Compatible? Modem and Router


M

MapleE.

Hi:
The Modem and Router Combo. I've been using for years is 'G' form that is
'non-fast' one, .... 54 Mbps.

Now I want more speed, then I'm thinking of 'N' form, ... 150 Mbps Wireless
Router while I plan to stay on the Modem, 'G/54.'

My question is;
Modem and Router got to be same speed, 'G' or 'N?'
In the case I'd install Router 'N'/150 Mbps, what would it happen to the
Modem that is 'G?'

Tanks for your help in advance.
 
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P

Paul

MapleE. said:
Hi:
The Modem and Router Combo. I've been using for years is 'G' form that is
'non-fast' one, .... 54 Mbps.

Now I want more speed, then I'm thinking of 'N' form, ... 150 Mbps Wireless
Router while I plan to stay on the Modem, 'G/54.'

My question is;
Modem and Router got to be same speed, 'G' or 'N?'
In the case I'd install Router 'N'/150 Mbps, what would it happen to the
Modem that is 'G?'

Tanks for your help in advance.

If it was my equipment, I'd connect the modem and router with wire,
as they could be co-located. In some cases, you can buy a combination
modem and router, so they're inside the same box anyway. That is
the easiest way to solve your problem, is integrate the two of them
together.

/\ 150mbit/sec
~10mbit/sec /\
modem -------------- router_802.11n computer_#1
ethernet
cable computer_#2

In the figure, either computer can talk to the modem, at
10 mbit/sec, which is limited by the connection to your ISP. So
that path isn't particularly demanding of performance.

If computer #1 wants to talk to computer #2, that can flow through
the router. So the 802.11n may help you with file sharing for example,
between computer #1 and #2.

I don't know all the details of 802.11n, but I understand that
"N" has some fallback procedures, if "G" equipment is detected.
For example, "N" can use 40MHz channels, instead of the older 20MHz
wide channels. If older "G" equipment is present, that may prevent
the "N" equipment from using the wider channel setting. So if
I was going to waste money on an upgrade, I'd want to make
damn sure there was no legacy equipment in the vicinity, preventing
me from getting full performance.

I think "N" can use 2.4GHz and 5GHz, and it is possible there are
fewer restrictions on 5GHz. That isn't clear in this powerpoint
slide set. This slide set addresses "N" in the 2.4GHz band.

https://mentor.ieee.org/802.11/dcn/09/11-09-0576-03-000n-sp2-40mhz-coexistence-cids-presentation.ppt

http://www.wireless-nets.com/resources/tutorials/migrate_80211n.html

"The most effective configuration for mixed mode is to install
two radios in each access point. Place the 802.11b/g traffic on 2.4GHz
radios and the 802.11n-only traffic on the other (ideally 5GHz) radios.
Keep in mind that not all countries allow 802.11n 5GHz operation."

So if you're going to do it, read up on it first. Don't expect
the instructions "on the back of the box", to be completely
honest about how to install it.

So if possible, I'd "wire" the modem to the router, and
disable the radio on the modem. That way, the new wireless
router could be a fancy "N" version. Then, you'd upgrade
the interface cards on all the computers to "N" as well.

Even if a wireless device has no controls over its radio,
connecting a "terminator" in place of an antenna, will
absorb all the radio energy. As long as the terminator
plug has sufficient power handling, it can be used to
make a radio "quiet". So if the modem had radio and wired
interface, and no controls over which was used, there are
ways to influence which interface it uses.

I picked up a few hints on this stuff, here.

http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/wireless

They have charts, if you can figure out what they're measuring.

http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/component/option,com_wireless/Itemid,200

A review of a router with both 2.4GHz and 5GHz radios. Also
has very capable wired ports, such as the WAN one you could
run over to your modem.

http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/content/view/30925/96/

Paul
 
M

MapleE.

Thanks for the detailed and knowledgeable response.

Sounds it's NOT easy to replace an existing router to the brand new one that
is more 'speed' purchased from local Staple. The Staple tech. told me my
IP is slow, because of non- 'Fiber Optic' or some similar phrase. His IP is
much faster than my IP. He told me 'N' is very ideal to resolve this issue,
.... slow.

In my fear that if I'd replace brand new router/N by taking off the existing
router,'G,' it sound like 'conflict' .... even not able to get Internet at
all in some of PCs with XPs. I'm not even close to an expert to deal this
form of issue. If that would happen, I might end up needing to call IP
tech. to fix. Normally, IP tech shows up two or three days later after
initial call. Also, all IP techs. have not good knowledge to deal with
some of issues. One time, I needed to wait more than one week to resolve
the TV issue when TV changed to 'digital.' That was after three different
techs. and one of them found the right answer, ... wiring inside the house.

Then, I might be better to stick with the current Modem/Router combo. which
is 'G?'

Any other suggestions in regard to 'speed-booster?'

Thanks,
 
L

Lem

MapleE. said:
Hi:
The Modem and Router Combo. I've been using for years is 'G' form that is
'non-fast' one, .... 54 Mbps.

Now I want more speed, then I'm thinking of 'N' form, ... 150 Mbps Wireless
Router while I plan to stay on the Modem, 'G/54.'

My question is;
Modem and Router got to be same speed, 'G' or 'N?'
In the case I'd install Router 'N'/150 Mbps, what would it happen to the
Modem that is 'G?'

Tanks for your help in advance.

You need to better understand the difference between a "modem" and a
"wireless router." It's not the "modem" and the "router" which have to
be the same speed, but rather the "wireless router" and the wireless
adapter in your computer that have to be the same speed (otherwise, the
wireless connection will only be as fast as the slowest device).

