that the Home version has plus three more things.

1) Restore to Dissimilar Hardware

2) Dynamic Disk Support

3) WinPE support

Yet inside they say that the Plus is an add-on to the Home 2011 version.
I must admit, that sounds confusing.
Sometimes I have low expectations of a restaurant or some grocery
food, but I eat there/it and it tastes great. The next time I have
high expectations and the same food is a disappointment. The time
after that, I have low expectations and it tastes great again.

Oh yes! Although it is usually one cook that makes the difference. So
find out which cook was working when it was fabulous. Then find out
which days they are usually there. And it will probably be more
consistent.
I still think you do need it, but probably not if you buy the 70
dollar version of Plus Pack.

I am so confused at this point.
I didn't look for that long, but I coudlnt' find an online review for
either.

I have been looking for anybody using either for about a year. And I
haven't heard anything. There is nothing stopping me from trying it,
except I don't actually need it. Although I have enough computers and
spare hard drives that it would only cost me some time to find out.
It seems not many people have used either of these. Or at least those
who have don't post about it. I thought columnists got all this
stuff free on condition they try it and write about it. Maybe it's
not a condition.

Yeah well... I haven't heard anything either. We might be the first to
actually try it. ;-)
Good to know. I don't know what I could use more than another. I'll
think about it.

It is probably in three or more different Paragon packages at least.
Here's something about Drive Copy Pro v11.
http://www.paragon-software.com/home/dc-professional/features.html

Dissimilar hardware is the fifth item, an Update they call it. So
version 10 didnt' have it.

Paragon is funny about that. I think their Drive Copy is the first of a
version number and if a feature isn't ready yet, it won't have it. So
v10 probably doesn't of Drive Copy. And Paragon's SE (Special Edition)
versions are actually one version higher. Say Drive Copy SE v9 is really
the same as Drive Copy v10. Don't ask me why, just that I know they do
it that way.
And here's a free 30-day trial version
http://www.softsea.com/review/Paragon-Drive-Copy-Pro.html that does
NOT mention it, probably doesn't include it. Probably because people
only need it once every few years and would just use the trial version
and never buy anything.

Yes that makes sense to me.
Good to know. I have Install discs for both of these, so that
shouldn't be a problem. Paragon said that even if you don't have the
drivers when you start, it will stop and ask you for them, and you can
give as many locations as you want, different folders on the CD or
floppy, I presume that usually means. I think they have to be
unzipped of course, but since I have another computer -- I'll still
have the source computer for that matter -- and can burn CDs or write
floppies, that shouldn't be a problem.

Won't it also accept, instead of generic, the Dell specific drivers I
just downloaded from the Dell site?

Or are you talking about driving things in addition to those, like
maybe does some non-hardware need drivers?

Well my impression is that you can't take a hard drive with a Windows
install and pop the drive in something that has different chipsets and
drivers. As it will just usually lockup during boot if you try. Although
when you install Windows for the first time it doesn't matter since
Windows uses generic drivers. Performance-wise, these are not good, but
they work. And Windows wants to replace them as soon as it can with
something better.

What I gather from Adaptive Restore (Paragon) and Universal Restore
(Acronis True Image) is they plug the generic drivers back in once
again. So it works with any PC hardware. And Windows the first chance
that it gets wants to replace them all. Just like when you first install
Windows for the first time, the same thing. The only difference is all
of your applications and data will be there. ;-)
That's good! Is microsoft trying to be more cooperative with the
customer?

Well maybe. Although I think they are really trying to make things
easier for them IMHO. ;-)
 
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M

mm

In

I did some more checking and I guess the retail price is closer to 80
bucks actually. Newegg has it around 65 bucks and on eBay two are around
55 bucks.

Good to know.
My Acronis True Image Home 2011 box says on the back that the Plus
version has everything that the Home version has plus three more things.

1) Restore to Dissimilar Hardware

2) Dynamic Disk Support

3) WinPE support

Yet inside they say that the Plus is an add-on to the Home 2011 version.
I must admit, that sounds confusing.

Definitely. I found ATIH for 50 dollars but you had to buy the Plus
Pack for 30. The ones you found for 80, 65, and maybe 55 probalby
include the Plus Pack. Althouh you never know. At one of the
surplus/close out stores around here thay had a compact Kodak digital
camera reconditioned for 50 dollars. But they only had one left that
had all the accessories meant to be included, and my friend and I
wanted one. I looked online and they ranged from 50 to 200 dollars
for reconditioned, while at the same time selling new ones for 100
dolllars. Can you imagine paying 200 for recon and then finding out
you could have new for 100!
Oh yes! Although it is usually one cook that makes the difference. So
find out which cook was working when it was fabulous. Then find out
which days they are usually there. And it will probably be more
consistent.

