Autocomplete Suggestions


E

Erwin

Why don't the names of all relevant contacts for which I have email
addresses appear in the suggestion list as I type the first letters of an
address.

Example: I have four contacts whose names and email addresses begin with kr
[kris] but only two of those show up on the autocomplete list if I type "kr"
[or simply "k"].

TIA
 
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D

DL

The autocomplete feature is populated with data as email adds are typed in,
it does not automatically populate with your contacts email.
 
M

Mark R Penn

It's more of a recently used list than a look-up list.

If you type "kr" and leave it at that, the letters should get a red
underline after a while, and you can then right click and get a full list.

Alternatively, just put in kr, and then send. So long as you have "Automatic
name checking" enabled in Tools>Options>E-mail Options>Advanced E-mail
Options you should be prompted with a full list when you hit send.

Mark
 
R

Russ Valentine [MVP-Outlook]

Not quite. You are describing autoresolution.
The original poster was asking about autocompletion.
The two features are completely different.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Mark R Penn said:
It's more of a recently used list than a look-up list.

If you type "kr" and leave it at that, the letters should get a red
underline after a while, and you can then right click and get a full list.

Alternatively, just put in kr, and then send. So long as you have
"Automatic name checking" enabled in Tools>Options>E-mail Options>Advanced
E-mail Options you should be prompted with a full list when you hit send.

Mark

Erwin said:
Why don't the names of all relevant contacts for which I have email
addresses appear in the suggestion list as I type the first letters of an
address.

Example: I have four contacts whose names and email addresses begin with
kr [kris] but only two of those show up on the autocomplete list if I
type "kr" [or simply "k"].

TIA
 
M

Mark R Penn

Exactly - auto completion doesn't do what he wants, so I described the
alternatives.

Q - "I can't get my car to do more than 40mph in second gear. It's really
frustrating, I need to go faster; please help".

Two possible answers:

"You won't get it to go faster as 2nd gear doesn't support that"

or

"Second gear won't do it, but try 3rd and then 4th, that should do what you
want".

Which is the most helpful?

Mark

Russ Valentine said:
Not quite. You are describing autoresolution.
The original poster was asking about autocompletion.
The two features are completely different.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Mark R Penn said:
It's more of a recently used list than a look-up list.

If you type "kr" and leave it at that, the letters should get a red
underline after a while, and you can then right click and get a full
list.

Alternatively, just put in kr, and then send. So long as you have
"Automatic name checking" enabled in Tools>Options>E-mail
Options>Advanced E-mail Options you should be prompted with a full list
when you hit send.

Mark

Erwin said:
Why don't the names of all relevant contacts for which I have email
addresses appear in the suggestion list as I type the first letters of
an address.

Example: I have four contacts whose names and email addresses begin with
kr [kris] but only two of those show up on the autocomplete list if I
type "kr" [or simply "k"].

TIA
 
R

Russ Valentine [MVP-Outlook]

I agree. You asked what is more helpful. I suspect that what is more helpful
is to provide complete information that you are suggesting he use a
different feature and how to invoke it. Most users do not know that both
features exist and get the two confused all the time. He will likely not
even discover autoresolution unless he turns autocompletion off since
autocompletion kicks in immediately and is hard to override unless you know
how.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Mark R Penn said:
Exactly - auto completion doesn't do what he wants, so I described the
alternatives.

Q - "I can't get my car to do more than 40mph in second gear. It's really
frustrating, I need to go faster; please help".

Two possible answers:

"You won't get it to go faster as 2nd gear doesn't support that"

or

"Second gear won't do it, but try 3rd and then 4th, that should do what
you want".

Which is the most helpful?

Mark

Russ Valentine said:
Not quite. You are describing autoresolution.
The original poster was asking about autocompletion.
The two features are completely different.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Mark R Penn said:
It's more of a recently used list than a look-up list.

If you type "kr" and leave it at that, the letters should get a red
underline after a while, and you can then right click and get a full
list.

Alternatively, just put in kr, and then send. So long as you have
"Automatic name checking" enabled in Tools>Options>E-mail
Options>Advanced E-mail Options you should be prompted with a full list
when you hit send.

Mark

Why don't the names of all relevant contacts for which I have email
addresses appear in the suggestion list as I type the first letters of
an address.

Example: I have four contacts whose names and email addresses begin
with kr [kris] but only two of those show up on the autocomplete list
if I type "kr" [or simply "k"].

TIA
 
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M

Mark R Penn

Point taken, though I think it's a tiny bit picky, especially as your "Not
quite" comment didn't offer any clarification for the OP at all, and as
there's nowhere in the interface that calls automatic name checking "auto
resolution". Telling him to turn off auto completion and use auto resolution
instead would have left him totally confused (and me) ;) I don't see that it
matters whether or not he sees my solution as a separate feature, so long as
it works for him.

Users don't tend to think "which feature shall I use and what's it called?".
They think "what steps do I need to follow to get this damn thing working as
I expect".

I wouldn't suggest turning auto complete off anyway, as it's a very useful
feature in it's own right, and doesn't stop you from using auto resolution
(I still prefer to call it automatic name checking).

Edited version of my original post below for the benefit of the OP:

AUTO COMPLETE IS more of a recently used list than a look-up list.

INSTEAD, if you type "kr" and leave it at that BY CLICKING IN THE BODY OF
THE MESSAGE OR IN ANOTHER NAME FIELD, RATHER THAN ON ANY OF THE SUGGESTIONS,
the letters should get a red underline after a while, and you can then right
click and get a full list.

Alternatively, just put in kr, and then CLICK send WITHOUT CLICKING ON ANY
OF THE AUTO COMPLETE SUGGESTIONS. So long as you have "Automatic
name checking" enabled in Tools>Options>E-mail Options>Advanced E-mail
Options you should be prompted with a full list when you hit send.

Mark

Russ Valentine said:
I agree. You asked what is more helpful. I suspect that what is more
helpful is to provide complete information that you are suggesting he use a
different feature and how to invoke it. Most users do not know that both
features exist and get the two confused all the time. He will likely not
even discover autoresolution unless he turns autocompletion off since
autocompletion kicks in immediately and is hard to override unless you know
how.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Mark R Penn said:
Exactly - auto completion doesn't do what he wants, so I described the
alternatives.

Q - "I can't get my car to do more than 40mph in second gear. It's really
frustrating, I need to go faster; please help".

Two possible answers:

"You won't get it to go faster as 2nd gear doesn't support that"

or

"Second gear won't do it, but try 3rd and then 4th, that should do what
you want".

Which is the most helpful?

Mark

Russ Valentine said:
Not quite. You are describing autoresolution.
The original poster was asking about autocompletion.
The two features are completely different.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
It's more of a recently used list than a look-up list.

If you type "kr" and leave it at that, the letters should get a red
underline after a while, and you can then right click and get a full
list.

Alternatively, just put in kr, and then send. So long as you have
"Automatic name checking" enabled in Tools>Options>E-mail
Options>Advanced E-mail Options you should be prompted with a full list
when you hit send.

Mark

Why don't the names of all relevant contacts for which I have email
addresses appear in the suggestion list as I type the first letters of
an address.

Example: I have four contacts whose names and email addresses begin
with kr [kris] but only two of those show up on the autocomplete list
if I type "kr" [or simply "k"].

TIA
 
R

Russ Valentine [MVP-Outlook]

I wasn't being picky. I was pointing out that your suggestion to use
autoresolution (aka Automatic Name checking) instead of autocompletion,
while a good one, would not have worked as written because autoresolution
would not have been invoked. I wasn't trying to post a comprehensive
clarification of the difference for the original poster because I knew you
were perfectly capable of doing that, and have.

