Can't Connect! Beat-up Machine.


N

Nehmo

Here's the problem gang. My wife took a bunch of Klonopin and
physically destroyed a computer. It has a Shuttle AN35N Ultra board and
I'm running Windows XP Home SP1. After replacing a damaged processor
fan and re-connecting everything, I'm getting Windows up and running
and everything is functioning except I can't connect to the internet.


I have a cable connection and I can successfully connect with another
computer. When I plug in the RJ-45 on the broken machine (on board
network stuff) and I go to Network Connections, I see one entry, Local
Area Connection 5 ...Enabled...NVIDIA nForce MCP Networking Controller.
Checking the Status > General tab > is says Connected, but with zero
Received. The Support tab shows IP Address 169.254.190.167, this means
(I think) Windows doesn't see the modem. Clicking on Repair
accomplishes nothing, Renewing the IP address failed.

Windows detects when the network cable is plugged or unplugged.

I tried a new cable, but as I said, I can connect with another machine.

The RoadRunner support tech suggested a NIC card or install the drivers
for the USB modem connecter and use a USB cable. I tried both, but
still nothing.

I'm using a USB mouse and keyboard on the machine, so the USB ports
are working.
What's my next step?
 
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G

Guest

I assume you have the coax cable, RJ45, power all connected to the modem,
with the other end of the RJ45 connected to the NIC/computer, right..? Is the
modem seen in device manager..? Do you have the cable provider's installation
CD handy, it should find the modem for you, ie.. set it up for you to access
the internet..
I just set up a buddy with Comcast and it was a snap.. The cable modem came
with a setup/or driver CD too, didn't use or need it though w/XP..
j;-j
 
G

George Schloicka

You could try setting up you internet connection again. Also check your fire
walls.
 
H

HDRDTD

What's the IP Addess of the computer you can connect to? Or do you mean the
other computer can connect to the internet?

Anytime your PC appears to have the 169.254.190.167 address, it usually
means it's configure to automatically get an IP address from a DHCP server
somewhere (rather than use a static IP address), but it can't find a DHCP
server, so it gives up and uses the 169 address.
 
N

Nehmo

Jaymon said:
I assume you have the coax cable, RJ45, power all connected to the modem,
with the other end of the RJ45 connected to the NIC/computer, right..? Is the
modem seen in device manager..? Do you have the cable provider's installation
CD handy, it should find the modem for you, ie.. set it up for you to access
the internet..
I just set up a buddy with Comcast and it was a snap.. The cable modem came
with a setup/or driver CD too, didn't use or need it though w/XP..
j;-j

There's no Modems in Device Manager. but in the other computer, a
laptop, with which I can connect, the only modem is AC97 Data Fax
SoftModem with SmartCP. That doesn't look like the cable modem, which
is a Scientific Atlanta. Is the cable modem supposed to show in device
manager?

With RoadRunner, I've never set up an account. You just connect the
computer, and you're on.

The cabeling is in order. I can connect the RJ45 jack to another
computer and it works.
 
B

Bob

The RoadRunner setup only allows one IP address.
What you need to do is the following to reset the modem to your machine.
First turn off your computer and unplug the power from the modem. Unplugging
the modem is important.
Next wait a few seconds and plug the power back into the modem and wait
until the modem lights show it synced.
Then turn on your computer. It should now be working.
 
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N

Nehmo

HDRDTD said:
What's the IP Addess of the computer you can connect to? Or do you mean the
other computer can connect to the internet?

Anytime your PC appears to have the 169.254.190.167 address, it usually
means it's configure to automatically get an IP address from a DHCP server
somewhere (rather than use a static IP address), but it can't find a DHCP
server, so it gives up and uses the 169 address.


One computer can connect to the internet and does so normally. The two
computers don 't connect to eachother. The ipconfig of the
non-connecting machine is : Media disconnected. Below is the ipconfig
of the machine that connects to the internet.

