Character-type styles remove previous direct formatting


W

wildetudor

When I apply to a selection of text a style which is of the type Character,
it seems to overwrite any formatting which was done directly to that
selection.

For example, if I have a word underlined in my selection, and I apply a
Character style which implies making the text blue, then the selection
becomes blue AND the word's underlining disappears.

Is it not possible for a style to just *add* formatting to a selection,
without also removing previous direct formatting?
 
Ad

Advertisements

D

DeanH

Modify the Character style's "Style based on" property to "(Underlying
properties)".
This will allow you to add the Blue font and keep the Underline, but if the
text is green (say) this will be overridden by the Blue of the Character
style.
Hope this helps
DeanH
 
W

wildetudor

Thanks very much, it indeed did help.

DeanH said:
Modify the Character style's "Style based on" property to "(Underlying
properties)".
This will allow you to add the Blue font and keep the Underline, but if the
text is green (say) this will be overridden by the Blue of the Character
style.
Hope this helps
DeanH
 
W

wildetudor

Thanks for your help again DeanH, I only now had time to try what you
suggested, and it seems the style, even if based on 'underlying properties',
still overrides direct formatting which is non-conflictual with the style
definition, i.e. style is only supposed to color text in blue, but it
actually also removes previously existing word underlinings.. Is there
anything else I can try?
 
S

Suzanne S. Barnhill

"Underlying properties" is actually the same thing as Default Paragraph
Font, which would not include any direct formatting that had been applied to
the text, so your character styles are behaving as designed.
 
W

wildetudor

So I guess the answer to my question is 'no'?...

Suzanne S. Barnhill said:
"Underlying properties" is actually the same thing as Default Paragraph
Font, which would not include any direct formatting that had been applied to
the text, so your character styles are behaving as designed.

--
Suzanne S. Barnhill
Microsoft MVP (Word)
Words into Type
Fairhope, Alabama USA
 
Ad

Advertisements


Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top