wireless router


J

JackN

One desktop computer on a NTL modem. Modem has an Ethernet socket. To use
broadband on another desktopi want to use a wireless router. Do I just
connect the router to the modem with a suitable cable and plug the receiver
into the other PC? Surely it can't be that simple.
 
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S

spodosaurus

JackN said:
One desktop computer on a NTL modem.
Is this a cable modem? ADSL? what?
Modem has an Ethernet socket.
I assume you're using that ethernet socket to connect the modem to your
computer...or is it usb as well?
To use
broadband on another desktopi want to use a wireless router. Do I just
connect the router to the modem with a suitable cable and plug the receiver
into the other PC? Surely it can't be that simple.
It isn't that simple. You have to install drivers for the wireless card
on the other PC. You also have to set up the wireless network, both from
within the router's web interface and the PC's software so that the two
play nice together and you don't have your neighbours downloading porn
over your connection with their wireless cards (at least WEP, preferably
WPA security).

You also have to know how you are logging in to your ISP. Does the modem
handle this, or is your desktop computer handling this? I've got my ADSL
modem set in bridge mode (connecting to my wireless router's internet
port via ethernet cable) so that my wireless router handles logon and
everything else.

It is fairly simple to accomplish as long as you're ready to get things
set up before you start. Post back with some more information and I'm
sure we can make the process go as smoothly, and securely, as possible.

Cheers,

Ari

--
spammage trappage: replace fishies_ with yahoo

I'm going to die rather sooner than I'd like. I tried to protect my
neighbours from crime, and became the victim of it. To jump to the end
of the story, as a result of this I need a bone marrow transplant. Many
people around the world are waiting for a marrow transplant, too. Please
volunteer to be a marrow donor:
http://www.abmdr.org.au/
http://www.marrow.org/
 
J

JackN

NTL (UK) is an external ADSL cable modem connected to the computer via a USB
cable. On the modem there is an Ethernet socket.

I am assuming that the modem connects/logs when the computer is switched on
as the green LEDs on it are constantly flickering (not very technical!My own
PC is not on cable broadband but through BT telephone broadband)

The idea is to connect another computer without having leads trailing all
over the house.

I know about drivers etc it's just that the hardware set up is new to me.

Correct me if I'm wrong. I think that I need a wireless router. This is
connected to the modem with an Ethernet cable (RJ45?). A wireless USB
receiver in the remote desktop PC connects me to the router. Install
drivers/software and I'm up and running..
 
S

spodosaurus

JackN said:
NTL (UK) is an external ADSL cable modem connected to the computer via a USB
cable. On the modem there is an Ethernet socket.
Does your ISP require a username and password? I ask because if the
modem takes care of this for you, you'll probably have an easier time.
Just go into the modem's browser based configuration screens and set it
to bridge mode (or equivalent). Then connect the modem to the router and
the router to your desktop (you have to have at least one wired
connection for initial router setup). In the process of setting up the
router, you'll enter your username and password so the router can handle
logon for you.

It *might* help to know which router you have, in case someone here is
experienced with the browser based configuration menus for that
particular router.

I am assuming that the modem connects/logs when the computer is switched on
as the green LEDs on it are constantly flickering (not very technical!My own
PC is not on cable broadband but through BT telephone broadband)

The idea is to connect another computer without having leads trailing all
over the house.
That's precisely why I went to a router with built in wireless, too.
I know about drivers etc it's just that the hardware set up is new to me.

Correct me if I'm wrong. I think that I need a wireless router. This is
connected to the modem with an Ethernet cable (RJ45?). A wireless USB
receiver in the remote desktop PC connects me to the router. Install
drivers/software and I'm up and running..
For hardware, yes. But there are specific software configuration
settings involved as well, such as security settings, SSID, logon, etc.


--
spammage trappage: replace fishies_ with yahoo

I'm going to die rather sooner than I'd like. I tried to protect my
neighbours from crime, and became the victim of it. To jump to the end
of the story, as a result of this I need a bone marrow transplant. Many
people around the world are waiting for a marrow transplant, too. Please
volunteer to be a marrow donor:
http://www.abmdr.org.au/
http://www.marrow.org/
 
J

JackN

I haven't got a router yet. It's just an idea at the moment. Whilst we're on
the subject any routers recommended o, alternatively any to stay clear of?
 
