Windows 11 Are you using Windows 11 yet?

Abarbarian

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Quite so, quite so :D Only trouble is, forgive me for being cynical but any integrated 'security' in a MS OS just says to me 'Even more spying'.

Here's my test that from the software that Evan linked to:

Any reason why you are using the old fashioned legacy boot and partitioning ? UEFI and GPT are way easier to use. :cool:
 
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Sadly it won't be an OS I can use. It will cost me around £4,000 to update my laptops and pc's to a spec that Windows 11 can use. And bear in in mind all that will do is let me run the same programmes that I am already running very happily with Windows 10.
I can't see my office spending out £15,000 just to run the new OS either - again all running fairly recent machines.
Sorry Microsoft, this is Windows 8 all over again.
 
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Windows 11, the truth and nothing but the truth: It's amazing the chatter about Win 11 going on and "are you using it" or "will I be able to upgrade to it", and on and on and on. First, as you probably know, Microsoft initially came out with a severely flawed "PC Health Check" tool to determine if your PC could support Win 11. It should have been named The Terminator because 99% of the machines that ran it would fail. MS has recently come out with a "revamped" tool (you have to be a member of the Insider Program to download it). But let me get to the crux of the whole issue with whether or not you can run Win 11 on your current Windows 10 machine. There were two ways to run Win 11, one way is If you have a PC that completely supports the requirements for Win 11 and the other is to install Win 11 using an ISO from Microsoft's Insider Program (there's also a few 3rd-party sites offing ISO downloads for Win 11 as well). The latter method is how most users running Win 10 have been able to run Win 11 on hardware that does NOT strictly comply with all of the Win 11 stated requirements. The initial ISOs from Microsoft have "relaxed" hardware (and software) requirements for installing Win 11 and are designed to access Win 11 on hardware that does not actually fully support Win 11. So you can install the Win 11 ISO on a machine that does not fully meet the Win 11 requirements. Microsoft is aware that many Win 10 users have installed the Win 11 ISO and think they can stay with it going forward on hardware that is "non-compliant". However - and this is a big however - Microsoft has recently stated that anyone running Win 11 ISO's from the Insider Program will be bumped back down to Win 10 (by way of Win 11 updates) if their machines are not compliant. So Microsoft has closed this back-door into installing Win 11 on machines that are not compliant. But, the straw that breaks the camel's back with non-compliant hardware is not so much whether your machine has TPM 2.0 (many do), or whether your mother board has a UEFI bios (many do) or whether it supports Secure Boot (many do) but whether the processor is on Microsoft's list of "approved" processors. So to put this another way, you can't run the retail release of Win 11 on a machine that does not have a processor on Microsoft's approved processor list. So far, MS has allowed some 2nd gen AMD Ryzen, selected 7th gen Intel, and mainly 8th gen Intel processors. In short, even if your PC meets 99% of the Win 11 requirements, if the processor is not one that is on the approved list of processors, your are for all intents and purposes, screwed. And again, even if you're running Win 11 now on non-compliant hardware, you will eventually be bumped back down to Win 10 by MS.

As the scribe for the great Pharaoh Rameses would say... So shall it be written, so shall it be said! GONGgggggg...
 
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EvanDavis

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At the time none of my computers, main PC, 3 x crunchers and 1 x laptop were compatible with Windows 11. With 4 of them it was the CPU and the laptop didn't have TPM. At the time of this thread start there were no decent tutorials to get them runniing on unsported hardware. I recently go a Samsung Galaxy Book Go with Windows 11 on it. It's supr fast for the spec and I really like Windows 11. So I decided to give it a crack and try again to install Windows 11 on the other unsupported machines. I cam across THIS video and have now installed W11 on my main PC and 2 x crunching machines. Can't install it on the 3rd cruncher as try as I might I can't get it to boot from USB. So far I am liking W11. My main PC seems a lot faster. I also seem to be getting all the same updates as my Galaxy Book Go. The only issue I have is I use Microsoft Mouse Without Borders with my main PC and one of my crunchers and when I move the mouse pointer over to my crunching machine screen the mouse pointer isn't on top of what ever wwindow is open. Not really a massive issue because it still highlights what ever you move it to. Like I say I like W11 so far :)
 

Captain Jack Sparrow

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Absolutely hate Windows 11 with a passion. It makes almost all of my perfectly good hardware obsolete due to unsupported CPUs and lack of TPM 2.0. The UI is also disgraceful imo.

When it’s judgement day for Windows 10, I’m not gonna do any botched workarounds to install Windows 11 on unsupported hardware. Looks like I’ll still be using Windows 10 long after the EOL date.

I am using the Education/Enterprise editions of Windows 10, so I think I might get slightly longer support. Regardless, I can see Windows 10 support being extended, I’m not expecting many companies to migrate to Windows 11 so quickly.
 

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