can the processor in this system be upgraded?


T

Trevor Smithson

Hi everyone

I figure if I can up the processor in this system to about 1.5Ghz I
can get another couple years use out of it...here is the info from
Everest. I'd appreciate if someone could tell me if the processor can
be upgraded, and if so what is the max speed. Thanks.


CPU:

CPU Properties:
CPU Type Intel Celeron II, 766 MHz (11.5 x 67)
CPU Alias Celeron III, Coppermine Lite, Coppermine-128
CPU Stepping cC0
Instruction Set x86, MMX, SSE
Original Clock 766 MHz
L1 Code Cache 16 KB
L1 Data Cache 16 KB
L2 Cache 128 KB (On-Die, ATC, Full-Speed)

CPU Physical Info:
Package Type 370 Pin FC-PGA
Package Size 4.95 cm x 4.95 cm
Transistors 28.1 million
Process Technology 6M, 0.18 um, CMOS
Die Size 90 mm2
Core Voltage 1.70 V
I/O Voltage 3.3 V
Typical Power 9 - 22 W (depending on clock speed)
Maximum Power 14.0 - 33.0 W (depending on clock speed)




Motherboard:

Motherboard Properties:
Motherboard ID <DMI>
Motherboard Name Compaq Presario

Front Side Bus Properties:
Bus Type Intel GTL+
Bus Width 64-bit
Real Clock 67 MHz
Effective Clock 67 MHz
Bandwidth 533 MB/s

Chipset Bus Properties:
Bus Type Intel Hub Interface
Bus Width 8-bit





Chipset:


North Bridge Properties:
North Bridge Intel Whitney i810E
Revision 03
Package Type 421 Pin BGA
Package Size 3.1 cm x 3.1 cm
Core Voltage 1.8 V
In-Order Queue Depth 4

Memory Timings:
CAS Latency (CL) 2T
RAS To CAS Delay (tRCD) 2T
RAS Precharge (tRP) 2T
RAS Active Time (tRAS) 5T
Row Cycle Time (tRC) 7T

Memory Slots:
DRAM Slot #1 256 MB (SDRAM)
DRAM Slot #2 256 MB (SDRAM)

Integrated Graphics Controller:
Graphics Controller Type Intel i752
Graphics Controller Status Enabled
Shared Memory Size 1 MB
 
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D

David Maynard

Trevor said:
Hi everyone

I figure if I can up the processor in this system to about 1.5Ghz I
can get another couple years use out of it...here is the info from
Everest. I'd appreciate if someone could tell me if the processor can
be upgraded, and if so what is the max speed. Thanks.

Really need to know which model Compaq that is but the 810E chipset should
be able to use just about any coppermine CPU, either Celeron or P-III, but
you're not going to get 1.5 gig.

A P-III would be about 25% faster than a same speed Celeron because of the
larger cache. If you went to a 133 MHz FSB P-III, however, you might need
to change RAM too (if it's PC100, which is likely with a 766 celeron in
there). While not absolutely necessary, you really should change to PC133
even if using a 100 MHz FSB P-III, or Celeron (those >= 800MHz) as having
memory faster than the FSB helps compensate for the shared memory video.
(with a 766 MHz Celeron you're at the top end for keeping the existing
PC100 RAM)

There's a chance you could use the Tualatin Celerons (same performance as
the P-III) with an adapter. They go to 1.4 gig, on 100 MHz FSB, but I'd
stick with 1.3 gig, or less, to keep from overloading the voltage
regulators so much. You need to check the adapter's compatibility list
against the Compaq model number to see if it'll work, though.
 
T

Trevor Smithson

David,

Thanks much for your quick reply.

Here's my memory type, again according to Everest:

SPD Memory Modules:
DIMM1: Micron Tech. 16LSDT3264AG-133E1 256 MB PC133 SDRAM
(3.0-3-3-6 @ 133 MHz) (2.0-2-2-5 @ 100 MHz)
DIMM2 256 MB PC133 SDRAM (3.0-3-3-6 @ 133 MHz) (2.0-2-2-5 @ 100
MHz)

Also, the Compaq model number is Preasrio 5000.