I quite agree that it is not necessary for most users to know which feature
they are using or why. But because of the way Microsoft implemented its
newer autocompletion feature (which does not use Contacts data) as the front
door to its older autoresolution feature (which does), most users are now
hopelessly confused by this whole area of automatic address selection. Users
who prefer the older autoresolution feature (Microsoft calls it that, not I)
are often unable to invoke it until they turn off autocompletion, even
though that is not necessary.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Mark R Penn said:
Point taken, though I think it's a tiny bit picky, especially as your "Not
quite" comment didn't offer any clarification for the OP at all, and as
there's nowhere in the interface that calls automatic name checking "auto
resolution". Telling him to turn off auto completion and use auto
resolution instead would have left him totally confused (and me) ;) I
don't see that it matters whether or not he sees my solution as a separate
feature, so long as it works for him.

Users don't tend to think "which feature shall I use and what's it
called?". They think "what steps do I need to follow to get this damn
thing working as I expect".

I wouldn't suggest turning auto complete off anyway, as it's a very useful
feature in it's own right, and doesn't stop you from using auto resolution
(I still prefer to call it automatic name checking).

Edited version of my original post below for the benefit of the OP:

AUTO COMPLETE IS more of a recently used list than a look-up list.

INSTEAD, if you type "kr" and leave it at that BY CLICKING IN THE BODY OF
THE MESSAGE OR IN ANOTHER NAME FIELD, RATHER THAN ON ANY OF THE
SUGGESTIONS, the letters should get a red underline after a while, and you
can then right click and get a full list.

Alternatively, just put in kr, and then CLICK send WITHOUT CLICKING ON ANY
OF THE AUTO COMPLETE SUGGESTIONS. So long as you have "Automatic
name checking" enabled in Tools>Options>E-mail Options>Advanced E-mail
Options you should be prompted with a full list when you hit send.

Mark

Russ Valentine said:
I agree. You asked what is more helpful. I suspect that what is more
helpful is to provide complete information that you are suggesting he use
a different feature and how to invoke it. Most users do not know that both
features exist and get the two confused all the time. He will likely not
even discover autoresolution unless he turns autocompletion off since
autocompletion kicks in immediately and is hard to override unless you
know how.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Mark R Penn said:
Exactly - auto completion doesn't do what he wants, so I described the
alternatives.

Q - "I can't get my car to do more than 40mph in second gear. It's
really frustrating, I need to go faster; please help".

Two possible answers:

"You won't get it to go faster as 2nd gear doesn't support that"

or

"Second gear won't do it, but try 3rd and then 4th, that should do what
you want".

Which is the most helpful?

Mark

Not quite. You are describing autoresolution.
The original poster was asking about autocompletion.
The two features are completely different.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
It's more of a recently used list than a look-up list.

If you type "kr" and leave it at that, the letters should get a red
underline after a while, and you can then right click and get a full
list.

Alternatively, just put in kr, and then send. So long as you have
"Automatic name checking" enabled in Tools>Options>E-mail
Options>Advanced E-mail Options you should be prompted with a full
list when you hit send.

Mark

Why don't the names of all relevant contacts for which I have email
addresses appear in the suggestion list as I type the first letters
of an address.

Example: I have four contacts whose names and email addresses begin
with kr [kris] but only two of those show up on the autocomplete list
if I type "kr" [or simply "k"].

TIA
 
M

Mark R Penn

The thing is though Russ, I can't see why it wouldn't work as originally
written? I admit I assumed that the user knew how to "type kr and leave it
at that", but then I also assumed he knows how to do lots of things in
Outlook. I relied on him to come back and ask if he doesn't know how to do
one of the steps. But given that assumption, it works fine exactly as
written doesn't it?

I only thought you were being a little picky because what I wrote was
correct. Lacking in detail for an absolute beginner maybe, but the OP didn't
sound like one of those to me, and at the end of the day we all have to
assume a certain level of knowledge or we'd be constantly saying "take the
mouse in your right hand........etc" ;) All I missed out really was how to
not accept an auto complete suggestion.

However, I do accept that you may have some experience that tells you that
most users would have found my post incomplete, when I don't.

I think we may have to agree to disagree on this, as in the end we're both
just trying to help ;)

Mark

Russ Valentine said:
I wasn't being picky. I was pointing out that your suggestion to use
autoresolution (aka Automatic Name checking) instead of autocompletion,
while a good one, would not have worked as written because autoresolution
would not have been invoked. I wasn't trying to post a comprehensive
clarification of the difference for the original poster because I knew you
were perfectly capable of doing that, and have.

I quite agree that it is not necessary for most users to know which
feature they are using or why. But because of the way Microsoft
implemented its newer autocompletion feature (which does not use Contacts
data) as the front door to its older autoresolution feature (which does),
most users are now hopelessly confused by this whole area of automatic
address selection. Users who prefer the older autoresolution feature
(Microsoft calls it that, not I) are often unable to invoke it until they
turn off autocompletion, even though that is not necessary.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Mark R Penn said:
Point taken, though I think it's a tiny bit picky, especially as your
"Not quite" comment didn't offer any clarification for the OP at all, and
as there's nowhere in the interface that calls automatic name checking
"auto resolution". Telling him to turn off auto completion and use auto
resolution instead would have left him totally confused (and me) ;) I
don't see that it matters whether or not he sees my solution as a
separate feature, so long as it works for him.

Users don't tend to think "which feature shall I use and what's it
called?". They think "what steps do I need to follow to get this damn
thing working as I expect".

I wouldn't suggest turning auto complete off anyway, as it's a very
useful feature in it's own right, and doesn't stop you from using auto
resolution (I still prefer to call it automatic name checking).

Edited version of my original post below for the benefit of the OP:

AUTO COMPLETE IS more of a recently used list than a look-up list.

INSTEAD, if you type "kr" and leave it at that BY CLICKING IN THE BODY OF
THE MESSAGE OR IN ANOTHER NAME FIELD, RATHER THAN ON ANY OF THE
SUGGESTIONS, the letters should get a red underline after a while, and
you can then right click and get a full list.

Alternatively, just put in kr, and then CLICK send WITHOUT CLICKING ON
ANY OF THE AUTO COMPLETE SUGGESTIONS. So long as you have "Automatic
name checking" enabled in Tools>Options>E-mail Options>Advanced E-mail
Options you should be prompted with a full list when you hit send.

Mark

Russ Valentine said:
I agree. You asked what is more helpful. I suspect that what is more
helpful is to provide complete information that you are suggesting he use
a different feature and how to invoke it. Most users do not know that
both features exist and get the two confused all the time. He will likely
not even discover autoresolution unless he turns autocompletion off since
autocompletion kicks in immediately and is hard to override unless you
know how.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Exactly - auto completion doesn't do what he wants, so I described the
alternatives.

Q - "I can't get my car to do more than 40mph in second gear. It's
really frustrating, I need to go faster; please help".

Two possible answers:

"You won't get it to go faster as 2nd gear doesn't support that"

or

"Second gear won't do it, but try 3rd and then 4th, that should do what
you want".

Which is the most helpful?

Mark

Not quite. You are describing autoresolution.
The original poster was asking about autocompletion.
The two features are completely different.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
It's more of a recently used list than a look-up list.

If you type "kr" and leave it at that, the letters should get a red
underline after a while, and you can then right click and get a full
list.

Alternatively, just put in kr, and then send. So long as you have
"Automatic name checking" enabled in Tools>Options>E-mail
Options>Advanced E-mail Options you should be prompted with a full
list when you hit send.

Mark

Why don't the names of all relevant contacts for which I have email
addresses appear in the suggestion list as I type the first letters
of an address.

Example: I have four contacts whose names and email addresses begin
with kr [kris] but only two of those show up on the autocomplete
list if I type "kr" [or simply "k"].