That can happen too.
This should have had a smiley.
I am so confused at this point.

Me too.
I have been looking for anybody using either for about a year. And I
haven't heard anything.

Then *I* will stop looking. :)
There is nothing stopping me from trying it,
except I don't actually need it. Although I have enough computers and
spare hard drives that it would only cost me some time to find out.

Well it will still probably take me months to get organized, but I do
have a need. And if it doesn't work, I won't be any worse off. If
it does work, I would like it to go fairly smmothly/quickly so I can
have all my email and newsgroups moved and won't have to do computer
work on the original computer, but if worst comes to worst, I'll copy
the partitions again, winxp and data, and start from the beginning.

Or, it occurs to me just now, maybe just the files that relate to
Agent and Eudora. Those are all data files anyhow, in the data
partition. Those would take only a few minutes. My Doocuments and
Settings is still in the XP partition and I end up using it sometimes,
but Agent and Eudora, which were written for win3.1, don't have to use
them.

For partition back up, I"m using XXCLone, which has a free version
that only allows full backups, nothing incremental. Within the next
day or two, I'm going to test if these clones are really bootable, for
me, as they are for other users, the author says. He also has a free
program XXCOPY, which copies individulal files, and can copy every
file changed since the last xxcopy, using not the attribute byte but
the date and time. So IIUC, if the move to the new computer doesn't
work the firs time, I can use XXCOPY to update the cloned copy,
changing only the files that have changed. Or maybe there is
something in Acronis or Paragon, one of which I will have bought by
then. But I must say that I like XXCOPY. It has loads of switches,
including /clone, lots of report versatility, and a very simple
interface. A dos box, just like using xcopy. And as I may have
mentioned in months past, a Yahoo group to ask questions on, often
with answers by the author.
Yeah well... I haven't heard anything either. We might be the first to
actually try it. ;-)

Maybe. Maybe people buy it but never use it!
It is probably in three or more different Paragon packages at least.


Paragon is funny about that. I think their Drive Copy is the first of a
version number and if a feature isn't ready yet, it won't have it. So
v10 probably doesn't of Drive Copy. And Paragon's SE (Special Edition)
versions are actually one version higher. Say Drive Copy SE v9 is really
the same as Drive Copy v10. Don't ask me why, just that I know they do
it that way.

Now I'm confused, but don't bother to unconfuse me.
Yes that makes sense to me.


Well my impression is that you can't take a hard drive with a Windows
install and pop the drive in something that has different chipsets and
drivers.

Right. That's the whole problem. And yeah, so you do mean hardware
drivers (the only kind there is afaik) Chipset is one of the Dell
drivers, available online, and it does relate to hardware of course.
and fwiw people on the Dell group keep saying it has to be installed
first. I'm sure both of these programs install it first if that
matters in this case.
As it will just usually lockup during boot if you try. Although
when you install Windows for the first time it doesn't matter since
Windows uses generic drivers. Performance-wise, these are not good, but
they work. And Windows wants to replace them as soon as it can with
something better.

Fair enough.
What I gather from Adaptive Restore (Paragon) and Universal Restore
(Acronis True Image) is they plug the generic drivers back in once
again.

Now I'm confused between the two products, because one said you could
choose a set of drivers and provide only those, so that would mean I
could dl and unzip all the Dell drivers. (Although there is more to
unzipping them, it seems. After unzipping, I have to use Setup, that
is included with each driver, to install them. But maybe the driver
itself is in the unzipped file. I'll have to check, but they are on
the computer in the basement. (I got the feeling you could offer it
one small set of drivers, and if it didnt' find what it needed, it
would ask again for more.)

WRT to the other program, I forget which, something said that it would
take the first acceptable driver it found and you couldn't decide
which was first.

But as you point out above and below, it doesn't really matter,
because you can load better ones later in either case.
So it works with any PC hardware. And Windows the first chance
that it gets wants to replace them all. Just like when you first install
Windows for the first time, the same thing.

Yes, I've seen that. I knew there was a reason for paying attention!
The only difference is all
of your applications and data will be there. ;-)

I hope so. I would have a hard time finding all the software I need
to install everything that is there now, although I'm more organized
than I was between win98 and winXP. Or 3.1 to 87.

IF somehow one program doesn't work, I will probably even buy the
other one two. But most likely they both would work, so I'm
considering the value to me of the other things that come with it,
etc.
Well maybe. Although I think they are really trying to make things
easier for them IMHO. ;-)

Probably.

Thanks a lot.
 

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