So, given that what would you recommend?

Thanks again!
 
T

Trevor Smithson

David,

Thanks much for your quick reply.

Here's my memory type, again according to Everest:

SPD Memory Modules:
DIMM1: Micron Tech. 16LSDT3264AG-133E1 256 MB PC133 SDRAM
(3.0-3-3-6 @ 133 MHz) (2.0-2-2-5 @ 100 MHz)
DIMM2 256 MB PC133 SDRAM (3.0-3-3-6 @ 133 MHz) (2.0-2-2-5 @ 100
MHz)

Also, the Compaq model number is Preasrio 5000.

Ignore that, the actual model number is 5006US.
 
D

David Maynard

Trevor said:
David,

Thanks much for your quick reply.

Here's my memory type, again according to Everest:

SPD Memory Modules:
DIMM1: Micron Tech. 16LSDT3264AG-133E1 256 MB PC133 SDRAM
(3.0-3-3-6 @ 133 MHz) (2.0-2-2-5 @ 100 MHz)
DIMM2 256 MB PC133 SDRAM (3.0-3-3-6 @ 133 MHz) (2.0-2-2-5 @ 100
MHz)

That's good news.
Also, the Compaq model number is Preasrio 5000.

"Presario 5000" is not a model number, per see. It's a 'class' of Compaq
computer and there's over 100 'Presario 5000' models (not counting 'options').

You need to find the ID tag that has the actual model number (like 5000T,
or 5010US, or 5080US, or whatever)

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/...&cc=us&product=92873&dlc=en&docname=c00004461

This is an example of the adapter and they have a compatibility list.

http://www.upgradeware.com/english/product/370gu/370gu.htm

I would, and did, buy an el-cheapo clone for like 5 bucks, though, since
they're the same thing. Such as this one
http://www.hardwarecooling.com/product_info.php/products_id/199
 
T

Trevor Smithson

That's good news.




"Presario 5000" is not a model number, per see. It's a 'class' of Compaq
computer and there's over 100 'Presario 5000' models (not counting 'options').

See my previous reply...

Also, I've done some more research, and the FSB can be altered by
changing jumpers around; it can be changed to 100 or 133mhz.

Does this change anything you recommended?

Thanks again
 
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S

sbb78247

Trevor said:
Hi everyone

I figure if I can up the processor in this system to about 1.5Ghz I
can get another couple years use out of it...here is the info from
Everest. I'd appreciate if someone could tell me if the processor can
be upgraded, and if so what is the max speed. Thanks.


CPU:

CPU Properties:
CPU Type Intel Celeron II, 766 MHz (11.5 x 67)
CPU Alias Celeron III, Coppermine Lite, Coppermine-128
CPU Stepping cC0
Instruction Set x86, MMX, SSE
Original Clock 766 MHz
L1 Code Cache 16 KB
L1 Data Cache 16 KB
L2 Cache 128 KB (On-Die, ATC, Full-Speed)

CPU Physical Info:
Package Type 370 Pin FC-PGA
Package Size 4.95 cm x 4.95 cm
Transistors 28.1 million
Process Technology 6M, 0.18 um, CMOS
Die Size 90 mm2
Core Voltage 1.70 V
I/O Voltage 3.3 V
Typical Power 9 - 22 W (depending on clock speed)
Maximum Power 14.0 - 33.0 W (depending on clock speed)




Motherboard:

Motherboard Properties:
Motherboard ID <DMI>
Motherboard Name Compaq Presario

Front Side Bus Properties:
Bus Type Intel GTL+
Bus Width 64-bit
Real Clock 67 MHz
Effective Clock 67 MHz
Bandwidth 533 MB/s