TIA
 
R

Russ Valentine [MVP-Outlook]

It wouldn't have worked because the autocompletion list is invoked after
typing only one letter. If he had typed 2 letters and "left it at that"
nothing would have happened (note: he said he still had 2 autocompletion
suggestions left after typing in 2 letters). If he had then tabbed out of
the field (which is the way most people exit the To: field), the topmost
autocompletion suggestion would have been selected. Autoresolution would
never have been invoked. He would have had to hit "Esc" or have clicked out
of the field to invoke autoresolution--something very few users do.

Suggesting a user try autoresolution instead of autocompletion to accomplish
what they want is exactly the right solution. But doing so is a lot trickier
and confusing than it should be.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Mark R Penn said:
The thing is though Russ, I can't see why it wouldn't work as originally
written? I admit I assumed that the user knew how to "type kr and leave it
at that", but then I also assumed he knows how to do lots of things in
Outlook. I relied on him to come back and ask if he doesn't know how to do
one of the steps. But given that assumption, it works fine exactly as
written doesn't it?

I only thought you were being a little picky because what I wrote was
correct. Lacking in detail for an absolute beginner maybe, but the OP
didn't sound like one of those to me, and at the end of the day we all
have to assume a certain level of knowledge or we'd be constantly saying
"take the mouse in your right hand........etc" ;) All I missed out really
was how to not accept an auto complete suggestion.

However, I do accept that you may have some experience that tells you that
most users would have found my post incomplete, when I don't.

I think we may have to agree to disagree on this, as in the end we're both
just trying to help ;)

Mark

Russ Valentine said:
I wasn't being picky. I was pointing out that your suggestion to use
autoresolution (aka Automatic Name checking) instead of autocompletion,
while a good one, would not have worked as written because autoresolution
would not have been invoked. I wasn't trying to post a comprehensive
clarification of the difference for the original poster because I knew you
were perfectly capable of doing that, and have.

I quite agree that it is not necessary for most users to know which
feature they are using or why. But because of the way Microsoft
implemented its newer autocompletion feature (which does not use Contacts
data) as the front door to its older autoresolution feature (which does),
most users are now hopelessly confused by this whole area of automatic
address selection. Users who prefer the older autoresolution feature
(Microsoft calls it that, not I) are often unable to invoke it until they
turn off autocompletion, even though that is not necessary.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Mark R Penn said:
Point taken, though I think it's a tiny bit picky, especially as your
"Not quite" comment didn't offer any clarification for the OP at all,
and as there's nowhere in the interface that calls automatic name
checking "auto resolution". Telling him to turn off auto completion and
use auto resolution instead would have left him totally confused (and
me) ;) I don't see that it matters whether or not he sees my solution as
a separate feature, so long as it works for him.

Users don't tend to think "which feature shall I use and what's it
called?". They think "what steps do I need to follow to get this damn
thing working as I expect".

I wouldn't suggest turning auto complete off anyway, as it's a very
useful feature in it's own right, and doesn't stop you from using auto
resolution (I still prefer to call it automatic name checking).

Edited version of my original post below for the benefit of the OP:

AUTO COMPLETE IS more of a recently used list than a look-up list.

INSTEAD, if you type "kr" and leave it at that BY CLICKING IN THE BODY
OF THE MESSAGE OR IN ANOTHER NAME FIELD, RATHER THAN ON ANY OF THE
SUGGESTIONS, the letters should get a red underline after a while, and
you can then right click and get a full list.

Alternatively, just put in kr, and then CLICK send WITHOUT CLICKING ON
ANY OF THE AUTO COMPLETE SUGGESTIONS. So long as you have "Automatic
name checking" enabled in Tools>Options>E-mail Options>Advanced E-mail
Options you should be prompted with a full list when you hit send.

Mark

I agree. You asked what is more helpful. I suspect that what is more
helpful is to provide complete information that you are suggesting he
use a different feature and how to invoke it. Most users do not know
that both features exist and get the two confused all the time. He will
likely not even discover autoresolution unless he turns autocompletion
off since autocompletion kicks in immediately and is hard to override
unless you know how.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Exactly - auto completion doesn't do what he wants, so I described the
alternatives.

Q - "I can't get my car to do more than 40mph in second gear. It's
really frustrating, I need to go faster; please help".

Two possible answers:

"You won't get it to go faster as 2nd gear doesn't support that"

or

"Second gear won't do it, but try 3rd and then 4th, that should do
what you want".

Which is the most helpful?

Mark

Not quite. You are describing autoresolution.
The original poster was asking about autocompletion.
The two features are completely different.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
It's more of a recently used list than a look-up list.

If you type "kr" and leave it at that, the letters should get a red
underline after a while, and you can then right click and get a full
list.

Alternatively, just put in kr, and then send. So long as you have
"Automatic name checking" enabled in Tools>Options>E-mail
Options>Advanced E-mail Options you should be prompted with a full
list when you hit send.

Mark

Why don't the names of all relevant contacts for which I have email
addresses appear in the suggestion list as I type the first letters
of an address.

Example: I have four contacts whose names and email addresses begin
with kr [kris] but only two of those show up on the autocomplete
list if I type "kr" [or simply "k"].

TIA
 
M

Mark R Penn

Well it's semantics then - "leave it at that" means "leave it at that", not
"allow it to be autocompleted". My crime was not explaining HOW to leave it
at that it appears?

I don't accept that "most" tab from field to field. I rarely do, because it
takes too long to get to the next field I actually want. Instead I click
where I want to be. I've not specifically watched to see how people do it,
but don't remember seeing anyone tab from field to field.

Mark

Russ Valentine said:
It wouldn't have worked because the autocompletion list is invoked after
typing only one letter. If he had typed 2 letters and "left it at that"
nothing would have happened (note: he said he still had 2 autocompletion
suggestions left after typing in 2 letters). If he had then tabbed out of
the field (which is the way most people exit the To: field), the topmost
autocompletion suggestion would have been selected. Autoresolution would
never have been invoked. He would have had to hit "Esc" or have clicked
out of the field to invoke autoresolution--something very few users do.

Suggesting a user try autoresolution instead of autocompletion to
accomplish what they want is exactly the right solution. But doing so is a
lot trickier and confusing than it should be.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Mark R Penn said:
The thing is though Russ, I can't see why it wouldn't work as originally
written? I admit I assumed that the user knew how to "type kr and leave
it at that", but then I also assumed he knows how to do lots of things in
Outlook. I relied on him to come back and ask if he doesn't know how to
do one of the steps. But given that assumption, it works fine exactly as
written doesn't it?

I only thought you were being a little picky because what I wrote was
correct. Lacking in detail for an absolute beginner maybe, but the OP
didn't sound like one of those to me, and at the end of the day we all
have to assume a certain level of knowledge or we'd be constantly saying
"take the mouse in your right hand........etc" ;) All I missed out
really was how to not accept an auto complete suggestion.

However, I do accept that you may have some experience that tells you
that most users would have found my post incomplete, when I don't.

I think we may have to agree to disagree on this, as in the end we're
both just trying to help ;)

Mark

Russ Valentine said:
I wasn't being picky. I was pointing out that your suggestion to use
autoresolution (aka Automatic Name checking) instead of autocompletion,
while a good one, would not have worked as written because autoresolution
would not have been invoked. I wasn't trying to post a comprehensive
clarification of the difference for the original poster because I knew
you were perfectly capable of doing that, and have.

I quite agree that it is not necessary for most users to know which
feature they are using or why. But because of the way Microsoft
implemented its newer autocompletion feature (which does not use
Contacts data) as the front door to its older autoresolution feature
(which does), most users are now hopelessly confused by this whole area
of automatic address selection. Users who prefer the older
autoresolution feature (Microsoft calls it that, not I) are often unable
to invoke it until they turn off autocompletion, even though that is not
necessary.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Point taken, though I think it's a tiny bit picky, especially as your
"Not quite" comment didn't offer any clarification for the OP at all,
and as there's nowhere in the interface that calls automatic name
checking "auto resolution". Telling him to turn off auto completion and
use auto resolution instead would have left him totally confused (and
me) ;) I don't see that it matters whether or not he sees my solution
as a separate feature, so long as it works for him.

