XP Home Addition Upgrade Question


G

Guest

My daughter bought XP Upgrade addition for her computer, but it seems like
she has a virus on her computer. Can we wipe it clean (fdisk) then install
the Home Addition Upgrade, or do we need to put something like 98 on it first
before we install the upgrade. When she bought the computer, they didn't give
her a disk for her Windows program.
 
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M

Maurice N ~ MVP

Hello,
Please provide more information & do not do anything just yet.
I am not personally familiar with "Addition Upgrade", but then I could be behind the current curve.

Is this an "academic" edition? or ? {Maybe it's the Upgrade "edition" }
Can you please post back the exact Title on "this" upgrade CD?
In any event, exactly "what" was provided with the pc?
I assume this system currently has Windows XP, right? if so, is it Home edition or PRO edition?

Does this pc currently have an antivirus program?

I would not "wipe" the system at this time.

Run an online virus scan: http://www.pandasoftware.com/activescan/

After scanning, you'll see an option to create a log afer the scan has finished.
Click the "See Report" button then click the "Save Report" button.

It will be saved with the name "activescan.txt"

Let us know the results.
 
B

Bruce Chambers

ladygarnet said:
My daughter bought XP Upgrade addition for her computer, but it seems like
she has a virus on her computer. Can we wipe it clean (fdisk) then install
the Home Addition Upgrade, or do we need to put something like 98 on it first
before we install the upgrade. When she bought the computer, they didn't give
her a disk for her Windows program.


It's quite possible to perform a clean installation using the WinXP
Upgrade CD, provided you have the true installation CD for the earlier OS.

Simply boot from the WinXP Upgrade CD. You'll be offered the
opportunity to delete, create, and format partitions as part of the
installation process. The Upgrade CD checks to see if a qualifying OS
is installed, and, if it finds none, it asks you to insert the
installation media (CD) of that OS. Unfortunately, an OEM
"Recovery/Restore" CD will not work for this purpose; you must have a
true installation CD, complete with the "\Win98" folder and *.cab
files, or the "\i386" folder of WinNT/2K.

However, have you made sure that your PC's hardware components are
capable of supporting WinXP? This information will be found at the PC's
manufacturer's web site, and on Microsoft's Windows Catalog:
(http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/hcl/default.mspx) Additionally, run
Microsoft WinXP Upgrade Advisor to see if you have any incompatible
hardware components or applications.

You should, before proceeding, take a few minutes to ensure that
there are WinXP device drivers available for all of the machine's
components. There may not be, if the PC was specifically designed for
Win98/Me. Also bear in mind that PCs designed for, sold and run fine
with Win9x/Me very often do not meet WinXP's much more stringent
hardware quality requirements. This is particularly true of many
models in Compaq's consumer-class Presario product line or HP's
consumer-class Pavilion product line. WinXP, like WinNT and Win2K
before it, is quite sensitive to borderline defective or substandard
hardware (particularly motherboards, RAM and hard drives) that will
still support Win9x.

HOW TO Prepare to Upgrade Win98 or WinMe
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;Q316639

Upgrading to Windows XP
http://aumha.org/win5/a/xpupgrad.htm


--

Bruce Chambers

Help us help you:



They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. -Benjamin Franklin

Many people would rather die than think; in fact, most do. -Bertrum Russell
 
G

Guest

She bought a dell system and the store she purchased it from put Windows 2000
Professional and didn't give her a OS disk. Would it be possible to wipe the
system clean, install my old 98 and then install the upgrade?

Her system meets the requirements for the XP upgrade.

The reason I wanted to wipe the system clean is that they have a virus on it
and clean it completely and then re-install everything.
 
D

Daave

ladygarnet said:
She bought a dell system and the store she purchased it from put
Windows 2000 Professional and didn't give her a OS disk. Would it be
possible to wipe the system clean, install my old 98 and then install
the upgrade?

If your "old 98" is a full retail version of Windows 98, then yes, it's
possible. But just to be on the safe side, please identify this disc for
us.
The reason I wanted to wipe the system clean is that they have a
virus on it and clean it completely and then re-install everything.

That's pretty drastic. Why not just remove the virus?
 
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K

Ken Blake

She bought a dell system and the store she purchased it from put Windows
2000
Professional and didn't give her a OS disk. Would it be possible to wipe
the
system clean, install my old 98 and then install the upgrade?


Yes, but as Bruce said, it's completely unnecessary.

The requirement to use an upgrade version is to *own* a previous qualifying
version's installation CD (with an OEM restore CD, see below), not to have
it installed. When setup doesn't find a previous qualifying version
installed, it will prompt you to insert its CD as proof of ownership. Just
insert the previous version's CD, and follow the prompts. Everything
proceeds quite normally and quite legitimately.

You can also do a clean installation if you have an OEM restore CD of a
previous qualifying version. It's more complicated, but it *can* be done.
First restore from the Restore CD. Then run the XP upgrade CD from within
that restored system, and change from Upgrade to New Install. When it asks
where, press Esc to delete the partition and start over.

Her system meets the requirements for the XP upgrade.

The reason I wanted to wipe the system clean is that they have a virus on
it
and clean it completely and then re-install everything.