Chipset Bus Properties:
Bus Type Intel Hub Interface
Bus Width 8-bit





Chipset:


North Bridge Properties:
North Bridge Intel Whitney i810E
Revision 03
Package Type 421 Pin BGA
Package Size 3.1 cm x 3.1 cm
Core Voltage 1.8 V
In-Order Queue Depth 4

Memory Timings:
CAS Latency (CL) 2T
RAS To CAS Delay (tRCD) 2T
RAS Precharge (tRP) 2T
RAS Active Time (tRAS) 5T
Row Cycle Time (tRC) 7T

Memory Slots:
DRAM Slot #1 256 MB (SDRAM)
DRAM Slot #2 256 MB (SDRAM)

Integrated Graphics Controller:
Graphics Controller Type Intel i752
Graphics Controller Status Enabled
Shared Memory Size 1 MB

get a p3 as fast as you can find and drop it in. otherwise money might be
more wisely spent on a new mobo/cpu/ram combination
 
D

David Maynard

Trevor said:
See my previous reply...

I already did.

That one is not on their compatibility list but odds are a tualatin (best
price is the 1.2 gig, especially since it's retail and comes with the
heatsink) would work with the adapter since it's known to work with other
810E boards (there are also 810E boards that natively support tualatins).
Depends on how much risk one is willing to take, though. I'd try the 1.2
gig tualatin, since this is the board's last hurrah, but then I have a
number of systems so I wouldn't be out anything even if it didn't work. I'd
just swap things around but you probably don't have that luxury.

As I previously posted, the next best alternate is a P-III, say 1 gig
(depending on how much you want to spend. The 866 is cheapest with 933 next
and 1 gig the most pricey of all the choices). There's no list to prove
they work either but at least they're coppermines, meaning no adapter
needed, so there's less risk than the tualatin. An Intel CA810E
'officially' supports P-IIIs up to 1 gig so if Compaq did a standard design
it should as well.

The upper end coppermine celerons are about the same risk as a P-III, just
as expensive, and don't provide enough bang over the 766 you've already got
to be worth it.

So "cheap and safe" is the P-III 866, about a 41% performance increase (13%
clock and 25% P-III/FSB), with "best bang for the buck, if it works," the
1.2 gig tualatin, about a 95% performance increase (57% clock and 25%
tualatin/FSB).

Note, the performance increase doesn't mean the whole system is that much
faster, just the processor.

Check with www.pricewatch.com for suppliers.
Also, I've done some more research, and the FSB can be altered by
changing jumpers around; it can be changed to 100 or 133mhz.

Does this change anything you recommended?


Makes no difference.
 
T

Trevor Smithson

I already did.

That one is not on their compatibility list but odds are a tualatin (best
price is the 1.2 gig, especially since it's retail and comes with the
heatsink) would work with the adapter since it's known to work with other
810E boards (there are also 810E boards that natively support tualatins).
Depends on how much risk one is willing to take, though. I'd try the 1.2
gig tualatin, since this is the board's last hurrah, but then I have a
number of systems so I wouldn't be out anything even if it didn't work. I'd
just swap things around but you probably don't have that luxury.

Well I have an even older system that'll work as a backup if I somehow
fry this system. I'm going to buy from a seller that will return
whatever I buy in case it doesn't work, even if they're a bit more
expensive.
As I previously posted, the next best alternate is a P-III, say 1 gig
(depending on how much you want to spend. The 866 is cheapest with 933 next
and 1 gig the most pricey of all the choices). There's no list to prove
they work either but at least they're coppermines, meaning no adapter
needed, so there's less risk than the tualatin. An Intel CA810E
'officially' supports P-IIIs up to 1 gig so if Compaq did a standard design
it should as well.

The upper end coppermine celerons are about the same risk as a P-III, just
as expensive, and don't provide enough bang over the 766 you've already got
to be worth it.