Users don't tend to think "which feature shall I use and what's it
called?". They think "what steps do I need to follow to get this damn
thing working as I expect".

I wouldn't suggest turning auto complete off anyway, as it's a very
useful feature in it's own right, and doesn't stop you from using auto
resolution (I still prefer to call it automatic name checking).

Edited version of my original post below for the benefit of the OP:

AUTO COMPLETE IS more of a recently used list than a look-up list.

INSTEAD, if you type "kr" and leave it at that BY CLICKING IN THE BODY
OF THE MESSAGE OR IN ANOTHER NAME FIELD, RATHER THAN ON ANY OF THE
SUGGESTIONS, the letters should get a red underline after a while, and
you can then right click and get a full list.

Alternatively, just put in kr, and then CLICK send WITHOUT CLICKING ON
ANY OF THE AUTO COMPLETE SUGGESTIONS. So long as you have "Automatic
name checking" enabled in Tools>Options>E-mail Options>Advanced E-mail
Options you should be prompted with a full list when you hit send.

Mark

I agree. You asked what is more helpful. I suspect that what is more
helpful is to provide complete information that you are suggesting he
use a different feature and how to invoke it. Most users do not know
that both features exist and get the two confused all the time. He will
likely not even discover autoresolution unless he turns autocompletion
off since autocompletion kicks in immediately and is hard to override
unless you know how.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Exactly - auto completion doesn't do what he wants, so I described
the alternatives.

Q - "I can't get my car to do more than 40mph in second gear. It's
really frustrating, I need to go faster; please help".

Two possible answers:

"You won't get it to go faster as 2nd gear doesn't support that"

or

"Second gear won't do it, but try 3rd and then 4th, that should do
what you want".

Which is the most helpful?

Mark

Not quite. You are describing autoresolution.
The original poster was asking about autocompletion.
The two features are completely different.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
It's more of a recently used list than a look-up list.

If you type "kr" and leave it at that, the letters should get a red
underline after a while, and you can then right click and get a
full list.

Alternatively, just put in kr, and then send. So long as you have
"Automatic name checking" enabled in Tools>Options>E-mail
Options>Advanced E-mail Options you should be prompted with a full
list when you hit send.

Mark

Why don't the names of all relevant contacts for which I have
email addresses appear in the suggestion list as I type the first
letters of an address.

Example: I have four contacts whose names and email addresses
begin with kr [kris] but only two of those show up on the
autocomplete list if I type "kr" [or simply "k"].

TIA
 
Ad

Advertisements

R

Russ Valentine [MVP-Outlook]

Feel free to consider it just semantics if you want. My only point was and
remains that switching from autocompletion to autoresolution requires more
deliberate action than you posted. Few users would have managed to do so.
Usage studies show that for most users creating email is a keyboard
activity.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Mark R Penn said:
Well it's semantics then - "leave it at that" means "leave it at that",
not "allow it to be autocompleted". My crime was not explaining HOW to
leave it at that it appears?

I don't accept that "most" tab from field to field. I rarely do, because
it takes too long to get to the next field I actually want. Instead I
click where I want to be. I've not specifically watched to see how people
do it, but don't remember seeing anyone tab from field to field.

Mark

Russ Valentine said:
It wouldn't have worked because the autocompletion list is invoked after
typing only one letter. If he had typed 2 letters and "left it at that"
nothing would have happened (note: he said he still had 2 autocompletion
suggestions left after typing in 2 letters). If he had then tabbed out of
the field (which is the way most people exit the To: field), the topmost
autocompletion suggestion would have been selected. Autoresolution would
never have been invoked. He would have had to hit "Esc" or have clicked
out of the field to invoke autoresolution--something very few users do.

Suggesting a user try autoresolution instead of autocompletion to
accomplish what they want is exactly the right solution. But doing so is
a lot trickier and confusing than it should be.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Mark R Penn said:
The thing is though Russ, I can't see why it wouldn't work as originally
written? I admit I assumed that the user knew how to "type kr and leave
it at that", but then I also assumed he knows how to do lots of things
in Outlook. I relied on him to come back and ask if he doesn't know how
to do one of the steps. But given that assumption, it works fine exactly
as written doesn't it?

I only thought you were being a little picky because what I wrote was
correct. Lacking in detail for an absolute beginner maybe, but the OP
didn't sound like one of those to me, and at the end of the day we all
have to assume a certain level of knowledge or we'd be constantly saying
"take the mouse in your right hand........etc" ;) All I missed out
really was how to not accept an auto complete suggestion.

However, I do accept that you may have some experience that tells you
that most users would have found my post incomplete, when I don't.

I think we may have to agree to disagree on this, as in the end we're
both just trying to help ;)

Mark

I wasn't being picky. I was pointing out that your suggestion to use
autoresolution (aka Automatic Name checking) instead of autocompletion,
while a good one, would not have worked as written because
autoresolution would not have been invoked. I wasn't trying to post a
comprehensive clarification of the difference for the original poster
because I knew you were perfectly capable of doing that, and have.

I quite agree that it is not necessary for most users to know which
feature they are using or why. But because of the way Microsoft
implemented its newer autocompletion feature (which does not use
Contacts data) as the front door to its older autoresolution feature
(which does), most users are now hopelessly confused by this whole area
of automatic address selection. Users who prefer the older
autoresolution feature (Microsoft calls it that, not I) are often
unable to invoke it until they turn off autocompletion, even though
that is not necessary.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Point taken, though I think it's a tiny bit picky, especially as your
"Not quite" comment didn't offer any clarification for the OP at all,
and as there's nowhere in the interface that calls automatic name
checking "auto resolution". Telling him to turn off auto completion
and use auto resolution instead would have left him totally confused
(and me) ;) I don't see that it matters whether or not he sees my
solution as a separate feature, so long as it works for him.

Users don't tend to think "which feature shall I use and what's it
called?". They think "what steps do I need to follow to get this damn
thing working as I expect".

I wouldn't suggest turning auto complete off anyway, as it's a very
useful feature in it's own right, and doesn't stop you from using auto
resolution (I still prefer to call it automatic name checking).

Edited version of my original post below for the benefit of the OP:

AUTO COMPLETE IS more of a recently used list than a look-up list.

INSTEAD, if you type "kr" and leave it at that BY CLICKING IN THE BODY
OF THE MESSAGE OR IN ANOTHER NAME FIELD, RATHER THAN ON ANY OF THE
SUGGESTIONS, the letters should get a red underline after a while, and
you can then right click and get a full list.

Alternatively, just put in kr, and then CLICK send WITHOUT CLICKING ON
ANY OF THE AUTO COMPLETE SUGGESTIONS. So long as you have "Automatic
name checking" enabled in Tools>Options>E-mail Options>Advanced E-mail
Options you should be prompted with a full list when you hit send.

Mark

I agree. You asked what is more helpful. I suspect that what is more
helpful is to provide complete information that you are suggesting he
use a different feature and how to invoke it. Most users do not know
that both features exist and get the two confused all the time. He
will likely not even discover autoresolution unless he turns
autocompletion off since autocompletion kicks in immediately and is
hard to override unless you know how.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Exactly - auto completion doesn't do what he wants, so I described
the alternatives.

Q - "I can't get my car to do more than 40mph in second gear. It's
really frustrating, I need to go faster; please help".

Two possible answers:

"You won't get it to go faster as 2nd gear doesn't support that"

or

"Second gear won't do it, but try 3rd and then 4th, that should do
what you want".

Which is the most helpful?