Microsoft Windows XP [Version 5.1.2600]
(C) Copyright 1985-2001 Microsoft Corp.

C:\Documents and Settings\Nehmo Sergheyev>ipconfig

Windows IP Configuration


Ethernet adapter Wireless Network Connection 2:

Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected

Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . : kc.rr.com
IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 69.23.123.72
Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.248.0
Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 69.23.120.1

C:\Documents and Settings\Nehmo Sergheyev>
 
H

HDRDTD

Do you have any kind of router installed between the modem and the PC's to
allow you to use more than one PC at the same time by any chance?


Nehmo said:
What's the IP Addess of the computer you can connect to? Or do you mean
the
other computer can connect to the internet?

Anytime your PC appears to have the 169.254.190.167 address, it usually
means it's configure to automatically get an IP address from a DHCP
server
somewhere (rather than use a static IP address), but it can't find a DHCP
server, so it gives up and uses the 169 address.


One computer can connect to the internet and does so normally. The two
computers don 't connect to eachother. The ipconfig of the
non-connecting machine is : Media disconnected. Below is the ipconfig
of the machine that connects to the internet.

Microsoft Windows XP [Version 5.1.2600]
(C) Copyright 1985-2001 Microsoft Corp.

C:\Documents and Settings\Nehmo Sergheyev>ipconfig

Windows IP Configuration


Ethernet adapter Wireless Network Connection 2:

Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected

Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . : kc.rr.com
IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 69.23.123.72
Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.248.0
Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 69.23.120.1

C:\Documents and Settings\Nehmo Sergheyev>
 
N

Nehmo

Bob said:
The RoadRunner setup only allows one IP address.
What you need to do is the following to reset the modem to your machine.
First turn off your computer and unplug the power from the modem. Unplugging
the modem is important.
Next wait a few seconds and plug the power back into the modem and wait
until the modem lights show it synced.
Then turn on your computer. It should now be working.

I just tried that again. It doesn't improve things. I'm still not
connected to the internet on that machine. However, the Status of the
connection is Enabled.

When I go to Start > Connect to > Roadrunner, after the dialog, I get,
Error connecting to RoadRunner, Error 678, Remote computer failed to
respond. There's a more info button, but nothing seeems to apply.
 
N

Nehmo

HDRDTD said:
Do you have any kind of router installed between the modem and the PC's to
allow you to use more than one PC at the same time by any chance?


No router. I'm moving the end of the RJ-45 cable from one computer to
the other. This one connects to the internet.
 
N

Nehmo

George said:
You could try setting up you internet connection again. Also check your fire
walls.

I was using XPs ICF for a firewall. I have it turned off.

Nehmo
 
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N

Nehmo

When I go to Start > Connect to > Roadrunner, after the dialog, I get,
Error connecting to RoadRunner, Error 678, Remote computer failed to
respond. There's a more info button, but nothing seeems to apply.

Apparently, that's not the way to connect anyway. That's through a WAN
Miniport (PPPCE). The Local Area Connection 5 is the one to the cable
modem.
 
H

HDRDTD

OK,

Usually on the back of the system, where the network cable plugs in, there
are a couple of little leds. They may be part of the jack the cable plugs
into.

One of the led's is normally green and will be lit solid if/when the network
cable is plugged in, indicating it has established a connection to something
at the other end.
Does the green led light up?

second, there is usually another led typically orange. Thi sled will flash
on and off whenever network traffic is flowing.

If the led's don't light up, then you have a very basic problem. The cable
and modem must be good because they work with th eother system, so that
leaves a faulty network adapter. If that's the case, you can buy a simple
network adapter at your local store.

If the green led lights up, then you can try this.

Open a Command Prompt window and type in...

ipconfig /release <enter> or perhaps ipconfig /release_all

This should eliminate the current IP address

Then type in...

ipconfig /renew <enter> or perhaps ipconfig /renew_all

If you're system is set to use DHCP to get an IP address automatically, this
should force the system to go out, find a DHCP server somewhere and get an
IP address from it.