So "cheap and safe" is the P-III 866, about a 41% performance increase (13%
clock and 25% P-III/FSB), with "best bang for the buck, if it works," the
1.2 gig tualatin, about a 95% performance increase (57% clock and 25%
tualatin/FSB).

I'm going to go for a 1.2 or 1.3Ghz Tualatin. A 95% processor speed
increase would be meet my needs as far as performance and price go.
Memory, hard drive, and network speeds are all fine; the system is
definitely processor-bound (I've been doing some video editing, with a
766Mhz Celeron it's pretty slow...)
Note, the performance increase doesn't mean the whole system is that much
faster, just the processor.
Right.

Check with www.pricewatch.com for suppliers.

Will do. I don't suppose you have any direct experience changing the
FSB clock on a Compaq 5006US? This webpage:

http://www.igs.net/~ndaines/Qfiles/bmw-r.html

says it can be done; the board looks identical or at least very
similar to mine, but I'm having trouble identifying the three jumpers.
I'm pretty sure of two of them but not of the third. Any tips?
 
D

DaveW

No, that motherboard will NOT accept much larger than a 1 GHz PIII CPU. NOT
1.5 GHz for sure!
 
D

David Maynard

Trevor said:
Well I have an even older system that'll work as a backup if I somehow
fry this system. I'm going to buy from a seller that will return
whatever I buy in case it doesn't work, even if they're a bit more
expensive.

Good luck. Just off hand I don't know of anyone who'll take a processor
back after having installed it in a system because of the very potentiality
you mention: 'fried'.

I'm going to go for a 1.2 or 1.3Ghz Tualatin. A 95% processor speed
increase would be meet my needs as far as performance and price go.
Memory, hard drive, and network speeds are all fine; the system is
definitely processor-bound (I've been doing some video editing, with a
766Mhz Celeron it's pretty slow...)




Will do. I don't suppose you have any direct experience changing the
FSB clock on a Compaq 5006US? This webpage:

http://www.igs.net/~ndaines/Qfiles/bmw-r.html

says it can be done; the board looks identical or at least very
similar to mine, but I'm having trouble identifying the three jumpers.
I'm pretty sure of two of them but not of the third. Any tips?

The third, in that picture, just sets it to be whatever the processor asks
for. I.E., as it says, 66/100/133. That's 'default'. Put to the other
position the FSB becomes what is manually set by the other 2.

There isn't any reason to manually set the FSB unless you're overclocking
and there's not much use to it in this case because of the price spread (a
933 P-III is as cheap as a 700 you'd use to overclock to 933), unless you
tried to overclock a 1 gig tualatin to 1.33 or a 1.1 gig tualatin to 1.46
(from the 100 MHz FSB they would normally ask for to 133 MHz FSB). But
that's a lot more problematic than using the 1.2 gig as is. And if the
overclock doesn't work (Vcore problems) you're stuck with the lower speed.

To make matters worse, going to 1.46 gig is really pushing the Vcore
regulators and sometimes burns them out (which is why I originally
suggested getting the 1.3 gig, or less). I lost two BH6s running
overclocked 1.46 gig tualatins, although I repaired them with beefier Vcore
FETs (not terribly difficult but not trivial either) and they're back in
operation.

Being on 133 MHz FSB *would* be a benefit for video editing but I'm not
sure how much more when using the built in shared memory video as it's
sucking up a heck of a lot of memory bandwidth (the problem of it being
*shared* memory). Point being: if it's sucking up, say, 20% of the memory
bandwidth then there's not much more than 100Mhz worth of it left over
anyway so a higher than 100MHz processor FSB doesn't gain much. In theory,
though, the 'sweet spot' for that board would be a 1 gig tualatin
overclocked to 1.33/133 but, as I mentioned, that adds another risk factor.
The 'hot spot' would be a 1.1 overclocked to 1.46/133, at significantly
more risk. (and some people have gotten tualatins to 1.6 gig so I was being
conservative, and presuming no overclocking, when I said you couldn't get
to 1.5)

To illustrate some of the problems one can run into when overclocking (not
to mention overclocking a processor that is supposedly incompatible with
the board to begin with), none of my BH6s will run tualatins over 112 Mhz
FSB, no matter what, even though they ran coppermine P-IIIs at 133.
Precisely why they won't remains a mystery to this day but it is useful to
note that the BX chipset on them is not specified to operate 133 MHz FSB
(but many, if not most, do) while the 810E is.

