Using a Relative's Westel 7500 DSL Modem/Router


J

jaugustine

Hi,

Lately I have been having intermittent issues with my internet connection
using a Westel 7500 DSL modem/router. Note: I am not using
WiFi (I use CAT5 cable) and only one computer at a time. I tried another
computer, but I still have the same problem.

I have rebooted my modem via turning off the power for a couple minutes,
then turning it back on. Note: I never performed a "reset" to factory
settings.

The modem/router I have was issued to me by my ISP. My cousin
has the exact same modem/router which he gave to me before going
over seas. This modem/router was issued to him by the same ISP I
have. The ISP never requested his modem/router to be returned
when he discontinued his internet service!!

Is it possible for me to use his modem as a test to see
if my intermittent issue is my modem?

I ask because I assume my ISP has a "signature" of
my modem "logged". In other words, if I am using another that
wasn't issued to me, would it "raise a flag"?

Thank You in advance, John
 
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P

Paul

Hi,

Lately I have been having intermittent issues with my internet connection
using a Westel 7500 DSL modem/router. Note: I am not using
WiFi (I use CAT5 cable) and only one computer at a time. I tried another
computer, but I still have the same problem.

I have rebooted my modem via turning off the power for a couple minutes,
then turning it back on. Note: I never performed a "reset" to factory
settings.

The modem/router I have was issued to me by my ISP. My cousin
has the exact same modem/router which he gave to me before going
over seas. This modem/router was issued to him by the same ISP I
have. The ISP never requested his modem/router to be returned
when he discontinued his internet service!!

Is it possible for me to use his modem as a test to see
if my intermittent issue is my modem?

I ask because I assume my ISP has a "signature" of
my modem "logged". In other words, if I am using another that
wasn't issued to me, would it "raise a flag"?

Thank You in advance, John

Cable Internet, the ISP can use the MAC address as a unique
identifier for the hardware. At one time, a different cable
internet modem could not be used, without phoning the ISP
and giving the new MAC address.

The ADSL doesn't do that as far as I know. I don't remember
reading any articles about MAC enforcement. Some ISPs will
insist on only using their rentals, and they may have some
enforcement system in place.

My current phone company is "open", since ADSL is available
to be sold through resellers, and the resellers allow
any ADSL modem/router box to be used.

I would say, give it a try :) Should work. You'll need
to enter the VCI:VPI if appropriate, the PPP username and
account info. The phone company has the physical
association (the phone line coming into the CO),
as proof ADSL is authorized. They have your username/password
as well as the line number, to prove it is you.

*******

ADSL modems, modern ADSL2+ ones, can overheat. Some
have had the "bad cap" problem (the caps can rot, even
if the box is powered off and cold). Open up the box and
examine the power converter area, for evidence of leaking
caps.

Modern ADSL modems, are also sensitive to AC line noise.
If you have arcing/sparking type noises on your AC lines
(added by anybody sharing the same distribution transformer
as you), those can flow up the wall adapter cable, and the
noise can be imposed on the DC feed to the ADSL modem.
I had a "loss of sync" problem caused by that.

The reason that happens, is the ADSL modem design happens
to be "totally floating". This is done to drop the noise
floor, under ideal conditions, and make high speed
Internet possible. But such an approach, can also make the
unit sensitive to local disturbances. You would think
the wall adapter would be designed with good "thru-noise"
protection, but at least mine, isn't. If the wall adapter
had a three-pronged plug, they could have implemented a
two stage noise filter. You can also add your own line noise
filter if you want.

(Put a 10VN1 in a project box, with AC male and female
connectorization, for series connected filtering chores...
Pay attention to the frequency band it filters. 10KHz lower
bound, would cover the noise coming from an ATX power supply.
The really good filtering, starts at 100KHz. These things
are similar in concept, to the filtering used on the
front end of ATX supplies.)

http://media.digikey.com/PDF/Data Sheets/Tyco Electronics Corcom PDFs/N Series RFI Filters.pdf

http://www.digikey.com/product-search/en?Cat=3408328&k=10vn1 ($74 each)

*******

You can use DMT to display modem performance. Each "version"
of DMT, only supports a limited set of modems. DMT uses Telnet
to connect to a modem, and extract the performance parameters.

http://dmt.mhilfe.de/

Example of a displayed result.

http://img.mhilfe.de/dmt6.png

I can't use DMT right now, because I'm running the ADSL modem/router
bridged, and the modem is on another subnet. I would have to put the
ADSL box back into "standard operating mode", to be able
to use DMT from my computer.

Paul
 

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