Building new machines

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Silverhazesurfer, Aug 3, 2018.

  1. Silverhazesurfer

    Silverhazesurfer Master of Logic

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    Surfer here....I hope all has been well. It's been a while, as usual recently.

    I'm building two new machines for the shop. One is a work station that my parts rep will use. Dual screens, nothing crazy. The other will be my Hub machine for use with my daily office requirements as well as supporting additional network connections for device configuration uploads, more USB 2/3 sockets, a couple of hard drives for data storage and documentation, virtual machine potential, and anything else I want to make it do. Here's the thing....

    I want Windows 7. FML if I can't work through thousands of boards to narrow down where I can get one that will hold a CPU with enough cores to handle processing but doesn't have a BIOS that requires Windows 10 security functions. Most of what I've gotten in the past is ASUS boards. So far, I find ones that are higher than I want to spend or otherwise not up to par equipment-wise. A board with potential for 32GB of memory and a quad core or higher Intel CPU is where I'm pointed.

    Asus was my go to for a while. I used to use Gigabyte video cards a while back (when I first signed up to this site, actually). Those cards would fail, leading one to believe they were crap quality. I'm sure it didn't have anything to do with cramming them in a metal cigar box with all the other stuff and expecting it to run 24/7, right?

    Who is your go to for system parts? Do you have a preferred manufacturer? Who should I stay away from? Comment below.
     
    Silverhazesurfer, Aug 3, 2018
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  2. Silverhazesurfer

    Ian Administrator

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    Good to see you again :). It's almost your 10 year anniversary here!

    Most of us on here will be from the UK, but I'm sure some of the USA members will have some component supplier suggestions.

    I don't think there are many "avoid" manufacturers these days - there used to be plenty, but any of the big names (Gigabyte, Asus, MSI, ASRock, etc...) are pretty solid. I tend to look at their warranty period and how well supported old boards are for BIOS updates.

    Is there a reason you need to use Windows 7, or is it just a strong preference? The reason I ask is that MS are doing anything and everything to shift people away from it (as it's pretty old now). Security updates will stop in around 2020 IIRC, which isn't far away and could leave you with big problems in a couple of years. If you've got any specific problems with WIndows 10, it may be easier for us to suggest a workaround for that instead (or even use Linux).

    I think that you have have found the problem :lol:.
     
    Ian, Aug 4, 2018
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  3. Silverhazesurfer

    Silverhazesurfer Master of Logic

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    Time flies, huh.

    For me, the only true "avoid" is the AMD systems. I have never had success with a quick AMD setup. Shame, bc I used to like the old school AMD options against the Pentium MMX technology. I'm looking in the direction of GB for a board.

    Win 7 has been the preference. Not only for me but for the office as well as many of the toys I get to play with. I had a Win 10 machine but quickly formatted it and put 7 on it. These machines are going to be used as workstations and one will have extended use for a terminal to interface with the devices we install on these yachts. I am on the edge of configuring a small domain setup for authentication to handle resource management. While not impossible to manage a 10 enterprise setup, it is not a learning curve that I want to jump into at the moment. The technology needed to get this office set up is not yet old enough to be ridiculously expensive. Once I get the base, I put upgrade schedules in place.

    This is what they gave me to work with. I made it fit, for the price they offered. Failure rate was sub 5%.
     
    Silverhazesurfer, Aug 4, 2018
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  4. Silverhazesurfer

    Abarbarian Acruncher

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    https://www.overclockers.co.uk/inte...ocket-lga1151-processor-retail-cp-64p-in.html

    https://www.overclockers.co.uk/giga...151-ddr4-micro-atx-motherboard-mb-56p-gi.html

    The above cost about £120. Add in a 128 GB NVME drive and 4/8 GB of DDR4 memory and you have your parts rep work station.

    https://www.gearbest.com/cables-con...29.html?wid=1433363&currency=GBP&vip=15026323

    Oh and another £1 for something like the above to get your dual monitor support.

    The above may even be powerful enough for your own pc.

    :cool:

    You will have to source the cigar tin your self as I have stopped smoking. :lol:
     
    Abarbarian, Aug 5, 2018
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  5. Silverhazesurfer

    Ian Administrator

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    Funnily enough, with all uses of the machine that you suggested, I was thinking this may be a nice time to try the AMD Ryzen 2 :lol:. I've not used AMD CPUs for a few years myself, but my next machine may be one - as it looks like they're great multitasking performers at the moment. Plenty of good Intel options out there though :).

    Gigabyte are solid, so that's a good choice for a board :thumb:.
     
    Ian, Aug 5, 2018
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