Windows 2000 DNS and Linux Clients


G

Guest

I have a Windows 2000 Active Directory. I just added a Linux client. The
linux client is receiving DHCP from my domain controller. I've added an entry
for my linux client in Windows 2000 DNS so now all my Windows machines can
ping the linux machine by its hostname.

I set /etc/resolv.conf on the linux machine to use the correct domain and
nameserver. I also set /etc/host.conf: order bind, hosts and
/etc/nsswitch.conf: hosts: dns files

This is the wierd part. From the linux machine I can ping stuff on the
internet (like Google) however, I can't ping anything inside my local network
by hostname. I even tried pinging using the fully qualified domain name but
still no luck.

Now it gets really wierd. If I use nslookup on the linux machine I can query
query local hostnames and it works fine. So why does that work but ping
doesn't?
 
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G

Guest

Okay, after lots of research I fixed my own problem. The problem was due to
the fact that I'm using the .local suffix in my Windows domain. Aparently
SUSE Linux doesn't like this or rather libresolv doesn't like this. Programs
like ping use libresolv but other programs like nslookup don't. Here's what I
did at my linux machine:

cd /lib
cp libresolv.so.2 libresolv.so.2-orig
rm libresolv.so.2
cp libresolv.so.2-orig libresolv.so.2
perl -pi -e 's/local/lozal/g' libresolv.so.2
shutdown -r 0

I have no idea what that does or why it works but it did. I can now ping
all the machines in my local network by hostname.
 
A

Ace Fekay [MVP]

In
BlenderStyle said:
Okay, after lots of research I fixed my own problem. The problem was
due to the fact that I'm using the .local suffix in my Windows
domain. Aparently SUSE Linux doesn't like this or rather libresolv
doesn't like this. Programs like ping use libresolv but other
programs like nslookup don't. Here's what I did at my linux machine:

cd /lib
cp libresolv.so.2 libresolv.so.2-orig
rm libresolv.so.2
cp libresolv.so.2-orig libresolv.so.2
perl -pi -e 's/local/lozal/g' libresolv.so.2
shutdown -r 0

I have no idea what that does or why it works but it did. I can now
ping all the machines in my local network by hostname.

"BlenderStyle" wrote:

I don't play much with Linux, but I can comment on one of my customers using
numerous Mac OSx systems in their environment, which is BSD based and has
the same problem as Linux in this respect because Mac, for it's Rendezvous
name, uses .local. We overcame that by jumping thru a few hoops early on.

Glad you figured it out.

--
Ace

This posting is provided "AS-IS" with no warranties or guarantees and
confers no rights.

Having difficulty reading or finding responses to your post?
Instead of the website you're using, I suggest to use OEx (Outlook Express
or any other newsreader), and configure a news account, pointing to
news.microsoft.com. This is a direct link to the Microsoft Public
Newsgroups. It is FREE and requires NO ISP's Usenet account. OEx allows you
to easily find, track threads, cross-post, sort by date, poster's name,
watched threads or subject.

It's easy:
How to Configure OEx for Internet News
http://support.microsoft.com/?id=171164

Ace Fekay, MCSE 2003 & 2000, MCSA 2003 & 2000, MCSE+I, MCT, MVP
Microsoft MVP - Directory Services
Microsoft Certified Trainer

Infinite Diversities in Infinite Combinations
Assimilation Imminent. Resistance is Futile
"Very funny Scotty. Now, beam down my clothes."

The only thing in life is change. Anything more is a blackhole consuming
unnecessary energy. - [Me]
 
K

Kurt

That is really interesting. I use Redhat (Fedora) for numerous things in our
operation and have never had a problem with .local as the DNS suffix. In
fact it's been my tradition to use .local for Windows AD setups for years.
I'll definitely file both of these posts away for future reference.

For the OP:

I'm not a perl programmer, but one could assume that after making a backup
of your original libresolv.so.2 file it replaces references to "local" with
"lozal".

....kurt


"Ace Fekay [MVP]"
In
BlenderStyle said:
Okay, after lots of research I fixed my own problem. The problem was
due to the fact that I'm using the .local suffix in my Windows
domain. Aparently SUSE Linux doesn't like this or rather libresolv
doesn't like this. Programs like ping use libresolv but other
programs like nslookup don't. Here's what I did at my linux machine:

cd /lib
cp libresolv.so.2 libresolv.so.2-orig
rm libresolv.so.2
cp libresolv.so.2-orig libresolv.so.2
perl -pi -e 's/local/lozal/g' libresolv.so.2
shutdown -r 0

I have no idea what that does or why it works but it did. I can now
ping all the machines in my local network by hostname.

"BlenderStyle" wrote:

I don't play much with Linux, but I can comment on one of my customers
using numerous Mac OSx systems in their environment, which is BSD based
and has the same problem as Linux in this respect because Mac, for it's
Rendezvous name, uses .local. We overcame that by jumping thru a few hoops
early on.

Glad you figured it out.

--
Ace

This posting is provided "AS-IS" with no warranties or guarantees and
confers no rights.

Having difficulty reading or finding responses to your post?
Instead of the website you're using, I suggest to use OEx (Outlook Express
or any other newsreader), and configure a news account, pointing to
news.microsoft.com. This is a direct link to the Microsoft Public
Newsgroups. It is FREE and requires NO ISP's Usenet account. OEx allows
you to easily find, track threads, cross-post, sort by date, poster's
name, watched threads or subject.

It's easy:
How to Configure OEx for Internet News
http://support.microsoft.com/?id=171164

Ace Fekay, MCSE 2003 & 2000, MCSA 2003 & 2000, MCSE+I, MCT, MVP
Microsoft MVP - Directory Services
Microsoft Certified Trainer

Infinite Diversities in Infinite Combinations
Assimilation Imminent. Resistance is Futile
"Very funny Scotty. Now, beam down my clothes."

The only thing in life is change. Anything more is a blackhole consuming
unnecessary energy. - [Me]
 
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A

Ace Fekay [MVP]

In
Kurt said:
That is really interesting. I use Redhat (Fedora) for numerous things
in our operation and have never had a problem with .local as the DNS
suffix. In fact it's been my tradition to use .local for Windows AD
setups for years. I'll definitely file both of these posts away for
future reference.

I can tell you it sure was a learning experience with Macs and Rendezvous!

Ace
 

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