If it returns an IP address similar or the same as the system that works
rather than the 169.x.x.x address, you should be good to go.


Do you know if the system that works is set up to use DHCP or to use a
static IP address??
 
N

Nehmo

HDRDTD said:
OK,

Usually on the back of the system, where the network cable plugs in, there
are a couple of little leds. They may be part of the jack the cable plugs
into.

One of the led's is normally green and will be lit solid if/when the network
cable is plugged in, indicating it has established a connection to something
at the other end.
Does the green led light up?


The green is constant on and the amber flashes, on the non-connecting
problem computer. On the connecting computer, the green is on and the
amber is off.
second, there is usually another led typically orange. Thi sled will flash
on and off whenever network traffic is flowing.

If the led's don't light up, then you have a very basic problem. The cable
and modem must be good because they work with th eother system, so that
leaves a faulty network adapter. If that's the case, you can buy a simple
network adapter at your local store.

If the green led lights up, then you can try this.

Open a Command Prompt window and type in...

ipconfig /release <enter> or perhaps ipconfig /release_all

This should eliminate the current IP address

Then type in...

ipconfig /renew <enter> or perhaps ipconfig /renew_all

If you're system is set to use DHCP to get an IP address automatically, this
should force the system to go out, find a DHCP server somewhere and get an
IP address from it.

If it returns an IP address similar or the same as the system that works
rather than the 169.x.x.x address, you should be good to go.


After the /renew, I get
Windows IP Configuration
An error occured while renewing interface Local Area Connection 5 :
unable to contact your DHCP server. Request has timed out.
Do you know if the system that works is set up to use DHCP or to use a
static IP address??

It's not a static addres. It's just a regular RoadRuner line.
 
H

HDRDTD

Nehmo said:
The green is constant on and the amber flashes, on the non-connecting
problem computer. On the connecting computer, the green is on and the
amber is off.


After the /renew, I get
Windows IP Configuration
An error occured while renewing interface Local Area Connection 5 :
unable to contact your DHCP server. Request has timed out.


It's not a static addres. It's just a regular RoadRuner line.

When referring to IP address, the IP address can be either obtained
automatically from what they call a DHCP (dynamic host configuration
protocol) server, or you manually assign a specific (static) IP address to
the system.

On the system that works, open a Command Prompt window and type in
ipconfig /all <enter>

partway down the list, you should run across a line that says
DHCP Enabled yes
or
DHCP Enabled no

what does it say?
 
N

Nehmo

HDRDTD said:
When referring to IP address, the IP address can be either obtained
automatically from what they call a DHCP (dynamic host configuration
protocol) server, or you manually assign a specific (static) IP address to
the system.

On the system that works, open a Command Prompt window and type in
ipconfig /all <enter>

partway down the list, you should run across a line that says
DHCP Enabled yes
or
DHCP Enabled no

what does it say?

Yes.
 
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D

David Vair

If you are just moving the cable from one to the other you need to physcially turn off the modem
when you do the switch. You are assigned 1 IP address from the cable company, this is done in
association of the MAC address of the NIC card itself. By turning off and then on the modem it will
give the IP to the machine that is connected at the time.
 
G

Guest

Well, after I set my buddies cable modem up and installed the cable providers
setup software, I needed my buds cable bill so as to input the account #..
After the verification process was complete, we were on the internet.. The
cable provider turned on the service from their end for his existing account
prior to our installation attempt, my buddy also paid for an install KIT
($40) from the cable provider which included the modem, setup disks, cables,
etc..
Perhaps you need to verify with Roadrunner that High Speed Internet access
is indeed provided or has been turned on for your service package..?
j;-j
 
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H

HDRDTD

has this system EVER worked when connected to your cable modem?

Is there any possibility that the cable modem is looking for a PC with a
specific MAC address???
 

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