Btw, it's undocumented but the el-cheapo clone FC-PGA2 adapter I got *does*
have Vcore jumper positions on it (for overclocking) but you have to trace
them out to discover which ones do what. I discovered it because I jumper
the processor pins directly and they didn't WORK when using that adapter,
because it was over riding them. Whether they all do I couldn't say, but
then, as I mentioned, I jumper the processor pins anyway so it was not a
big issue for me.

So you actually have a lot of possible choices depending on how much you
want to spend and how adventurous you are.
 
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T

Trevor Smithson

Good luck. Just off hand I don't know of anyone who'll take a processor
back after having installed it in a system because of the very potentiality
you mention: 'fried'.

Didn't know that. Of course if I somehow cripple the new processor I
would have no recourse; but I would've thought that if it simply
doesn't work and I return it in an as-bought condition, there would
not be a problem (other than, maybe, a restocking fee). I guess that
isn't true?

The third, in that picture, just sets it to be whatever the processor asks
for. I.E., as it says, 66/100/133. That's 'default'. Put to the other
position the FSB becomes what is manually set by the other 2.
Ok.

There isn't any reason to manually set the FSB unless you're overclocking
and there's not much use to it in this case because of the price spread (a
933 P-III is as cheap as a 700 you'd use to overclock to 933), unless you
tried to overclock a 1 gig tualatin to 1.33 or a 1.1 gig tualatin to 1.46
(from the 100 MHz FSB they would normally ask for to 133 MHz FSB). But
that's a lot more problematic than using the 1.2 gig as is. And if the
overclock doesn't work (Vcore problems) you're stuck with the lower speed.

Ok, I though I would have to set it myself. I'm not going to
overclock it, I have little experience doing that and since this is
already an upgrade why risk frying things, unreliability, etc.

To make matters worse, going to 1.46 gig is really pushing the Vcore
regulators and sometimes burns them out (which is why I originally
suggested getting the 1.3 gig, or less). I lost two BH6s running
overclocked 1.46 gig tualatins, although I repaired them with beefier Vcore
FETs (not terribly difficult but not trivial either) and they're back in
operation.

Being on 133 MHz FSB *would* be a benefit for video editing but I'm not
sure how much more when using the built in shared memory video as it's
sucking up a heck of a lot of memory bandwidth (the problem of it being
*shared* memory). Point being: if it's sucking up, say, 20% of the memory
bandwidth then there's not much more than 100Mhz worth of it left over
anyway so a higher than 100MHz processor FSB doesn't gain much. In theory,
though, the 'sweet spot' for that board would be a 1 gig tualatin
overclocked to 1.33/133 but, as I mentioned, that adds another risk factor.
The 'hot spot' would be a 1.1 overclocked to 1.46/133, at significantly
more risk. (and some people have gotten tualatins to 1.6 gig so I was being
conservative, and presuming no overclocking, when I said you couldn't get
to 1.5)

In this system the main memory shouldn't be shared anymore as I am
using an add-on memory card with 64MB of memory. The built in video
was pretty lame even when it was new...
To illustrate some of the problems one can run into when overclocking (not
to mention overclocking a processor that is supposedly incompatible with
the board to begin with), none of my BH6s will run tualatins over 112 Mhz
FSB, no matter what, even though they ran coppermine P-IIIs at 133.
Precisely why they won't remains a mystery to this day but it is useful to
note that the BX chipset on them is not specified to operate 133 MHz FSB
(but many, if not most, do) while the 810E is.