Mark

Not quite. You are describing autoresolution.
The original poster was asking about autocompletion.
The two features are completely different.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
It's more of a recently used list than a look-up list.

If you type "kr" and leave it at that, the letters should get a
red underline after a while, and you can then right click and get
a full list.

Alternatively, just put in kr, and then send. So long as you have
"Automatic name checking" enabled in Tools>Options>E-mail
Options>Advanced E-mail Options you should be prompted with a full
list when you hit send.

Mark

Why don't the names of all relevant contacts for which I have
email addresses appear in the suggestion list as I type the first
letters of an address.

Example: I have four contacts whose names and email addresses
begin with kr [kris] but only two of those show up on the
autocomplete list if I type "kr" [or simply "k"].

TIA
 
M

Mark R Penn

More deliberate action than "leave it at that"? Leave it at that, and what?
What is this specific action you're looking for Russ? Other than "how" to
leave it at that, what is it that you think was missing? I even said
"Alternatively, just put in kr, and then send". That works every time, no
matter whether you're keyboard or mouse centric.

And if you're trying to give me a lesson in clear posting, how exactly does
"Not quite. You are describing autoresolution. The original poster was
asking about autocompletion. The two features are completely different."
help anybody? If, as you say, your point was that there was clearly
additional deliberate action required, why didn't you simply say "by the
way, do remember to xyz to make this work"? You obviously saw a huge gap in
the advise I offered, so rather than picking holes in my attempts to help,
why not add your clarification to the thread? What was "Not quite" about my
suggestion? Not quite correct? Not quite complete? Not quite getting the
point of the question? What? You made a far bigger assumption of knowledge
than I ever did, in assuming that non-MS people would have a clue what
"Autoresolution" means.

As I said, if the OP wasn't clear about HOW to leave it at that, he'd
undoubtedly post back, just as he would if he was unclear about anything
else that's assumed knowledge. These are conversations, not text books.

Mark

Russ Valentine said:
Feel free to consider it just semantics if you want. My only point was and
remains that switching from autocompletion to autoresolution requires more
deliberate action than you posted. Few users would have managed to do so.
Usage studies show that for most users creating email is a keyboard
activity.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Mark R Penn said:
Well it's semantics then - "leave it at that" means "leave it at that",
not "allow it to be autocompleted". My crime was not explaining HOW to
leave it at that it appears?

I don't accept that "most" tab from field to field. I rarely do, because
it takes too long to get to the next field I actually want. Instead I
click where I want to be. I've not specifically watched to see how people
do it, but don't remember seeing anyone tab from field to field.

Mark

Russ Valentine said:
It wouldn't have worked because the autocompletion list is invoked after
typing only one letter. If he had typed 2 letters and "left it at that"
nothing would have happened (note: he said he still had 2 autocompletion
suggestions left after typing in 2 letters). If he had then tabbed out
of the field (which is the way most people exit the To: field), the
topmost autocompletion suggestion would have been selected.
Autoresolution would never have been invoked. He would have had to hit
"Esc" or have clicked out of the field to invoke
autoresolution--something very few users do.

Suggesting a user try autoresolution instead of autocompletion to
accomplish what they want is exactly the right solution. But doing so is
a lot trickier and confusing than it should be.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
The thing is though Russ, I can't see why it wouldn't work as
originally written? I admit I assumed that the user knew how to "type
kr and leave it at that", but then I also assumed he knows how to do
lots of things in Outlook. I relied on him to come back and ask if he
doesn't know how to do one of the steps. But given that assumption, it
works fine exactly as written doesn't it?

I only thought you were being a little picky because what I wrote was
correct. Lacking in detail for an absolute beginner maybe, but the OP
didn't sound like one of those to me, and at the end of the day we all
have to assume a certain level of knowledge or we'd be constantly
saying "take the mouse in your right hand........etc" ;) All I missed
out really was how to not accept an auto complete suggestion.

However, I do accept that you may have some experience that tells you
that most users would have found my post incomplete, when I don't.

I think we may have to agree to disagree on this, as in the end we're
both just trying to help ;)

Mark

I wasn't being picky. I was pointing out that your suggestion to use
autoresolution (aka Automatic Name checking) instead of autocompletion,
while a good one, would not have worked as written because
autoresolution would not have been invoked. I wasn't trying to post a
comprehensive clarification of the difference for the original poster
because I knew you were perfectly capable of doing that, and have.

I quite agree that it is not necessary for most users to know which
feature they are using or why. But because of the way Microsoft
implemented its newer autocompletion feature (which does not use
Contacts data) as the front door to its older autoresolution feature
(which does), most users are now hopelessly confused by this whole
area of automatic address selection. Users who prefer the older
autoresolution feature (Microsoft calls it that, not I) are often
unable to invoke it until they turn off autocompletion, even though
that is not necessary.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Point taken, though I think it's a tiny bit picky, especially as your
"Not quite" comment didn't offer any clarification for the OP at all,
and as there's nowhere in the interface that calls automatic name
checking "auto resolution". Telling him to turn off auto completion
and use auto resolution instead would have left him totally confused
(and me) ;) I don't see that it matters whether or not he sees my
solution as a separate feature, so long as it works for him.

Users don't tend to think "which feature shall I use and what's it
called?". They think "what steps do I need to follow to get this damn
thing working as I expect".

I wouldn't suggest turning auto complete off anyway, as it's a very
useful feature in it's own right, and doesn't stop you from using
auto resolution (I still prefer to call it automatic name checking).

Edited version of my original post below for the benefit of the OP:

AUTO COMPLETE IS more of a recently used list than a look-up list.

INSTEAD, if you type "kr" and leave it at that BY CLICKING IN THE
BODY OF THE MESSAGE OR IN ANOTHER NAME FIELD, RATHER THAN ON ANY OF
THE SUGGESTIONS, the letters should get a red underline after a
while, and you can then right click and get a full list.

Alternatively, just put in kr, and then CLICK send WITHOUT CLICKING
ON ANY OF THE AUTO COMPLETE SUGGESTIONS. So long as you have
"Automatic
name checking" enabled in Tools>Options>E-mail Options>Advanced
E-mail
Options you should be prompted with a full list when you hit send.

Mark

I agree. You asked what is more helpful. I suspect that what is more
helpful is to provide complete information that you are suggesting he
use a different feature and how to invoke it. Most users do not know
that both features exist and get the two confused all the time. He
will likely not even discover autoresolution unless he turns
autocompletion off since autocompletion kicks in immediately and is
hard to override unless you know how.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Exactly - auto completion doesn't do what he wants, so I described
the alternatives.

Q - "I can't get my car to do more than 40mph in second gear. It's
really frustrating, I need to go faster; please help".

Two possible answers:

"You won't get it to go faster as 2nd gear doesn't support that"

or

"Second gear won't do it, but try 3rd and then 4th, that should do
what you want".

Which is the most helpful?

Mark

Not quite. You are describing autoresolution.
The original poster was asking about autocompletion.
The two features are completely different.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
It's more of a recently used list than a look-up list.

If you type "kr" and leave it at that, the letters should get a
red underline after a while, and you can then right click and get
a full list.

Alternatively, just put in kr, and then send. So long as you have
"Automatic name checking" enabled in Tools>Options>E-mail
Options>Advanced E-mail Options you should be prompted with a
full list when you hit send.

Mark

Why don't the names of all relevant contacts for which I have
email addresses appear in the suggestion list as I type the
first letters of an address.

Example: I have four contacts whose names and email addresses
begin with kr [kris] but only two of those show up on the
autocomplete list if I type "kr" [or simply "k"].

