My WinXP Backup "System"


K

Kerneldebugger

Hi,

It seems to me a lot of people are going to abandon WinXP when
Microsoft ends support. That is a real shame because WinXP is a
very good OS.

Several of my computers use a dual boot system. The HDDs (hard
disk drive) are "split" into two logical drives, C: and D:. Win98 is
installed on C:. When I install WinXP, I select D: and it creates the
dual
boot system for me during the installation.

I have always "activated" WinXP over the telephone (toll free number).

I install all the aps I normally use in WinXP, and configure settings
in
WinXP and the aps/programs the way I like it. This includes MSCONFIG's
Selective Startups (and a reboot). I turn off "System Restore", I turn
off/disable "automatic updates", and I turn off Hibernation.

I note the number of processes via "Task Manager" that are running which
is
typically 17 to 19 (no anti-virus aps and no WiFi). I keep this
information
as a reference.

Note: I don't use the internet until after I create the backup(s).

Creating Backup(s):

1. I reboot the computer and select "Windows" (98 on C: partition).

2. I create a "BackUp" folder (C:\BACKUP) and in it a "WinXP" sub-folder.

3. Using WinZip 7.0 (I used for many years), I "zip up" the "WINDOWS"
folder in the D: partition creating "WINDOWS.ZIP" in
C:\BACKUPS\WINXP.

4. I repeat step 3 for "Programs Files" and "Documents and Settings"
(located in D: partition).

One Partition HDD Laptop with Only WinXP:

One of my laptops only has WinXP on a single partition. I removed the
HDD
and install it in a "docking station" that you plug into a USB port.
Using
another computer, I connect the docking station (external HDD).

Then I use steps 2 and up, but instead of D:, I select the letter for
my
external HDD in the docking station.

Note: I have USB flash drives and on them are names of different
computers
I have. I copy those 3 .ZIP files to the USB flash drive into a folder
named
after the computer they belong to.

Replacing System Folders if There is a "Problem":

If an issue occurs in WinXP due to malware or other cause, I reboot
the computer and use Win98 in C: or remove the HDD and use a docking
station (WinXP computer with one partition HDD).

1. At Dos Prompt, I go to D: and use the command, "DELTREE WINDOWS",

2. I also use the command, "DELTREE PROGRA~1" and "DELTREE DOCUME~1"
Note: You can use the long filenames, but put them in quotes.

Note: I use "DELTREE" at Dos Prompt so I can create space on the HDD,
otherwise everything goes to the "Recycle Bin" (which of course you can
clear).

3. I use the commands, "MD WINDOWS", "MD "Program Files"", and
"MD "Documents and Settings"".

4. I launch WinZip and "Open" up "WINDOWS,ZIP" and "Extract" to
the empty "WINDOWS" folder in D:

5. I repeat step 4 for "Program Files.ZIP" and "Documents and
Settings.ZIP".

Misc. Information:

In addition to those 3 folders at the root directory, there are 2 or 3
hidden folders. They are "Recycle.Bin", "System Volume Information"
(contains
System Restore "stuff", but is empty when System Restore is turned off),
and
maybe "MSOCache" (relative to Microsoft Office).

John


Here's how I've been backing up XP, and I mention it only to suggest the use
of Image For DOS from Terrabyte. Create up to three primary partitions on
a hard drive, and all the logicals you want. I put data, OE Store, etc on
one
of the logicals. Install XP to one of the primaries.
At regular intervals use Image For DOS to copy (clone) C: to one of the
other primarys but do not make the clone active.

Also use a tray so you can slip in another hard drive, create 3 primaries on
it, and logicals as you desire. Use Image For DOS and clone partitions one
at a time to the HDD in the tray. Mine copies C in a little over a minute,
so
backing up is very rapid. Remove the HDD in the tray and store in a safe.
 
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J

jaugustine

Hi,

It seems to me a lot of people are going to abandon WinXP when
Microsoft ends support. That is a real shame because WinXP is a
very good OS.

Several of my computers use a dual boot system. The HDDs (hard
disk drive) are "split" into two logical drives, C: and D:. Win98 is
installed on C:. When I install WinXP, I select D: and it creates the dual
boot system for me during the installation.

I have always "activated" WinXP over the telephone (toll free number).

I install all the aps I normally use in WinXP, and configure settings in
WinXP and the aps/programs the way I like it. This includes MSCONFIG's
Selective Startups (and a reboot). I turn off "System Restore", I turn
off/disable "automatic updates", and I turn off Hibernation.

I note the number of processes via "Task Manager" that are running which is
typically 17 to 19 (no anti-virus aps and no WiFi). I keep this information
as a reference.

Note: I don't use the internet until after I create the backup(s).

Creating Backup(s):

1. I reboot the computer and select "Windows" (98 on C: partition).

2. I create a "BackUp" folder (C:\BACKUP) and in it a "WinXP" sub-folder.

3. Using WinZip 7.0 (I used for many years), I "zip up" the "WINDOWS"
folder in the D: partition creating "WINDOWS.ZIP" in
C:\BACKUPS\WINXP.

4. I repeat step 3 for "Programs Files" and "Documents and Settings"
(located in D: partition).

One Partition HDD Laptop with Only WinXP:

One of my laptops only has WinXP on a single partition. I removed the HDD
and install it in a "docking station" that you plug into a USB port. Using
another computer, I connect the docking station (external HDD).

Then I use steps 2 and up, but instead of D:, I select the letter for my
external HDD in the docking station.

Note: I have USB flash drives and on them are names of different computers
I have. I copy those 3 .ZIP files to the USB flash drive into a folder named
after the computer they belong to.