Btw, it's undocumented but the el-cheapo clone FC-PGA2 adapter I got *does*
have Vcore jumper positions on it (for overclocking) but you have to trace
them out to discover which ones do what. I discovered it because I jumper
the processor pins directly and they didn't WORK when using that adapter,
because it was over riding them. Whether they all do I couldn't say, but
then, as I mentioned, I jumper the processor pins anyway so it was not a
big issue for me.

So you actually have a lot of possible choices depending on how much you
want to spend and how adventurous you are.

Not adventurous at al! [:<)

 
D

David Maynard

Trevor said:
Didn't know that. Of course if I somehow cripple the new processor I
would have no recourse; but I would've thought that if it simply
doesn't work and I return it in an as-bought condition, there would
not be a problem (other than, maybe, a restocking fee). I guess that
isn't true?

Never say never.

One problem for the dealer would be in having to test them.

Ok, I though I would have to set it myself. I'm not going to
overclock it, I have little experience doing that and since this is
already an upgrade why risk frying things, unreliability, etc.

That's certainly a reasonable decision. The answer as to 'why' is for more
speed, of course.

In this system the main memory shouldn't be shared anymore as I am
using an add-on memory card with 64MB of memory.

I presume you mean a video card with memory.
The built in video
was pretty lame even when it was new...

Definitely, and they are a significant performance hit.

To illustrate some of the problems one can run into when overclocking (not
to mention overclocking a processor that is supposedly incompatible with
the board to begin with), none of my BH6s will run tualatins over 112 Mhz
FSB, no matter what, even though they ran coppermine P-IIIs at 133.
Precisely why they won't remains a mystery to this day but it is useful to
note that the BX chipset on them is not specified to operate 133 MHz FSB
(but many, if not most, do) while the 810E is.

Btw, it's undocumented but the el-cheapo clone FC-PGA2 adapter I got *does*
have Vcore jumper positions on it (for overclocking) but you have to trace
them out to discover which ones do what. I discovered it because I jumper
the processor pins directly and they didn't WORK when using that adapter,
because it was over riding them. Whether they all do I couldn't say, but
then, as I mentioned, I jumper the processor pins anyway so it was not a
big issue for me.

So you actually have a lot of possible choices depending on how much you
want to spend and how adventurous you are.


Not adventurous at al! [:<)
 
T

Trevor Smithson

David,

Wanted to let you know that I ended up getting a Celeron Tualatin
1.3Ghz as an upgrade to my system. Also got the cheapo CPU
adapter that you mentioned as well. System's been running fine for
two days, seems rock-solid so far.

Thanks again for answering all my questions.

Trevor said:
Didn't know that. Of course if I somehow cripple the new processor I
would have no recourse; but I would've thought that if it simply
doesn't work and I return it in an as-bought condition, there would
not be a problem (other than, maybe, a restocking fee). I guess that
isn't true?

Never say never.

One problem for the dealer would be in having to test them.

Ok, I though I would have to set it myself. I'm not going to
overclock it, I have little experience doing that and since this is
already an upgrade why risk frying things, unreliability, etc.

That's certainly a reasonable decision. The answer as to 'why' is for more
speed, of course.

In this system the main memory shouldn't be shared anymore as I am
using an add-on memory card with 64MB of memory.

I presume you mean a video card with memory.
The built in video
was pretty lame even when it was new...

Definitely, and they are a significant performance hit.

To illustrate some of the problems one can run into when overclocking (not
to mention overclocking a processor that is supposedly incompatible with
the board to begin with), none of my BH6s will run tualatins over 112 Mhz
FSB, no matter what, even though they ran coppermine P-IIIs at 133.
Precisely why they won't remains a mystery to this day but it is useful to
note that the BX chipset on them is not specified to operate 133 MHz FSB
(but many, if not most, do) while the 810E is.