TIA
 
R

Russ Valentine [MVP-Outlook]

I simply saw the need for your post to be clarified. Sure I could have done
it for you, but I knew you were perfectly capable of doing it yourself and
left that opportunity to you. And you did so ably.
I'm sorry you take such great offense. It was not intended. When you've seen
as many users as I get tripped up by the confusion caused when Microsoft
introduced autocompletion as the undocumented overlay to autoresolution, you
do your best to head off more problems before they arise.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Mark R Penn said:
More deliberate action than "leave it at that"? Leave it at that, and
what? What is this specific action you're looking for Russ? Other than
"how" to leave it at that, what is it that you think was missing? I even
said "Alternatively, just put in kr, and then send". That works every
time, no matter whether you're keyboard or mouse centric.

And if you're trying to give me a lesson in clear posting, how exactly
does "Not quite. You are describing autoresolution. The original poster
was asking about autocompletion. The two features are completely
different." help anybody? If, as you say, your point was that there was
clearly additional deliberate action required, why didn't you simply say
"by the way, do remember to xyz to make this work"? You obviously saw a
huge gap in the advise I offered, so rather than picking holes in my
attempts to help, why not add your clarification to the thread? What was
"Not quite" about my suggestion? Not quite correct? Not quite complete?
Not quite getting the point of the question? What? You made a far bigger
assumption of knowledge than I ever did, in assuming that non-MS people
would have a clue what "Autoresolution" means.

As I said, if the OP wasn't clear about HOW to leave it at that, he'd
undoubtedly post back, just as he would if he was unclear about anything
else that's assumed knowledge. These are conversations, not text books.

Mark

Russ Valentine said:
Feel free to consider it just semantics if you want. My only point was
and remains that switching from autocompletion to autoresolution requires
more deliberate action than you posted. Few users would have managed to
do so. Usage studies show that for most users creating email is a
keyboard activity.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Mark R Penn said:
Well it's semantics then - "leave it at that" means "leave it at that",
not "allow it to be autocompleted". My crime was not explaining HOW to
leave it at that it appears?

I don't accept that "most" tab from field to field. I rarely do, because
it takes too long to get to the next field I actually want. Instead I
click where I want to be. I've not specifically watched to see how
people do it, but don't remember seeing anyone tab from field to field.

Mark

It wouldn't have worked because the autocompletion list is invoked
after typing only one letter. If he had typed 2 letters and "left it at
that" nothing would have happened (note: he said he still had 2
autocompletion suggestions left after typing in 2 letters). If he had
then tabbed out of the field (which is the way most people exit the To:
field), the topmost autocompletion suggestion would have been selected.
Autoresolution would never have been invoked. He would have had to hit
"Esc" or have clicked out of the field to invoke
autoresolution--something very few users do.

Suggesting a user try autoresolution instead of autocompletion to
accomplish what they want is exactly the right solution. But doing so
is a lot trickier and confusing than it should be.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
The thing is though Russ, I can't see why it wouldn't work as
originally written? I admit I assumed that the user knew how to "type
kr and leave it at that", but then I also assumed he knows how to do
lots of things in Outlook. I relied on him to come back and ask if he
doesn't know how to do one of the steps. But given that assumption, it
works fine exactly as written doesn't it?

I only thought you were being a little picky because what I wrote was
correct. Lacking in detail for an absolute beginner maybe, but the OP
didn't sound like one of those to me, and at the end of the day we all
have to assume a certain level of knowledge or we'd be constantly
saying "take the mouse in your right hand........etc" ;) All I missed
out really was how to not accept an auto complete suggestion.

However, I do accept that you may have some experience that tells you
that most users would have found my post incomplete, when I don't.

I think we may have to agree to disagree on this, as in the end we're
both just trying to help ;)

Mark

I wasn't being picky. I was pointing out that your suggestion to use
autoresolution (aka Automatic Name checking) instead of
autocompletion, while a good one, would not have worked as written
because autoresolution would not have been invoked. I wasn't trying to
post a comprehensive clarification of the difference for the original
poster because I knew you were perfectly capable of doing that, and
have.

I quite agree that it is not necessary for most users to know which
feature they are using or why. But because of the way Microsoft
implemented its newer autocompletion feature (which does not use
Contacts data) as the front door to its older autoresolution feature
(which does), most users are now hopelessly confused by this whole
area of automatic address selection. Users who prefer the older
autoresolution feature (Microsoft calls it that, not I) are often
unable to invoke it until they turn off autocompletion, even though
that is not necessary.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Point taken, though I think it's a tiny bit picky, especially as
your "Not quite" comment didn't offer any clarification for the OP
at all, and as there's nowhere in the interface that calls automatic
name checking "auto resolution". Telling him to turn off auto
completion and use auto resolution instead would have left him
totally confused (and me) ;) I don't see that it matters whether or
not he sees my solution as a separate feature, so long as it works
for him.

Users don't tend to think "which feature shall I use and what's it
called?". They think "what steps do I need to follow to get this
damn thing working as I expect".

I wouldn't suggest turning auto complete off anyway, as it's a very
useful feature in it's own right, and doesn't stop you from using
auto resolution (I still prefer to call it automatic name checking).

Edited version of my original post below for the benefit of the OP:

AUTO COMPLETE IS more of a recently used list than a look-up list.

INSTEAD, if you type "kr" and leave it at that BY CLICKING IN THE
BODY OF THE MESSAGE OR IN ANOTHER NAME FIELD, RATHER THAN ON ANY OF
THE SUGGESTIONS, the letters should get a red underline after a
while, and you can then right click and get a full list.

Alternatively, just put in kr, and then CLICK send WITHOUT CLICKING
ON ANY OF THE AUTO COMPLETE SUGGESTIONS. So long as you have
"Automatic
name checking" enabled in Tools>Options>E-mail Options>Advanced
E-mail
Options you should be prompted with a full list when you hit send.

Mark

I agree. You asked what is more helpful. I suspect that what is more
helpful is to provide complete information that you are suggesting
he use a different feature and how to invoke it. Most users do not
know that both features exist and get the two confused all the time.
He will likely not even discover autoresolution unless he turns
autocompletion off since autocompletion kicks in immediately and is
hard to override unless you know how.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Exactly - auto completion doesn't do what he wants, so I described
the alternatives.

Q - "I can't get my car to do more than 40mph in second gear. It's
really frustrating, I need to go faster; please help".

Two possible answers:

"You won't get it to go faster as 2nd gear doesn't support that"

or

"Second gear won't do it, but try 3rd and then 4th, that should do
what you want".

Which is the most helpful?

Mark

message Not quite. You are describing autoresolution.
The original poster was asking about autocompletion.
The two features are completely different.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
It's more of a recently used list than a look-up list.

If you type "kr" and leave it at that, the letters should get a
red underline after a while, and you can then right click and
get a full list.

Alternatively, just put in kr, and then send. So long as you
have "Automatic name checking" enabled in Tools>Options>E-mail
Options>Advanced E-mail Options you should be prompted with a
full list when you hit send.

Mark

Why don't the names of all relevant contacts for which I have
email addresses appear in the suggestion list as I type the
first letters of an address.

Example: I have four contacts whose names and email addresses
begin with kr [kris] but only two of those show up on the
autocomplete list if I type "kr" [or simply "k"].

TIA
 
M

Mark R Penn

OK, lets leave it at that. I accept that the (small) offence wasn't intended
:)

Mark

Russ Valentine said:
I simply saw the need for your post to be clarified. Sure I could have done
it for you, but I knew you were perfectly capable of doing it yourself and
left that opportunity to you. And you did so ably.
I'm sorry you take such great offense. It was not intended. When you've
seen as many users as I get tripped up by the confusion caused when
Microsoft introduced autocompletion as the undocumented overlay to
autoresolution, you do your best to head off more problems before they
arise.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Mark R Penn said:
More deliberate action than "leave it at that"? Leave it at that, and
what? What is this specific action you're looking for Russ? Other than
"how" to leave it at that, what is it that you think was missing? I even
said "Alternatively, just put in kr, and then send". That works every
time, no matter whether you're keyboard or mouse centric.