S

spodosaurus

JackN said:
I haven't got a router yet. It's just an idea at the moment. Whilst we're on
the subject any routers recommended o, alternatively any to stay clear of?
I love netgear routers. First a wired one with print server and now a
wireless one (without print server, didn't have the extra $100AUD for
it). The one I have now is the WGT624, and I've got my wife's computer
in the back office with the WG311T wireless card. This is a superG
router and card combination, so the speeds can be faster if you have
good reception than regular wireless G. Works great. Remember to upgrade
drivers/firmware, as netgear are good at improving their products.

Draytek make good products as well, and I have this from a home and
business networking professional.

You'll probably want to order closer to home, but for those in Australia
www.oztechnologies.com is great.

www.ozcableguy.com has GREAT reviews of a lot of networking gear. I
always use their reviews.

I'd steer well clear of LevelOne products! I bought a wireless usb
adapter, their WNC-0300USB model, and it crashes windows XP SP2 after
about 3 hours EVERY TIME! Complete crap.

There are a lot of routers, with a lot of different features (print
servers are good but not essential, same with detachable antennas, etc
etc).

Cheers,

Ari


--
spammage trappage: replace fishies_ with yahoo

I'm going to die rather sooner than I'd like. I tried to protect my
neighbours from crime, and became the victim of it. To jump to the end
of the story, as a result of this I need a bone marrow transplant. Many
people around the world are waiting for a marrow transplant, too. Please
volunteer to be a marrow donor:
http://www.abmdr.org.au/
http://www.marrow.org/
 
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J

jimbo

The cleanest, easiest way to configure your network would be to connect
the ADSL modem to the new wireless router WAN port. And connect your
local desktop to a LAN port on the router. Then get a wireless adapter
for the remote desktop.

I doubt that you will find a router that has a USB port. So, your local
desktop will need an ethernet port. A PCI card will be very low cost.
And a PCI card with wireless rather than USB may be less costly for
your remote desktop.

If you leave the modem connected to the local desktop, you will need to
use ICS to share the connection with your remote desktop.
Good luck, jimbo
 
M

Matt

JackN said:
Correct me if I'm wrong. I think that I need a wireless router. This is
connected to the modem with an Ethernet cable (RJ45?). A wireless USB
receiver in the remote desktop PC connects me to the router.
By George, I think you've got it.
 
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R

rhys

I love netgear routers. First a wired one with print server and now a
wireless one (without print server, didn't have the extra $100AUD for
it). The one I have now is the WGT624, and I've got my wife's computer
in the back office with the WG311T wireless card. This is a superG
router and card combination, so the speeds can be faster if you have
good reception than regular wireless G. Works great. Remember to upgrade
drivers/firmware, as netgear are good at improving their products.
I've just bought this Netgear combo instead of the equivalent Linksys
combo, which was half as fast. I've got the router talking to the DSL
and (obviously) have full functionality on that end, but I haven't
reconfigured my network yet (got an old PII "archive" machine I will
cable-connect to the router.

Before work distracted me, I had my Dell Inspiron laptop "seeing" the
router via the card, but not the network, so I have some tweaking to
do yet. My ambition is to make better use of the laptop by using it
around the house whilst my kid is watching a video and so on...and I
need connectivity to work. I also want basic connectivity at the
garage 100 feet away so that I can d/l PDFs of engine specs and so on,
and for printing out tabs and lyrics when my musical friends are over
<G>.

I'll post back my results. Connecting the router to the DSL and to the
"main tower" was easy, and it had better be, as this Netgear is
replacing a perfectly good (but not wireless) SMC Barricade which cost
one-quarter of the price and never gave me a moment's trouble.

Only thing I learned was that D-Link make good PCMCIA cards and
standard routers, but that their wireless routers aren't great.
Linksys and Netgear seem to be the quality leaders here.

R.
 

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