A clean reinstallation in response to a virus is hardly ever necessary and
is almost always *way* overkill. Have you at least tried to remove the virus
using normal anti-virus software?
 
D

Daave

The requirement to use an upgrade version is to *own* a previous
qualifying version's installation CD (with an OEM restore CD, see
below), not to have it installed. When setup doesn't find a previous
qualifying version installed, it will prompt you to insert its CD as
proof of ownership.

I'm confused. If someone does not have the original installation (or
reinstallation) CD but still has a Windows 2000 or ME or 98 operating
system on their computer, why won't setup recognize it as a qualifying
version having been installed? Or does it automatically prompt for the
disc regardless?
A clean reinstallation in response to a virus is hardly ever necessary
and is almost always *way* overkill. Have you at least tried to remove
the virus using normal anti-virus software?


Agreed. The OP is making it *way* more difficult than it needs to be!
 
G

Guest

I tried to clean it with norton anti-virus, but it didn't clean it.It did
recognize it. The definitions are completely up to date. Any suggestions to
a better program?

BTW, I really appreciate all the help you guys are giving.
 
D

Daave

ladygarnet said:
I tried to clean it with norton anti-virus, but it didn't clean it.It
did recognize it. The definitions are completely up to date. Any
suggestions to a better program?


I am partial to a freeware program called AVG Anti-Virus Free:

http://free.grisoft.com/doc/avg-anti-virus-free/lng/us/tpl/v5

No need to pay for the commercial version; just click on the "Download
free version" link. You can also create boot disks, which are very
helpful.

You stated that Norton recognized the virus. Which one is it? As
mentioned by others in this thread, there are a number of free online
scans available. Speaking of Norton, here's a link to their online scan
Web page:

http://security.symantec.com/sscv6/default.asp?langid=ie&venid=sym
 
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K

Ken Blake

Daave said:
I'm confused. If someone does not have the original installation (or
reinstallation) CD but still has a Windows 2000 or ME or 98 operating
system on their computer, why won't setup recognize it as a qualifying
version having been installed?


It does.

Or does it automatically prompt for the
disc regardless?


No, it prompts for the CD *only* if no qualifying version is installed.
 
K

Ken Blake

ladygarnet said:
I tried to clean it with norton anti-virus, but it didn't clean it.It
did recognize it. The definitions are completely up to date. Any
suggestions to a better program?


What virus is it. Where is it (in what folder)? How do you know you have
this virus (what program is telling you)?


BTW, I really appreciate all the help you guys are giving.


You're welcome. Glad to help.

--
Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
Please reply to the newsgroup

 
D

Daave

Ken Blake said:

I'm still confused because first you said:

I'm guessing you mean that if you once owned the CD but since lost it,
you should still be fine as long as the OS is still installed on your
system. Do I have it right?
 
K

Ken Blake

Daave said:
I'm still confused because first you said:


I'm guessing you mean that if you once owned the CD but since lost it,
you should still be fine as long as the OS is still installed on your
system. Do I have it right?


Sorry if I confused you. What I meant is that you have to own it and prove
you own it. You can prove it in either of two ways: the installer sees it
installed on the drive, or you insert the CD as proof of ownership when
prompted to do so.

The second way is used for clean installations with the Upgrade version, the
first way (usually) for upgrades.

Both the Full and Upgrade versions can do either a clean installation or an
Upgrade (but not an OEM version, which can do only clean installations). The
only difference between the two is that for a clean installation, you have
to provide that proof of ownership.
 
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D

Daave

Ken said:
Sorry if I confused you. What I meant is that you have to own it and
prove you own it. You can prove it in either of two ways: the
installer sees it installed on the drive, or you insert the CD as
proof of ownership when prompted to do so.

The second way is used for clean installations with the Upgrade
version, the first way (usually) for upgrades.

Both the Full and Upgrade versions can do either a clean
installation or an Upgrade (but not an OEM version, which can do only
clean installations). The only difference between the two is that for
a clean installation, you have to provide that proof of ownership.

I understand better now. :)

One last question:

Assuming the old disc is long gone but the qualifying OS is installed on
the PC, a person buys an Upgrade (not Full) version of XP. They choose
the "upgrade" (not clean) installation option. The upgrade is
successful. Now in the event that down the road, the person wants to
wipe the disc clean and do a fresh install using the same XP upgrade
disc, would this be possible?
 
K

Ken Blake

Daave said:
I understand better now. :)

One last question:

Assuming the old disc is long gone but the qualifying OS is installed
on the PC, a person buys an Upgrade (not Full) version of XP. They
choose the "upgrade" (not clean) installation option. The upgrade is
successful. Now in the event that down the road, the person wants to
wipe the disc clean and do a fresh install using the same XP upgrade
disc, would this be possible?


Nope. You can't install an Upgrade version cleanly without a previous
qualifying version. However in the scenario you describe, you *could* buy a
used copy of Windows 98 (there are very cheap now) and use that.
 
D

Daave

Ken said:
Nope. You can't install an Upgrade version cleanly without a previous
qualifying version. However in the scenario you describe, you *could*
buy a used copy of Windows 98 (there are very cheap now) and use that.

Gotcha. Thanks!
 
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