You also should stop listening to Staples sales people. Buying a
wireless-N router will do nothing to speed up a slow connection to your
Internet Service Provider (ISP).

Your Internet connection is only as fast as its slowest link. If your
wireless router *AND* the wireless adapters in your computer are *BOTH*
wireless N devices, you may get connection speeds between your
modem/router and your computer of up to 130-160 Mbps.

If the connection between you and your ISP is by dial-up, the maximum
speed seen by your computer will be 56 kbps = 0.056 Mbps regardless of
the speed of the connection between your modem/router and your computer.
If this is what you have, you will see no difference by using wireless-N.

If the connection between you and your ISP is DSL, you may get up to
1500 kbps = 1.5 Mbps, depending on what you are paying for. Some DSL
service is slower. If this is what you have, you will see no difference
by using wireless-N.

If the connection between you and your ISP is cable, you typically will
see about 6 Mbps. If this is what you have, you will see no difference
by using wireless-N. If you pay extra for "premium" cable service, you
may get up to about 30 Mbps. At the upper end of this range, you might
see a slight improvement by changing from a wireless-G network to an all
wireless-N network. I suspect, however, that the speed difference would
not be noticeable in typical Internet surfing. If you pay even more for
"ultra premium" cable service, you might get up to 100 Mpbs. In this
case, you definitely would see a speed improvement if you replaced both
your router and your computer's wireless adapters with wireless-N devices.

If the connection between you and your ISP is by fiber optic cable to
your home (e.g., Verizon FiOS), you can pay for either 15 Mbps, 25 Mpbs,
or 50 Mbps. If you have the most expensive play, you will see a speed
improvement by changing to all wireless-N devices. I expect that Verizon
also will soon match "ultra" cable (for yet an additional fee) in those
markets where cable is offering this service.
 
P

Paul

MapleE. said:
Thanks for the detailed and knowledgeable response.

Sounds it's NOT easy to replace an existing router to the brand new one that
is more 'speed' purchased from local Staple. The Staple tech. told me my
IP is slow, because of non- 'Fiber Optic' or some similar phrase. His IP is
much faster than my IP. He told me 'N' is very ideal to resolve this issue,
... slow.

In my fear that if I'd replace brand new router/N by taking off the existing
router,'G,' it sound like 'conflict' .... even not able to get Internet at
all in some of PCs with XPs. I'm not even close to an expert to deal this
form of issue. If that would happen, I might end up needing to call IP
tech. to fix. Normally, IP tech shows up two or three days later after
initial call. Also, all IP techs. have not good knowledge to deal with
some of issues. One time, I needed to wait more than one week to resolve
the TV issue when TV changed to 'digital.' That was after three different
techs. and one of them found the right answer, ... wiring inside the house.

Then, I might be better to stick with the current Modem/Router combo. which
is 'G?'

Any other suggestions in regard to 'speed-booster?'

Thanks,

When you get your Internet connection from the ISP, they have different
service plans. For example, my connection is via ADSL from the telephone
company, and the transfer rate is 4 megabits/sec. If I had 802.11g, that
would likely handle that rate, as long as the signal level was good
and there weren't too many walls in the way and so on. Wireless setups
hardly ever run at the rated speed, so for starters, you should assume
they'll run at half the stated rate. Still, wireless-g should be able to
handle the download speed of my ISP.

There are some Verison FIOS plans for comparison here. They offer 15, 25, and
50 megabits/sec download rates. For the last two, I might want 802.11n
equipment for distribution within the home. But if your ISP offers much
slower service, like mine does, then 802.11g is probably good enough.

http://www22.verizon.com/Residential/FiOSInternet/Plans/Plans.htm

Also, I don't use wireless, preferring wired connections with
constant transmission capabilities and reliable performance. In ideal
circumstances, wireless is fine. If you live in an apartment building,
surrounded by tons of people with wireless, that might be a less
than ideal environment, to get good performance.

Paul
 
M

MapleE.

Lem:
Thanks for the VERY knowledgeable and informative response. I really
appreciate it.

Since I learned by reading your response, I'm very sure I do not need an
unnecessary trip to the stores along with 'hard-earned money' to spend.

It's a pain for anyone like me who has a very minimum knowledge as to 'ISP'
and all other necessary components my household needs.

"Knowledge is POWER.'

Thanks again,
 
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M

MapleE.

Paul:
Thanks for the response.

I live in big city and there are two 'big' ISPs that apper to be
competetive.

Before getting a current ISP, my household was on another ISP that is now
'fiber-optic,' that offers faster service according a Staple tech./sales
associate whom I know for few years. Also, I live in house, not apartment,
but like any big city, there is a tight space between neighbors. Mostr of
neighbors have same ISP my household have and I see often ISP-truck driving
around in my neighborhood. Then, I guess there are some issues like mine,
but again my household a kind wants to stick with a current ISP. Becuase a
rate is not bad and also some of tech guys are very proficient and friendly.
My ISP offers both 'TV' and 'five PCs' service. Only an issue I have is a
yound generation who likes 'speed.'

By reading all of responses, I definitely learned a lot of stuff in regard
to ISP and most importantly, 'speed.'

btw) The way you're writing/response, I'm reminicense a name 'Paul.' His
initial is 'PT' and my initial is 'GE' and worked together long time ago.
That person, Paul loves computer more than his real job. But, I heard he
moved away to the country and I changed a job. If you're that person I
fondly remember, I want to say 'THANKS,' because you helped me a lot about
'PC' and all others.

Thanks again,
 

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