Btw, it's undocumented but the el-cheapo clone FC-PGA2 adapter I got *does*
have Vcore jumper positions on it (for overclocking) but you have to trace
them out to discover which ones do what. I discovered it because I jumper
the processor pins directly and they didn't WORK when using that adapter,
because it was over riding them. Whether they all do I couldn't say, but
then, as I mentioned, I jumper the processor pins anyway so it was not a
big issue for me.

So you actually have a lot of possible choices depending on how much you
want to spend and how adventurous you are.


Not adventurous at al! [:<)


Also, I've done some more research, and the FSB can be altered by
changing jumpers around; it can be changed to 100 or 133mhz.

Does this change anything you recommended?


Makes no difference.



Thanks again




You need to find the ID tag that has the actual model number (like 5000T,
or 5010US, or 5080US, or whatever)

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/...&cc=us&product=92873&dlc=en&docname=c00004461

This is an example of the adapter and they have a compatibility list.

http://www.upgradeware.com/english/product/370gu/370gu.htm

I would, and did, buy an el-cheapo clone for like 5 bucks, though, since
they're the same thing. Such as this one
http://www.hardwarecooling.com/product_info.php/products_id/199




So, given that what would you recommend?

Thanks again!


Trevor Smithson wrote:





Hi everyone

I figure if I can up the processor in this system to about 1.5Ghz I
can get another couple years use out of it...here is the info from
Everest. I'd appreciate if someone could tell me if the processor can
be upgraded, and if so what is the max speed. Thanks.

Really need to know which model Compaq that is but the 810E chipset should
be able to use just about any coppermine CPU, either Celeron or P-III, but
you're not going to get 1.5 gig.

A P-III would be about 25% faster than a same speed Celeron because of the
larger cache. If you went to a 133 MHz FSB P-III, however, you might need
to change RAM too (if it's PC100, which is likely with a 766 celeron in
there). While not absolutely necessary, you really should change to PC133
even if using a 100 MHz FSB P-III, or Celeron (those >= 800MHz) as having
memory faster than the FSB helps compensate for the shared memory video.
(with a 766 MHz Celeron you're at the top end for keeping the existing
PC100 RAM)

There's a chance you could use the Tualatin Celerons (same performance as
the P-III) with an adapter. They go to 1.4 gig, on 100 MHz FSB, but I'd
stick with 1.3 gig, or less, to keep from overloading the voltage
regulators so much. You need to check the adapter's compatibility list
against the Compaq model number to see if it'll work, though.
 
R

Ruel Smith

Trevor said:
I figure if I can up the processor in this system to about 1.5Ghz I
can get another couple years use out of it...here is the info from
Everest. I'd appreciate if someone could tell me if the processor can
be upgraded, and if so what is the max speed. Thanks.

Honestly, look for a nice sale on computers and get a nice eMachines or
Compaq with preferrably an Athlon XP processor for about $500 complete with
monitor and printer. I'm not sure if the Athlon XP is available anymore on
those systems, but when they were, they were a steal. You might only be
able to get a Celeron or Sempron system now, as the Athlon XP is going the
way of the dodo bird. Of those two offerings, I'd go Sempron given a
choice. Your processor, though OC'd to 1.5 GHz is running approximately the
same speed a P3 overclocked to 1.2 GHz, which is not as fast as a factory
1.2 GHz P3 would be, and that's light years behind, these days. You _could_
get by, but you'll wish you hadn't...

Just my $.02...
 
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D

David Maynard

Trevor said:
David,

Wanted to let you know that I ended up getting a Celeron Tualatin
1.3Ghz as an upgrade to my system. Also got the cheapo CPU
adapter that you mentioned as well. System's been running fine for
two days, seems rock-solid so far.

Thanks again for answering all my questions.

SUPER! I'm glad it worked out for you.

As I alluded, I have 4 systems upgraded with tualatins and they're a nice
last hurrah; and particularly satisfying, for me anyway, to see what began
life as a celeron 300 system running 1.3 gig.
 
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