Replacing System Folders if There is a "Problem":

If an issue occurs in WinXP due to malware or other cause, I reboot
the computer and use Win98 in C: or remove the HDD and use a docking
station (WinXP computer with one partition HDD).

1. At Dos Prompt, I go to D: and use the command, "DELTREE WINDOWS",

2. I also use the command, "DELTREE PROGRA~1" and "DELTREE DOCUME~1"
Note: You can use the long filenames, but put them in quotes.

Note: I use "DELTREE" at Dos Prompt so I can create space on the HDD,
otherwise everything goes to the "Recycle Bin" (which of course you can
clear).

3. I use the commands, "MD WINDOWS", "MD "Program Files"", and
"MD "Documents and Settings"".

4. I launch WinZip and "Open" up "WINDOWS,ZIP" and "Extract" to
the empty "WINDOWS" folder in D:

5. I repeat step 4 for "Program Files.ZIP" and "Documents and
Settings.ZIP".

Misc. Information:

In addition to those 3 folders at the root directory, there are 2 or 3
hidden folders. They are "Recycle.Bin", "System Volume Information" (contains
System Restore "stuff", but is empty when System Restore is turned off), and
maybe "MSOCache" (relative to Microsoft Office).

John
 
A

Andy

Hi,



It seems to me a lot of people are going to abandon WinXP when

Microsoft ends support. That is a real shame because WinXP is a

very good OS.



Several of my computers use a dual boot system. The HDDs (hard

disk drive) are "split" into two logical drives, C: and D:. Win98 is

installed on C:. When I install WinXP, I select D: and it creates the dual

boot system for me during the installation.



I have always "activated" WinXP over the telephone (toll free number).



I install all the aps I normally use in WinXP, and configure settings in

WinXP and the aps/programs the way I like it. This includes MSCONFIG's

Selective Startups (and a reboot). I turn off "System Restore", I turn

off/disable "automatic updates", and I turn off Hibernation.



I note the number of processes via "Task Manager" that are running which is

typically 17 to 19 (no anti-virus aps and no WiFi). I keep this information

as a reference.



Note: I don't use the internet until after I create the backup(s).



Creating Backup(s):



1. I reboot the computer and select "Windows" (98 on C: partition).



2. I create a "BackUp" folder (C:\BACKUP) and in it a "WinXP" sub-folder.



3. Using WinZip 7.0 (I used for many years), I "zip up" the "WINDOWS"

folder in the D: partition creating "WINDOWS.ZIP" in

C:\BACKUPS\WINXP.



4. I repeat step 3 for "Programs Files" and "Documents and Settings"

(located in D: partition).



One Partition HDD Laptop with Only WinXP:



One of my laptops only has WinXP on a single partition. I removed the HDD

and install it in a "docking station" that you plug into a USB port. Using

another computer, I connect the docking station (external HDD).



Then I use steps 2 and up, but instead of D:, I select the letter for my

external HDD in the docking station.



Note: I have USB flash drives and on them are names of different computers

I have. I copy those 3 .ZIP files to the USB flash drive into a folder named

after the computer they belong to.



Replacing System Folders if There is a "Problem":



If an issue occurs in WinXP due to malware or other cause, I reboot

the computer and use Win98 in C: or remove the HDD and use a docking

station (WinXP computer with one partition HDD).



1. At Dos Prompt, I go to D: and use the command, "DELTREE WINDOWS",



2. I also use the command, "DELTREE PROGRA~1" and "DELTREE DOCUME~1"

Note: You can use the long filenames, but put them in quotes.



Note: I use "DELTREE" at Dos Prompt so I can create space on the HDD,

otherwise everything goes to the "Recycle Bin" (which of course you can

clear).



3. I use the commands, "MD WINDOWS", "MD "Program Files"", and

"MD "Documents and Settings"".



4. I launch WinZip and "Open" up "WINDOWS,ZIP" and "Extract" to

the empty "WINDOWS" folder in D:



5. I repeat step 4 for "Program Files.ZIP" and "Documents and

Settings.ZIP".



Misc. Information:



In addition to those 3 folders at the root directory, there are 2 or 3

hidden folders. They are "Recycle.Bin", "System Volume Information" (contains

System Restore "stuff", but is empty when System Restore is turned off), and

maybe "MSOCache" (relative to Microsoft Office).



John

I disagree that a lot of users will stop using XP.

An image backup is much easier and more reliable.

andy
 
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K

Kerneldebugger

Bill in Co said:
I agree it is really important to back up the system, and think quite a
few of us will stick with XP for a few more years. I also keep System
Restore and ERUNT as further backup options, and ERUNT in particular has
come in handy a few times. I only boot to WinXP, since WinXP covers
everything I need. But I use an even simpler backup scheme:

I simply image the C: partition (with programs and data) to another drive
partition, and thus don't bother splitting up Program Files, Windows, etc.
This way everything stays together in one single image file (no partials
here). The image backup takes only about 10 minutes (I'm using ATI Home),
for about 30 GB or so. (But what I don't backup there are my music and
video collections, which are stored on other partitions)


I've got about 40 running processes, including anti-virus. I also monitor
this religiously. For example, when svchost occasionally shows up at the
top of the list in Task Manager, I get suspicious, and restore a previous
image backup. :) Svchost is a "cover" for other subprocesses, but I've
been burned before with something related to a svchost issue (never did
find out what it actually was), so I'm very wary when svchost gets on top.
:)


I prefer cloning the hard drive to another hard drive, rather than make an
image.
That way, when things go south, all I have to do is plug in the backup hard
drive.
 

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