And if you're trying to give me a lesson in clear posting, how exactly
does "Not quite. You are describing autoresolution. The original poster
was asking about autocompletion. The two features are completely
different." help anybody? If, as you say, your point was that there was
clearly additional deliberate action required, why didn't you simply say
"by the way, do remember to xyz to make this work"? You obviously saw a
huge gap in the advise I offered, so rather than picking holes in my
attempts to help, why not add your clarification to the thread? What was
"Not quite" about my suggestion? Not quite correct? Not quite complete?
Not quite getting the point of the question? What? You made a far bigger
assumption of knowledge than I ever did, in assuming that non-MS people
would have a clue what "Autoresolution" means.

As I said, if the OP wasn't clear about HOW to leave it at that, he'd
undoubtedly post back, just as he would if he was unclear about anything
else that's assumed knowledge. These are conversations, not text books.

Mark

Russ Valentine said:
Feel free to consider it just semantics if you want. My only point was
and remains that switching from autocompletion to autoresolution
requires more deliberate action than you posted. Few users would have
managed to do so. Usage studies show that for most users creating email
is a keyboard activity.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Well it's semantics then - "leave it at that" means "leave it at that",
not "allow it to be autocompleted". My crime was not explaining HOW to
leave it at that it appears?

I don't accept that "most" tab from field to field. I rarely do,
because it takes too long to get to the next field I actually want.
Instead I click where I want to be. I've not specifically watched to
see how people do it, but don't remember seeing anyone tab from field
to field.

Mark

It wouldn't have worked because the autocompletion list is invoked
after typing only one letter. If he had typed 2 letters and "left it
at that" nothing would have happened (note: he said he still had 2
autocompletion suggestions left after typing in 2 letters). If he had
then tabbed out of the field (which is the way most people exit the
To: field), the topmost autocompletion suggestion would have been
selected. Autoresolution would never have been invoked. He would have
had to hit "Esc" or have clicked out of the field to invoke
autoresolution--something very few users do.

Suggesting a user try autoresolution instead of autocompletion to
accomplish what they want is exactly the right solution. But doing so
is a lot trickier and confusing than it should be.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
The thing is though Russ, I can't see why it wouldn't work as
originally written? I admit I assumed that the user knew how to "type
kr and leave it at that", but then I also assumed he knows how to do
lots of things in Outlook. I relied on him to come back and ask if he
doesn't know how to do one of the steps. But given that assumption,
it works fine exactly as written doesn't it?

I only thought you were being a little picky because what I wrote was
correct. Lacking in detail for an absolute beginner maybe, but the OP
didn't sound like one of those to me, and at the end of the day we
all have to assume a certain level of knowledge or we'd be constantly
saying "take the mouse in your right hand........etc" ;) All I
missed out really was how to not accept an auto complete suggestion.

However, I do accept that you may have some experience that tells you
that most users would have found my post incomplete, when I don't.

I think we may have to agree to disagree on this, as in the end we're
both just trying to help ;)

Mark

I wasn't being picky. I was pointing out that your suggestion to use
autoresolution (aka Automatic Name checking) instead of
autocompletion, while a good one, would not have worked as written
because autoresolution would not have been invoked. I wasn't trying
to post a comprehensive clarification of the difference for the
original poster because I knew you were perfectly capable of doing
that, and have.

I quite agree that it is not necessary for most users to know which
feature they are using or why. But because of the way Microsoft
implemented its newer autocompletion feature (which does not use
Contacts data) as the front door to its older autoresolution feature
(which does), most users are now hopelessly confused by this whole
area of automatic address selection. Users who prefer the older
autoresolution feature (Microsoft calls it that, not I) are often
unable to invoke it until they turn off autocompletion, even though
that is not necessary.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Point taken, though I think it's a tiny bit picky, especially as
your "Not quite" comment didn't offer any clarification for the OP
at all, and as there's nowhere in the interface that calls
automatic name checking "auto resolution". Telling him to turn off
auto completion and use auto resolution instead would have left him
totally confused (and me) ;) I don't see that it matters whether or
not he sees my solution as a separate feature, so long as it works
for him.

Users don't tend to think "which feature shall I use and what's it
called?". They think "what steps do I need to follow to get this
damn thing working as I expect".

I wouldn't suggest turning auto complete off anyway, as it's a very
useful feature in it's own right, and doesn't stop you from using
auto resolution (I still prefer to call it automatic name
checking).

Edited version of my original post below for the benefit of the OP:

AUTO COMPLETE IS more of a recently used list than a look-up list.

INSTEAD, if you type "kr" and leave it at that BY CLICKING IN THE
BODY OF THE MESSAGE OR IN ANOTHER NAME FIELD, RATHER THAN ON ANY OF
THE SUGGESTIONS, the letters should get a red underline after a
while, and you can then right click and get a full list.

Alternatively, just put in kr, and then CLICK send WITHOUT CLICKING
ON ANY OF THE AUTO COMPLETE SUGGESTIONS. So long as you have
"Automatic
name checking" enabled in Tools>Options>E-mail Options>Advanced
E-mail
Options you should be prompted with a full list when you hit send.

Mark

I agree. You asked what is more helpful. I suspect that what is
more helpful is to provide complete information that you are
suggesting he use a different feature and how to invoke it. Most
users do not know that both features exist and get the two confused
all the time. He will likely not even discover autoresolution
unless he turns autocompletion off since autocompletion kicks in
immediately and is hard to override unless you know how.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Exactly - auto completion doesn't do what he wants, so I
described the alternatives.

Q - "I can't get my car to do more than 40mph in second gear.
It's really frustrating, I need to go faster; please help".

Two possible answers:

"You won't get it to go faster as 2nd gear doesn't support that"

or

"Second gear won't do it, but try 3rd and then 4th, that should
do what you want".

Which is the most helpful?

Mark

message Not quite. You are describing autoresolution.
The original poster was asking about autocompletion.
The two features are completely different.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
It's more of a recently used list than a look-up list.

If you type "kr" and leave it at that, the letters should get a
red underline after a while, and you can then right click and
get a full list.

Alternatively, just put in kr, and then send. So long as you
have "Automatic name checking" enabled in Tools>Options>E-mail
Options>Advanced E-mail Options you should be prompted with a
full list when you hit send.

Mark

Why don't the names of all relevant contacts for which I have
email addresses appear in the suggestion list as I type the
first letters of an address.

Example: I have four contacts whose names and email addresses
begin with kr [kris] but only two of those show up on the
autocomplete list if I type "kr" [or simply "k"].

TIA
 
E

Erwin

Thanks for the replies.

And, "you're welcome" for my inadvertent furthering of Mark and Russ'
relationship.
 
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?

.

quite an interesting read!

it made my brain feel like it had run a marathon!!

--
Thanks for your help!
Laura..... :)


"Do you know where you're going to?"
Erwin said:
Thanks for the replies.

And, "you're welcome" for my inadvertent furthering of Mark and Russ'
relationship.

--
Erwin

Erwin said:
Why don't the names of all relevant contacts for which I have email
addresses appear in the suggestion list as I type the first letters of an
address.

Example: I have four contacts whose names and email addresses begin with
kr [kris] but only two of those show up on the autocomplete list if I type
"kr" [or simply "k"].

TIA
 
M

Mark R Penn

Well we aim to entertain ;)

Mark

. said:
quite an interesting read!

it made my brain feel like it had run a marathon!!

--
Thanks for your help!
Laura..... :)


"Do you know where you're going to?"
Erwin said:
Thanks for the replies.

And, "you're welcome" for my inadvertent furthering of Mark and Russ'
relationship.

--
Erwin

Erwin said:
Why don't the names of all relevant contacts for which I have email
addresses appear in the suggestion list as I type the first letters of an
address.

