What software would I need to make a very small backup?


M

Metspitzer

What software would I need to make a very small backup?

I have an open office file that I write to often. I would like to
have it backed up to a flash drive every time I save it.

What would be the simplest (automatic) way to do this?
I want a copy on the desktop and a backup on a flash drive.
 
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P

Paul

Metspitzer said:
What software would I need to make a very small backup?

I have an open office file that I write to often. I would like to
have it backed up to a flash drive every time I save it.

What would be the simplest (automatic) way to do this?
I want a copy on the desktop and a backup on a flash drive.

It sounds like you might want a synchronizer. Since you
didn't mention keeping *revisions* of the file, but just
keeping the current one.

If you save the file, with a slightly different name each
time, the sync tool of choice can always copy over that
file as well. You'd set up your syncing, to sync an
entire folder created just for that purpose.

"Synctoy (Microsoft download)"
http://www.mydigitallife.info/free-sync-software-for-xp-and-vista-synctoy/

(You can get your copy here)

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=15155

HTH,
Paul
 
K

Ken Springer

What software would I need to make a very small backup?

I have an open office file that I write to often. I would like to
have it backed up to a flash drive every time I save it.

What would be the simplest (automatic) way to do this?
I want a copy on the desktop and a backup on a flash drive.

For just one file, I'd just use Save and Save As rather than install a
piece of software.

FWIW, if it's not detrimental to the document, I always put the date
printed, filename and date, and software w/ version # used in the lower
right corner in the footer, 4 pt. text. Makes it a lot easier to figure
out what you used/did when you look at a printed copy 6 months later.


--
Ken

Mac OS X 10.8.5
Firefox 24.0
Thunderbird 17.0.8
 
N

Nil

What software would I need to make a very small backup?

I have an open office file that I write to often. I would like to
have it backed up to a flash drive every time I save it.

What would be the simplest (automatic) way to do this?
I want a copy on the desktop and a backup on a flash drive.

COPY

or

XCOPY
 
J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

In message <[email protected]>, Ken Springer
FWIW, if it's not detrimental to the document, I always put the date
printed, filename and date, and software w/ version # used in the lower
right corner in the footer, 4 pt. text. Makes it a lot easier to
figure out what you used/did when you look at a printed copy 6 months
later.
FWIW, in real Word (not sure about Open Office), there's an automatic
way of including the date (formatted however you like, so it can include
the time) on which a file was saved. I'm not sure how to invoke it: I
include the (current) date, the use toggle codes and change DATE to
SAVEDATE then toggle back.

Many people at my employer - I think it's in the templates - just use
the current date; this is most irritating if you retrieve a file from
the server and print it (or even just look at it on screen): it always
of course thus shows the date on which it was printed, not saved, which
is somewhat confusing.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)[email protected]+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

They'd never heard of me; they didn't like me; they didn't like my speech;
they tutted and clucked and looked at their watches and eventually I sat down
to a thunderous lack of applause. - Barry Norman (on preceding Douglas Bader),
in RT 6-12 July 2013
 
K

Ken Springer

In message <[email protected]>, Ken Springer

FWIW, in real Word (not sure about Open Office), there's an automatic
way of including the date (formatted however you like, so it can include
the time) on which a file was saved. I'm not sure how to invoke it: I
include the (current) date, the use toggle codes and change DATE to
SAVEDATE then toggle back.

That may be in the document properties, which I think can be printed as
an option. But, you may not want that information in the finished
product. Libre Office, a branch of Open Office, let's you do that too,
I think. I've given up on LO due to bugs that affect how I use the
program not being fixed, and there being no interest/effort at fixing them.

In the footer, I don't just print the date. I have text that says
"Printed on" and then the printed date field to display the current
date. You do have to remember to "lock" the document when finished so
that date does not change when you load the document a few days/months
later.
Many people at my employer - I think it's in the templates - just use
the current date; this is most irritating if you retrieve a file from
the server and print it (or even just look at it on screen): it always
of course thus shows the date on which it was printed, not saved, which
is somewhat confusing.

Companies, IMO, need to be more knowledgeable about how software works
to avoid this kind of problem. Computers should make life easier, but
lack of knowledge about how things like this work seems to be making
things harder than they should be, which is a negative for workforce
efficiency.


--
Ken

Mac OS X 10.8.5
Firefox 24.0
Thunderbird 17.0.8
 
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J

jim

Metspitzer said:
What software would I need to make a very small backup?

I have an open office file that I write to often. I would like to
have it backed up to a flash drive every time I save it.

What would be the simplest (automatic) way to do this?
I want a copy on the desktop and a backup on a flash drive.

Just a straight forward copy to the flash drive .
 
B

BillW50

In Metspitzer typed:
What software would I need to make a very small backup?

I have an open office file that I write to often. I would like to
have it backed up to a flash drive every time I save it.

What would be the simplest (automatic) way to do this?
I want a copy on the desktop and a backup on a flash drive.