Example: I have four contacts whose names and email addresses begin
with
kr [kris] but only two of those show up on the autocomplete list if I type
"kr" [or simply "k"].

TIA
 
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Advertisements

R

Randy

Mark,

Couldn't help but throw my one cent into this post.

If you have a second, review: www.ingressor.com/autocompletetips.htm.

Randy
Mark R Penn said:
OK, lets leave it at that. I accept that the (small) offence wasn't
intended :)

Mark

Russ Valentine said:
I simply saw the need for your post to be clarified. Sure I could have
done it for you, but I knew you were perfectly capable of doing it
yourself and left that opportunity to you. And you did so ably.
I'm sorry you take such great offense. It was not intended. When you've
seen as many users as I get tripped up by the confusion caused when
Microsoft introduced autocompletion as the undocumented overlay to
autoresolution, you do your best to head off more problems before they
arise.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Mark R Penn said:
More deliberate action than "leave it at that"? Leave it at that, and
what? What is this specific action you're looking for Russ? Other than
"how" to leave it at that, what is it that you think was missing? I even
said "Alternatively, just put in kr, and then send". That works every
time, no matter whether you're keyboard or mouse centric.

And if you're trying to give me a lesson in clear posting, how exactly
does "Not quite. You are describing autoresolution. The original poster
was asking about autocompletion. The two features are completely
different." help anybody? If, as you say, your point was that there was
clearly additional deliberate action required, why didn't you simply say
"by the way, do remember to xyz to make this work"? You obviously saw a
huge gap in the advise I offered, so rather than picking holes in my
attempts to help, why not add your clarification to the thread? What was
"Not quite" about my suggestion? Not quite correct? Not quite complete?
Not quite getting the point of the question? What? You made a far bigger
assumption of knowledge than I ever did, in assuming that non-MS people
would have a clue what "Autoresolution" means.

As I said, if the OP wasn't clear about HOW to leave it at that, he'd
undoubtedly post back, just as he would if he was unclear about anything
else that's assumed knowledge. These are conversations, not text books.

Mark

Feel free to consider it just semantics if you want. My only point was
and remains that switching from autocompletion to autoresolution
requires more deliberate action than you posted. Few users would have
managed to do so. Usage studies show that for most users creating email
is a keyboard activity.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Well it's semantics then - "leave it at that" means "leave it at
that", not "allow it to be autocompleted". My crime was not explaining
HOW to leave it at that it appears?

I don't accept that "most" tab from field to field. I rarely do,
because it takes too long to get to the next field I actually want.
Instead I click where I want to be. I've not specifically watched to
see how people do it, but don't remember seeing anyone tab from field
to field.

Mark

It wouldn't have worked because the autocompletion list is invoked
after typing only one letter. If he had typed 2 letters and "left it
at that" nothing would have happened (note: he said he still had 2
autocompletion suggestions left after typing in 2 letters). If he had
then tabbed out of the field (which is the way most people exit the
To: field), the topmost autocompletion suggestion would have been
selected. Autoresolution would never have been invoked. He would have
had to hit "Esc" or have clicked out of the field to invoke
autoresolution--something very few users do.

Suggesting a user try autoresolution instead of autocompletion to
accomplish what they want is exactly the right solution. But doing so
is a lot trickier and confusing than it should be.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
The thing is though Russ, I can't see why it wouldn't work as
originally written? I admit I assumed that the user knew how to
"type kr and leave it at that", but then I also assumed he knows how
to do lots of things in Outlook. I relied on him to come back and
ask if he doesn't know how to do one of the steps. But given that
assumption, it works fine exactly as written doesn't it?

I only thought you were being a little picky because what I wrote
was correct. Lacking in detail for an absolute beginner maybe, but
the OP didn't sound like one of those to me, and at the end of the
day we all have to assume a certain level of knowledge or we'd be
constantly saying "take the mouse in your right hand........etc" ;)
All I missed out really was how to not accept an auto complete
suggestion.

However, I do accept that you may have some experience that tells
you that most users would have found my post incomplete, when I
don't.

I think we may have to agree to disagree on this, as in the end
we're both just trying to help ;)

Mark

I wasn't being picky. I was pointing out that your suggestion to use
autoresolution (aka Automatic Name checking) instead of
autocompletion, while a good one, would not have worked as written
because autoresolution would not have been invoked. I wasn't trying
to post a comprehensive clarification of the difference for the
original poster because I knew you were perfectly capable of doing
that, and have.

I quite agree that it is not necessary for most users to know which
feature they are using or why. But because of the way Microsoft
implemented its newer autocompletion feature (which does not use
Contacts data) as the front door to its older autoresolution
feature (which does), most users are now hopelessly confused by
this whole area of automatic address selection. Users who prefer
the older autoresolution feature (Microsoft calls it that, not I)
are often unable to invoke it until they turn off autocompletion,
even though that is not necessary.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Point taken, though I think it's a tiny bit picky, especially as
your "Not quite" comment didn't offer any clarification for the OP
at all, and as there's nowhere in the interface that calls
automatic name checking "auto resolution". Telling him to turn off
auto completion and use auto resolution instead would have left
him totally confused (and me) ;) I don't see that it matters
whether or not he sees my solution as a separate feature, so long
as it works for him.

Users don't tend to think "which feature shall I use and what's it
called?". They think "what steps do I need to follow to get this
damn thing working as I expect".

I wouldn't suggest turning auto complete off anyway, as it's a
very useful feature in it's own right, and doesn't stop you from
using auto resolution (I still prefer to call it automatic name
checking).

Edited version of my original post below for the benefit of the
OP:

AUTO COMPLETE IS more of a recently used list than a look-up list.

INSTEAD, if you type "kr" and leave it at that BY CLICKING IN THE
BODY OF THE MESSAGE OR IN ANOTHER NAME FIELD, RATHER THAN ON ANY
OF THE SUGGESTIONS, the letters should get a red underline after a
while, and you can then right click and get a full list.

Alternatively, just put in kr, and then CLICK send WITHOUT
CLICKING ON ANY OF THE AUTO COMPLETE SUGGESTIONS. So long as you
have "Automatic
name checking" enabled in Tools>Options>E-mail Options>Advanced
E-mail
Options you should be prompted with a full list when you hit send.

Mark

message I agree. You asked what is more helpful. I suspect that what is
more helpful is to provide complete information that you are
suggesting he use a different feature and how to invoke it. Most
users do not know that both features exist and get the two
confused all the time. He will likely not even discover
autoresolution unless he turns autocompletion off since
autocompletion kicks in immediately and is hard to override unless
you know how.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
Exactly - auto completion doesn't do what he wants, so I
described the alternatives.

Q - "I can't get my car to do more than 40mph in second gear.
It's really frustrating, I need to go faster; please help".

Two possible answers:

"You won't get it to go faster as 2nd gear doesn't support that"

or

"Second gear won't do it, but try 3rd and then 4th, that should
do what you want".

Which is the most helpful?

Mark

message Not quite. You are describing autoresolution.
The original poster was asking about autocompletion.
The two features are completely different.
--
Russ Valentine
[MVP-Outlook]
It's more of a recently used list than a look-up list.

If you type "kr" and leave it at that, the letters should get
a red underline after a while, and you can then right click
and get a full list.

Alternatively, just put in kr, and then send. So long as you
have "Automatic name checking" enabled in Tools>Options>E-mail
Options>Advanced E-mail Options you should be prompted with a
full list when you hit send.

Mark

Why don't the names of all relevant contacts for which I have
email addresses appear in the suggestion list as I type the
first letters of an address.

Example: I have four contacts whose names and email addresses
begin with kr [kris] but only two of those show up on the
autocomplete list if I type "kr" [or simply "k"].

TIA
 
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