When you get tired of the slowness and the limitations of Synctoy, you
might want to check out SyncBack. I tried many utilities like this
before and this is the only one I would recommend. They take syncing
seriously.

SyncBack (free version)
http://www.2brightsparks.com/download-syncbackfree.html
 
R

RobertMacy

What software would I need to make a very small backup?

I have an open office file that I write to often. I would like to
have it backed up to a flash drive every time I save it.

What would be the simplest (automatic) way to do this?
I want a copy on the desktop and a backup on a flash drive.

Do you really mean every time you save it or every time you're done with
it and save it?

The latter I do with a folder containing some 2000+ files that each day a
few files either get modified or a few new ones are added.

After a debacle of thinking I backed these up on two separate HD's and
having 8 HD's fail within a two year period - faster then I could glean
all their information; I learned to 'backup' these files [not really a
backup, but up to date copies] these files onto four different locations:
HD C:, HD D:, thumb stick, HD WinXP machine turned on once in a while.

I solved my problem by writing a small group of batch files, and placing
the shortcut to appropriate batchfiles on the desktop. Simply double
clicking on the icon does it all.

For the WinXP system I had to insert a PAUSE command to keep the screen up
until I could read the files that had copied. Also, not sure if you need
to or not, but I name all files with contiguous filenames, no spaces. This
is a carryover from older times not sure it is necessary for the batch to
work or not.

There are different batch files for each task. C to D, D to F, F to C and
so on.


this batch file is labeled C to D

echo off
echo C to D disk
verify on
xcopy C:\AAA\$Contacts\*.* D:\AAA\$Contacts\*.* /D /E /C /H /Y
echo on

I think verify on has little significance, though.
 
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K

Ken Blake, MVP

Is there a way to simply download this software without installing?

I went to their website and it wants to run? Setup.exe which sounds like a
'seed' program to then grab all the related stuff during an install.

Or, is 'Setup.exe' the download and does not install until and if you want
it?



Setup.exe is the file you download. Whether it runs automatically
after downloading depends on your browser and how you set it. You
normally are given the choice.
 
R

RobertMacy

Setup.exe is the file you download. Whether it runs automatically
after downloading depends on your browser and how you set it. You
normally are given the choice.

Thanks for your response. But does that mean you MUST be online when you
run Setup? Or is this 'self-contained' software?

I don't often put the WinXP online, and its a big hastle to do so. I'd
like to just 'park' the sw on the disk until I need it and not install
unless, and if, I go to use it.
 
B

BillW50

In RobertMacy typed:
Is there a way to simply download this software without installing?

I went to their website and it wants to run? Setup.exe which sounds
like a 'seed' program to then grab all the related stuff during an
install.
Or, is 'Setup.exe' the download and does not install until and if you
want it?

Yes, that is the single file installer. Once you download it and want to
keep the installer, I would rename it to "Syncback_setup.exe" or
something. And it won't install until you run it.
 
B

BillW50

In RobertMacy typed:
Thanks for your response. But does that mean you MUST be online when
you run Setup? Or is this 'self-contained' software?

I don't often put the WinXP online, and its a big hastle to do so. I'd
like to just 'park' the sw on the disk until I need it and not
install unless, and if, I go to use it.

No, you don't have to be online to run it. As it's self-contained.
 
K

Ken Blake, MVP

Thanks for your response. But does that mean you MUST be online when you
run Setup?


No. You must be online to download it. Once it's downloaded, you've
got it and you don't need to be online again.

Or is this 'self-contained' software?


I've lost track of what software you're talking about, but it
essentially doesn't matter. Almost all software is alike in this
regard. Again, once it's downloaded, you've got it and you don't need
to be online again.


I don't often put the WinXP online, and its a big hastle to do so. I'd
like to just 'park' the sw on the disk until I need it and not install
unless, and if, I go to use it.



That seems odd to me, but if that's your choice, fine. That's the way
it is.

Normally, for most of us, we install it immediately after downloading,
but you can postpone that installation for as long as you want to.
 
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R

RobertMacy

..snip...
Yes, that is the single file installer. Once you download it and want to
keep the installer, I would rename it to "Syncback_setup.exe" or
something. And it won't install until you run it.

Perfect! Thanks.
 
R

RobertMacy

No. You must be online to download it. Once it's downloaded, you've
got it and you don't need to be online again.




I've lost track of what software you're talking about, but it
essentially doesn't matter. Almost all software is alike in this
regard. Again, once it's downloaded, you've got it and you don't need
to be online again.

Yes, almost all software EXCEPT stuff from MicroSoft!
 
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J

J. P. Gilliver (John)

RobertMacy <[email protected]> said:
[]
essentially doesn't matter. Almost all software is alike in this
regard. Again, once it's downloaded, you've got it and you don't need
to be online again.
I'd question the "almost all"; I'd agree at "most", but I've encountered
enough where the initial apparent "installer" is really just a (further)
downloader ...
Yes, almost all software EXCEPT stuff from MicroSoft!

.... and not just from them, though they're certainly one of - probably
the - biggest culprit(s).
 

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